Awe inspiring: Movie of the vastness of the Andomeda galaxy

Posted: January 21, 2015 by tallbloke in Astronomy
Tags:

This is a visual treat. Hubble has made a 4.3gigabyte image of Andromeda. The three minute youtube video below explores about a quarter of the rich detail. Cool music too. H/T to @karlos1705

Comments
  1. craigm350 says:

    Reblogged this on CraigM350 and commented:
    Wow! Thanks for sharing Rog.

  2. colliemum says:

    Awesome really is the only appropriate word for this!
    Thanks for this, Rog!

  3. J Martin says:

    Containing 1 trillion stars and due to colide with the Milky Way in 2.75 billion years time, there may be some intelligent life in both galaxies getting a close up view of the event.

  4. tallbloke says:

    How do galaxies collide when the big bang theorists tell us everything is accelerating away from everything else?

  5. Anything is possible says:

    @TB

    “The Milky Way galaxy is part of a larger cosmic neighborhood — a collection of more than 35 galaxies known as the Local Group.

    These galaxies move through space as a single unit, bound together by their mutual gravitational pull.”

    http://stardate.org/astro-guide/btss/galaxies/local_group

  6. Truthseeker says:

    Actually TB, Earth is not in the Milky Way Galaxy. We are in the Sagitarius Dwarf Galaxy that is in the process of colliding with the Milky Way Galaxy. So by the time the Milky Way Galaxy collides with the Andromeda Galaxy, we may well be somewhere else entirely.

    http://viewzone2.com/milkywayx.html

  7. scute1133 says:

    @TB
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=H93n-k3SkiQ

    Scroll to 3:50 ( yellow paint pot and beyond). The web of filaments that form is like the filaments of strung-out galaxies. The whole explodes and the ‘local group’ and many other groups tend to end up along the filaments. It’s all about initial conditions. In this case molecular cohesive forces are at play of course.

  8. Graeme No.3 says:

    Tallbloke – colliding galaxies?

    Surely it must be due to carbon dioxide; everything else has been blamed on it, so why not?

  9. wolsten says:

    Thanks for sharing, hard to beat for putting things in perspective.

  10. kuhnkat says:

    “These galaxies move through space as a single unit, bound together by their mutual gravitational pull.””

    Except gravity is too weak so they have to make up stuff like dark matter and dark energy to bandaid their models…

  11. linneamogren says:

    As a student of astronomy, I was brought to tears watching this amazing video from NASA. The beauty and the size of Andromeda is overwhelming. And to think when the Milky Way and Andromeda collide in 2.5 million years, the chances of any star or planet crashing into each other is next to zero.

    This NASA video makes me proud of my studies and will share it with my classmates.

  12. linneamogren says:

    Once Andromeda and the Milky Way collide, it will create a massive elliptical galaxy. These are always the great igniter of new star formation. There are two enormous black holes which will unite as one within its center. The Triangulum Galaxy will also have its moment when it collides with Andromeda after the Milky Way.

  13. linneamogren says:

    Here’s a fun hypothesis as to gravities weakness. Could it be its being drained due to multidimensional aspects?

  14. tallbloke says:

    While we’re off topic (No problem Linnea):

  15. While we’re off topic (No problem Linnea):

    Now look at who is chatting up? With your limey speak

  16. kuhnkat says:

    linneamogren:

    Here are some non-consensus sites you may find interesting since you are in the field:

    http://www.sjcrothers.plasmaresources.com/
    has proven black holes cannot exist

    http://www.thunderbolts.info/wp/2011/08/18/10609/
    http://www.holoscience.com/wp/
    Electric Universe theory

    http://www.haltonarp.com/articles
    working astronomer questioning red shift assumptions among others

    Unfortunately this gentleman has died:
    http://www.metaresearch.org/home.asp

    http://milesmathis.com/

  17. kuhnkat says:

    TB:

    obviously caused by gravity waves…

  18. Anything is possible says:

    “Halton Arp was an astronomer who faced scientific exile after daring to question the Big Bang theory of the universe’s creation”

    ==========================================

    It’s not just climate science that has a consensus problem……………………………

  19. michael hart says:

    My god, it’s full of stars.

  20. kuhnkat says: January 22, 2015 at 10:11 pm

    “TB: obviously caused by gravity waves…”

    Can you explain the orthogonal time cyclic field expressions, required for such?
    What would Lubos say?

  21. Zeke says:

    Objection your honor. The video is hypnotic.

    The music and slow panning across stars is symptomatic of all space science videos, which put the viewer in a highly suggestible state.

    It is especially problematic when music is tonal, and the pinwheels turn in the center of the screen. Viewers should be cautioned about the use of these cinematic techniques, both when there is narration and when there is not.

  22. Zeke says: – January 23, 2015 at 2:43 am

    “Objection your honor. The video is hypnotic. The music and slow panning across stars is symptomatic of all space science videos, which put the viewer in a highly suggestible state.”

    OK thank you! If the intent of the video was to put the viewer in a highly suggestible state. How do you rate the success of that intent?

    “It is especially problematic when music is tonal, and the pin wheels turn in the centrer of the screen.”
    ” Viewers should be cautioned about the use of these cinematic techniques, both when there is narration and when there is not.”

    Good God. Do you really think this done for your intent to bore everyone? Go somewhere and examine each pixel!! This video is successfully crafted to promote wonder and awe of this universe. Please explain the particular time interval that includes your error? When and where were you so bored ?

  23. Zeke says:

    I don’t find Andromeda boring, Will Janoschka. Thank you for pointing out that I have developed a bah-humbug attitude to space videos using “horror movie” sound tracks, combined with slow pans in black space.

    Would it be fair if I point out that this type of space video deserves its own genre.

    The Andromeda Galaxy is awe inspiring, but viewers should be alert to the difference between genuine awe, and simple hypnotic tricks.

  24. tallbloke says:

    Zeke: It’s hard to feel awe looking at a 13″ laptop screen. Maybe we can forgive the makers of the video their attempt to capture the majesty when you see the milky way for real over a mountainous landscape.

  25. Zeke says:

    Okay, next time I will mute it and not be such an old stick. (:

  26. tallbloke says:

    Zeke: Don’t be intimidated by Will. He just has a provocative sense of humour.

  27. Zeke says: January 23, 2015 at 7:56 pm

    “Okay, next time I will mute it and not be such an old stick. (: ”

    Sorry! I was watching on a 20″ monitor with no sound. I thought the production was good.
    Should I go back to hear the sound? Is it worth it?

  28. linneamogren says:

    @kuhnkat

    Thank you for the great links! I found them very interesting. Next posting on black holesiI have lots to say about the link you posted.

    @Roger

    Sorry if I slipped off topic. Does that mean detention after class? “Wink”

    All seriousness, I was just trying to ponder gravity which was related to your question as to why two galaxies would collide. Thank you for being tolerant of my random postings at times.

  29. kuhnkat says:

    Lemme see, there are about 1.5 billion pixels in the production. You need 3 to make one point of color. There are between 4 billion and 1 trillion stars in Andromeda.

    I am feeling underwhelmed…

    Kinda like after seeing a beautiful new discovery then being told some one made up the colors.

  30. kuhnkat says:

    oops, shoulda been between 400 Billion and 1 Trillion stars.

  31. linneamogren says:

    Ops the the collision will happen in little over 4 billion years!

  32. Zeke says:

    Will Janoschka says: “I was watching on a 20″ monitor with no sound. I thought the production was good. Should I go back to hear the sound? Is it worth it?”

    You’ll have to run it both ways, and see if you notice the difference. Maybe some are more affected than others. But I think young people should be aware of a few of the video techniques that can create a slightly altered state, and note their own physiological responses. Cheers

  33. Zeke says: January 24, 2015 at 7:41 pm

    Will Janoschka says: “I was watching on a 20″ monitor with no sound. I thought the production was good. Should I go back to hear the sound? Is it worth it?”

    “You’ll have to run it both ways, and see if you notice the difference. Maybe some are more affected than others. But I think young people should be aware of a few of the video techniques that can create a slightly altered state, and note their own physiological responses. Cheers”

    Thank you Zeke,
    I agree that this is but intentional contrived selling. Your cautions of the intent of the selling, should be stated prior to anything else. Please consider what you may do with 4.3 Gb of very expensive pixels, when folk, some wealthy, others critical of such governmental, disbursement toward such “very expensive”. To me silence is best when observing 4.3 Gb pixels of over yonder! Then check your wallet. How many pixels can you afford?

  34. suricat says:

    Guys, there’s something here that hasn’t been mentioned yet. Frequency shift!

    If we look at the centre of the galaxy, we see ‘white light’, away from the centre we see more ‘red’, and at the edges we see ‘blue’.

    I don’t know if the ‘colours’ have been ‘enhanced’ for this graphic, but the ‘colour dispersion’ strongly suggests ‘frequency shift towards the red spectra’ where EM emission passes through/near ‘massive objects’.

    Thoughts?🙂

    Best regards, Ray.

  35. “I don’t know if the ‘colours’ have been ‘enhanced’ for this graphic, but the ‘colour dispersion’ strongly suggests ‘frequency shift towards the red spectra’ where EM emission passes through/near ‘massive objects’.”

    What are the rules for the color temperature of each star?

  36. suricat says:

    Will Janoschka says: January 27, 2015 at 5:27 am

    “What are the rules for the color temperature of each star?”

    Isn’t that the ‘problem’ Will?

    Surely the ‘centre spectrum’ of the ‘total EM power’ absorbed by the sensor is arrived at by calculating the RMS of each spectrum observed, then taking the ‘mid power spectrum’ for ‘all the spectra recorded’?

    A ‘problem’ arises when we’re stuck in the ‘vis spectra’ for publishing results. Gamma, X-ray, UV, IR and radio (including microwave) spectra are invisible to the vis spectra. However, I’m not conversant with the spectra that the Hubble Telescope can sense.

    Another however, is that ‘whatever’ the sensing ‘spectral band’. The ‘graphic’ shows ‘bias’! I don’t know if this is ‘enhanced’ in any way!

    Best regards, Ray.

  37. suricat says:

    suricat says: January 29, 2015 at 1:06 am

    “Surely the ‘centre spectrum’ of the ‘total EM power’ absorbed by the sensor is arrived at by calculating the RMS of each spectrum observed, then taking the ‘mid power spectrum’ for ‘all the spectra recorded’?”

    Note. RMS = rms (root mean squared).

    Best regards, Ray.