Archive for the ‘Shale gas’ Category

Airport scene [image credit: Wikipedia]

Airport scene
[image credit: Wikipedia]


The New York Times reports on one advantage of owning a large block of land:

‘With a single well, drillers can bore down a few thousand feet, turn sideways and drill lateral wells up to two miles long. In other areas of Pennsylvania, that can mean having to secure permission from hundreds of property owners. The airport, though, is 9,000 acres with a single landlord.’

“It’s like finding money,” said Rich Fitzgerald, the county executive of Allegheny County, which owns the airport. “Suddenly you’ve got this valuable asset that nobody knew was there.”

(more…)

From New Scientist:

As sanctions deepen, just how crucial is Russian gas?
17:00 24 July 2014 by Jon Excell

Russian-bear-cartoonEurope gets around 30 per cent of its gas from Russia, but some countries are more dependent on it than others: the Czech Republic and Finland, for example, import at least 80 per cent of their gas from the country, while Germany, which has been treading particularly carefully in its dealings with Putin, imports around 36 per cent of its natural gas and 39 per cent of its oil from Russian suppliers.

The situation in the UK is less clear. Gas imports account for around 70 per cent of supply, but because of the complex European network of pipelines and interconnectors that we rely on, it’s difficult to say exactly how much of that imported gas is Russian. Some reports claim that Russia supplies around 15 per cent of that total and others put this figure much lower. Russian energy giant Gazprom estimates that it sends 11 to 12 billion cubic metres to the UK each year, out of an overall UK consumption of around 84 billion cubic metres.

(more…)

H/T to Oldbrew for this story via GWPF from the Sunday Times. I hope this haste doesn’t mean we’ll lose a lot of the benefit of developing a home grown shale gas extraction industry, with the benefits of boosting UK engineering and providing much needed indigenous employment and training in worthwhile skills.

FAST-TRACK FRACK LICENCES ‘VITAL TO PROTECT BRITAIN’
Date: 27/07/14 Tim Shipman, The Sunday Times

Blackpools-Shale-Gas-Dril-007Fracking for shale gas is to be fast-tracked because it will give Britain greater energy security and protect it from Russian aggression, the new Tory energy minister has revealed.
In an interview with The Sunday Times, Matthew Hancock said the government would make it “much quicker” for companies to get approval to drill for shale gas.

At present firms that want to frack have to wait about six months for permission through a 15-stage process. Hancock hopes to slash that in half. Calling shale the “holy grail” of energy policy, he said:

I want to speed up shale. It takes too long at the moment. We have to ensure that instead of an array of complicated permissions we have very firm but very clear rules.

(more…)

image

From the Guardian

Pipes and pylons operator says failure to invest more in local gas production would leave country 90% dependent on imports

The price of electricity could double over the next two decades, according to forecasts published on Thursday by the National Grid, the company responsible for keeping Britain’s lights on.

The current price of wholesale electricity is below £50 per megawatt hour but could soar to over £100 by 2035 under a “high case” example used in the Grid’s UK Future Energy Scenarios report.

(more…)

Blackpools-Shale-Gas-Dril-007From Emily Gosden in the Telegraph:

Centrica has said it is unlikely to bid for more UK fracking rights when they are offered in coming weeks, underlining the uncertainty over whether shale gas extraction will prove to be viable.

The British Gas owner last year became the first major company to back the search for UK shale when it bought a 25pc stake in licences owned by Cuadrilla in the Bowland basin in Lancs, in a deal worth up to £160m.

Ministers are expected to launch the “14th onshore licensing round” by July, offering up drilling rights across 37,000 square miles of Britain.

But Mark Hanafin, Centrica’s head of upstream, said it would “probably not” bid for more access, suggesting it did not want to “bet” more money on shale before fracking had taken place to prove whether the gas could actually be extracted.

“My main focus is not on grabbing land, it’s on the Bowland shale,” he said. “Finding out if the UK has got this amazing resource or not – it might not.”

(more…)

 
,

For many years, environmental activists have pushed for bans, moratoria, or other restrictions on hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), alleging the process is a threat to public health and the environment. But in recent months, increasing numbers of environmentalists have distanced themselves from the “ban fracking” agenda. Many have even embraced shale gas on environmental grounds, revealing how extreme and marginalized the campaign to restrict hydraulic fracturing has become.

(more…)

The question is prompted from reading this report on the BBC website:
‘World’s Fair: Isaac Asimov’s predictions 50 years on’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-27069716

Tesla’s concept of free wireless electricity never made it to market, but maybe one day…
Tesla_colorado

An obvious one might be the fusion reactor, as Asimov foresaw: “An experimental fusion-power plant or two will already exist.”

Chances must be good (?) if schoolboys can already build their own:
‘All my friends think I’m mad’

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/10679744/British-schoolboy-13-becomes-youngest-to-build-nuclear-fusion-reactor.html

More likely is the commercial development of methane hydrates as an abundant energy source, if or when shale gas has run its course or is politically a no-no:
‘Methane hydrate: Dirty fuel or energy saviour?’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-27021610

Or we could all be spurning fuel technology, piling on the thermal clothes and going around on bicycles, hoping the sun shines and the wind blows ;-)

Guest post from Andrew McKillop

Death Cross Mix for European Energy : No Future
by Andrew McKillop 29-03-2014

EU-sinkingPlay With the Toy Until it Breaks
Commentators have begun to focus on the “moving average” of always-unrealistic energy policy and programs in the European Union, easily finding that they signal a “bearish outlook” for future energy supply in Europe – but certainly not for energy prices.  In fact not only the poster child victim of the EU’s mix and mingle of often-extreme policies – electricity, but also increasingly gas and then oil – faces a supply outlook that almost inevitably has to be down. This is despite, or because of, ever-rising energy prices, led by electricity price rises! Prices are driven up by a death cross convergence of political, economic, financial, technical and even cultural “life style” factors. In the poster child country for European “energy transition”, German household electricity prices are around 25 euro cents per kiloWatthour in early 2014, pricing their power at an oil equivalent (1600 kWh per barrel) of around $540 per barrel equivalent. Can we be surprised that German electricity consumption is falling?

(more…)

Excerpts from Robert Bryce’s forthcoming report for the Institute on American Energy Advantages, via the Wall Street Journal: H/T R.J. Salvador
fracking
For years, greens and many on the political left have insisted that widespread adoption of renewable energy will create jobs and stimulate the economy. An example: In September 2008, then-candidate Barack Obama claimed at a speech in Golden, Colo., that his planned investments in “green” energy would create “five million new jobs that pay well and can’t ever be outsourced.”

It was all bunk.

(more…)

This is just a brief post regarding the UK’s need to regain its sovereignty, and UK Independence Party’s tactics to achieve that goal. This is vital if the UK is to regain control over its energy policy, and end the madness of the E.U. Tory/Libdem and Labour party obsession with ‘carbon emissions’.

Google search results:

UKIP + “EU exit”
About 16,000 results (0.29 seconds)

I’ve just used google trends to check when the combination of UKIP+EU exit” has been most newsworthy. Unsurprisingly it has been near elections. The highest result is this year, following UKIP’s electoral success in May, when it gained around 140 council seats.

ukip-eu-exit-trendhttp://tallbloke.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/ukip-eu-exit-trend.png

In terms of raising public awareness, and shifting public opinion, UKIP has been highly successful. A majority in the UK now think we should leave the E.U. Before May, a majority thought we should stay in.

(more…)

My thanks to Michele Casati for the Heads-up on this blistering three minute speech by UKIP leader Nigel Farage in the European Parliament. He lambasts EU supremo Jose Manuel Baroso for the stupidity of the Green Agenda pursued by the E.U.’s leadership over the last decade, and the fuel poverty and industrial flight it has caused. Baroso’s following two minute hate is well worth a watch too. In it he claims the scientific consensus on global warming is now up to 99%. It’ll be 104% next year and all targets for the five year plan will have been met…

(more…)

NowindFrom the Telegraph:

Owen Paterson, the Environment Secretary, has commissioned a consultancy to investigate whether renewable technologies – including wind turbines – lower house prices in the countryside.

Chris Heaton-Harris, the Conservative MP for Daventry, said:

“Wind farms definitely affect house prices and it is highly likely that this report will come to that conclusion…I would expect there to be billions of pounds of planning blight because of wind turbines close to properties…. It’s almost like elements of DECC are acting like a mafia … now you’ve got DECC trying to stick its dirty great footprints all over another department’s work. While this is unsurprising, it will all unravel in the end and I’m sure the evidence will come out soon that proves a number of these points correct.”

He said that one of his constituents had seen the value of their £700,000 property fall by £250,000 because of approved plans for a wind turbine.

(more…)

Police Clear Way for Fracking at Balcombe

Posted: August 23, 2013 by Rog Tallbloke in alarmism, Legal, Shale gas

From GWPF

balcombe-camping

There were fewer than 100 protesters left tonight at a potential fracking site as they finally admitted defeat to the police. More than 1,200 activists had brought exploratory shale gas drilling to a halt on the edge of the village of Balcombe, West Sussex, at the weekend. But after officers from more than 10 police forces pushed back campaigners from the site’s entrance allowing lorries to enter on Monday, they left in their droves. –Ryan Kisiel, Daily Mail, 22 August 2013
Protesters against fracking risk worsening the plight of the five million households struggling to pay their energy bills, Britain’s official fuel poverty adviser has warned. Ministers have a “duty” to promote the extraction of shale gas because it has the potential to drive down the cost of energy, according to the chairman of the Fuel Poverty Advisory Group. Derek Lickorish says that “the voice of the fuel poor has been lost in the current frenzy” at Balcombe, West Sussex, where the energy company Cuadrilla Resources has been targeted by anti-fracking protesters. –Tim Webb, The Times, 21 August 2013

(more…)

Lars Sørum: The three perceived risks of fracking

Posted: August 13, 2013 by Rog Tallbloke in alarmism, Shale gas

From risk management company DNV

Lars Sørum, Director of Shale Gas, DNV:

The below three issues are in my opinion the most important only because they are the most debated. Let’s be clear; the risks associated with unconventional gas are not significantly different from those of conventional exploration. Nor are the most relevant risk areas below ground, but on the surface and mostly non-technical . So the reason to highlight the below as the top 3 challenges is related to the “perceived risks” rather than the “actual risks”. These perceptions in turn can topple the best of business plans and are therefore still pretty important. Important are also the economics of a unconventional business – but in this piece I figured I would stay with the “popular ones”, also covered in DNVs Recommended Practice, which gives guidance to this and other issues.

Fracking

(more…)

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has finally realised Shale gas development is a no brainer. From the Telegraph:

We cannot afford to miss out on shale gas
David Cameron MP 12-8-13

Cameron-Wind_seFracking has become a national debate in Britain – and it’s one that I’m determined to win. If we don’t back this technology, we will miss a massive opportunity to help families with their bills and make our country more competitive. Without it, we could lose ground in the tough global race.

As with any advance in technology, fracking – drilling for so-called “unconventional” gas – has rightly drawn scrutiny. But a lot of myths have also sprung up. So today I want to set out why I support it – and deal with the worst of the myths at the same time.

First, fracking has real potential to drive energy bills down. Labour’s mismanagement of the economy means that many people are struggling with the cost of living today. Where we can act to relieve the pressure, we must. It’s simple – gas and electric bills can go down when our home-grown energy supply goes up. We’re not turning our back on low carbon energy, but these sources aren’t enough. We need a mix. Latest estimates suggest that there’s about 1,300 trillion cubic feet of shale gas lying underneath Britain at the moment – and that study only covers 11 counties. To put that in context, even if we extract just a tenth of that figure, that is still the equivalent of 51 years’ gas supply.
(more…)

Cameron-Wind_seFrom the Scotsman:

Britain would be “making a big mistake” if it did not seriously consider fracking and the prospect of cheaper gas prices, the Prime Minister has said.

David Cameron said the country is “missing out big time at the moment” as he compared the number of shale gas wells dug in the European Union compared with the United States.

But he cautioned safety needs to be assured and that “very clear” environmental procedures would have to be met before companies are given the go-ahead to start fracking. Cameron said:

We would be making a big mistake as a nation if we did not think hard about how to encourage fracking and cheaper prices right here in the UK…If you look what’s happening in America with the advent of shale gas and fracking, their energy costs in business and their gas prices are half the level of ours.

(more…)

US Senator Lisa Murkowski has written a report which urges the Obama Administration to stop dragging its feet and aid its allies.

us-murkowski

 

(more…)

From the London Evening Standard:

Energy Minister Michael Fallon: The South East must accept fracking
Joe Murphy, Political Editor

nimbyThe South East must accept shale gas exploration for the sake of Britain’s economic future, Energy Minister Michael Fallon declared today.

He stepped after Surrey-based peer Lord Howell caused outrage by saying “desolate” areas of the North East should be targeted instead.

“It cannot be right to confine it to areas of the industrial North,” he told the Evening Standard.

“Shale exists under towns, villages and countryside. Shale gas is everywhere and could well be in quantity under attractive areas of the country as well as industrial areas.”

The Tory minister was cool about the remarks made by Lord Howell of Guildford, who is George Osborne’s father in law and a former Energy Secretary.

“He has apologised and it’s probably best left there,” he said. Lord Howell has been widely condemned by northern politicians and bishops for suggesting drilling should avoid the South.

(more…)

george-mitchellFrom the New York Times:

By 

George P. Mitchell, the son of a Greek goatherd who capped a career as one of the most prominent independent oilmen in the United States by unlocking immense natural gas and petroleum resources trapped in shale rock formations, died on Friday in Galveston, Tex. He was 94.

On a hunch, Mr. Mitchell began drilling shale rock formations in the Texas dirt fields where he had long pumped oil and gas.

Mr. Mitchell’s role in championing new drilling and production techniques like hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” is credited with creating an unexpected natural gas boom in the United States. In a letter to President Obama last year, Daniel Yergin, the energy scholar and author, proposed that Mr. Mitchell be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

“It is because of him that we can talk seriously about ‘energy independence,’ ” he said. (Mr. Mitchell did not receive the award.)

(more…)

Presidential decree trumps common sense and economic reality:

hollandeFrom the BBC: H/T David Vance

French President Francois Hollande has again ruled out exploration for shale gas during his presidency.

The comments come as a French court was due to examine an appeal against a government ban on “fracking”.

France has some of the most plentiful reserves of shale gas in Europe, but there are objections to shale exploration on environmental grounds.

“As long as I am president, there will be no exploration for shale gas in France,”

Mr Hollande told French TV.

(more…)