UK 2015 election aftermath

Posted: May 8, 2015 by tchannon in Politics

Tim writes, posting an article on politics on someone else’s blog, especially when they are running for office, is delicate.

What I know so far

  • Cameron continues as prime minister, has visited HRH Queen Elizabeth about forming a government
  • Ed Milliband has resigned as leader of the Labour party
  • Nick Clegg has resigned as leader of the Liberal Democrat party
  • Nigel Farage has resigned as leader of UKIP
  • The Conservative majority is slender
  • Scottish SDP managed a bloodbath in Scotland taking all but three seats, a massive swing includes seats which were held by the Labour Party for over 80 years.
  • The Green Party are reduced to one MP
  • UKIP are reduced to one MP
  • UKIP received a large increase in their share of the vote, this not translating into seats, is one of the oddities of the UK, not unusual.
  • Welsh and Irish MPs continue. Sien Fien will continue to abstain from attending Westminster.
  • Tattersall lost in the Pudsey parliamentary election, coming in a distant third but nevertheless a good result for a first attempt and in the face of the two dominant UK parties. Breaking in is very hard.

The results for local mainly county based or city/town based elections will appear over the next few days. England does not have a regional parliament. These will bring a different slant on the result.

Looks like Roger kept his deposit, polled more than 5% of the votes.
http://www.parliament.uk/site-information/glossary/deposit/

What next?

Farage presumably carries on as an MEP.

There will be ex-UK appointees to EU posts / jobs.

Bishop Hill (sidebar) will pick up on a number of pertinent snippets.

Post by Tim

Comments
  1. scute1133 says:

    UKIP got 260% times SNP’s share of the vote and ended up with 4% of their number of seats.

  2. p.g.sharrow says:

    @Roger Tattersall; congratulation! you have escaped the pillory of public office. Politics are much easier to practice from the outside. pg

  3. Richard111 says:

    Re scute1133 comment above; I hope Cameron has the gumption the review the voting boundaries that were screwed up when labour was in power.

  4. Joe Public says:

    “The Green Party are reduced to one MP”

    Nah. They recycled the old one.

  5. tchannon says:

    “The UK is now a failed state
    Why the SNP’s unprecedented landslide victory means an end to Union.

    08 May 2015 08:55 GMT”

    “Alistair Crighton

    http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2015/05/uk-failed-state-150508081114858.html

  6. Fanakapan says:

    Given that a Tory majority, however slim means there will be an EU Referendum, it seems the game is up for UKIP ?

  7. J Martin says:

    Here’s the breakdown of the votes cast/seat won:

    SNP 26,444
    CON 34,342
    LAB 40,232
    GRN 121,216
    LD 289,262
    UKIP 3,767,137

    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2015/05/08/newsbytes-uk-climate-minister-voted-out-green-libdems-wiped-out-in-election/#comment-1929043

    Not exactly a great advert for parliamentary representation.

  8. Zeke says:

    “Thanks to you and the nearly four million others who voted UKIP in yesterday’s General Election, we QUADRAUPLED our vote from the 2010 election.

    With nearly 4 million votes, UKIP is now the third largest party in British politics in terms of vote share.

    We held our seat in Clacton, and congratulations must go to the re-elected Douglas Carswell MP, and we scored a phenomenal number of second places – 120 all told (none in 2010) – proving that we’ve become the voice of opposition to the establishment.

    In many constituencies we are now the opposition, on behalf of ordinary people who have been neglected and taken for granted for decades.

    In places like Sunderland, Dagenham and Stoke we’ve proven ourselves to be the voice of reason, the voice of the people, and we are proud to have a solid foundation upon which to build and to restore real democracy.

    During the course of this election we fought a positive campaign and provided hope and truth for the electorate and driven the political agenda.

    However, it is disappointing that the country’s outdated voting system means nearly 4 million votes for UKIP translates into a minimal number of seats. The SNP needs just 25,000 votes to gain a seat and with it a disproportionate slice of power in Westminster, whereas over 3.5 million votes only translated to one seat for us.

    Now, more than ever, our electoral system looks broken and in need of fixing. The cause of electoral reform is something we will look to take up on behalf of the millions disenfranchised by the current system.

    Another cause close to our hearts is our continued campaign for Britain to be once again an independent, sovereign nation outside of the EU. We need your continued support if we are going to fulfil our aim of an in/out referendum, the terms of which we will of course have to scrutinise carefully.

    We believe that Britain is more than just a star on someone else’s flag.”
    emph added

    Comment: We have an electoral system here in the US, but that works well and the poplular vote has to be extremely close for it to make the difference. I do not know how it compares to the situation with UKIP.

  9. Fanakapan says:

    Zeke, so in the event of the 2017 referendum on the EU coming to pass, whats going to be the new platform of UKIP ?

    As for the voting system, we all had an opportunity about 4 years ago to vote on PR, the public rejected it😦 I dont see that issue being a runner again for a long time yet ?

  10. Preferential voting (as Australia’s Federal lower house and the lower houses in most states except Tasmania and ACT ) is the best system. With that system UKIP would have had more seats and may have been in coalition with the conservatives. In many seats where they came second they may have won seats on preferences from other parties. They would have also won a greater number of initial votes because those voting could pass on their preference to the next most liked (or next least disliked party) ie the conservatives. With preference voting the SNP would probably still have cleaned up in Scotland but would not have won as many seats.

  11. tchannon says:

    Referendum?

    Dracula in charge of the blood bank comes to mind.

  12. Like pg, @Roger Tattersall; congratulation! you have escaped the pillory of public office. Politics are much easier to practice from the outside. pg

    Roger,
    Now is time to decide if you wish to represent the will of your whole constituency, most of whom disagree with your personal convictions? Please try to get the winner as MP Pudsey, to often visit the TALKSHOP and ask questions of those few that do not know! -will-

  13. Zeke says:

    re: Fanakapan

    Q: “so in the event of the 2017 referendum on the EU coming to pass, whats going to be the new platform of UKIP ?”

    The fact that the referendum is on the political map at all at this time is because of the UK Independence Party. I am here in the US, so you know better than I do about Cameron’s very pro-EU position – along with all the other parties’.

    Nigel Farage has had to repeatedly point out that Cameron’s promises have been broken before, and that he has even offered to “renegotiate” the terms of Britain’s membership, and then offer an in-out referendum. This is impossible to do as a member of the EU; under the terms of the treaty there is no renegotiation. So I think Nigel Farage is responsible for getting the facts into the light, and presenting a British exit as a necessity.

    The short answer is, The presence of UKIP is what keeps this issue at the forefront. Nigel Farage is the only person who has been able to get through the thick pro-EU media, and communicate the truth about the real cost of being in a political union with Europe. There were many to chose from but here is an excellent clip:

    Farage: Germans keen to keep UK in EU, not Brits

  14. Zeke says:

    PS, UKIP policies included cutting green energy subsidies (for lagoons and more worthless wind turbines), abolishing the Climate Change Act, bringing back grammar schools, cutting foreign aid, and eliminating the tax on minimum wage so that it is an advantage to go back to work rather than use welfare.

  15. tallbloke says:

    Will J: Roger, Now is time to decide if you wish to represent the will of your whole constituency, most of whom disagree with your personal convictions

    Will, No politician represents the will of the whole of their whole constituency. Most of the people in my constituency have no idea what my personal convictions are, nor have they read UKIP’s manifesto. My job as a UKIP member is to raise awareness of what we actually stand for, rather than what the media misrepresents our positions to be. So no, I won’t become my conservative MP’s sidekick, despite your warped argument that I should.😉

    Tim C: Referendum? Dracula in charge of the blood bank comes to mind.

    Exactly. If we get the referendum on EU membership in 2017, Cameron will do his utmost to make sure it is rigged to keep the UK in the EU. UKIP has to fight the case for a free, fair, balanced referendum. That means raising awareness about funding, media bias, eligibility to vote etc.

  16. Richard111 says:

    Trying to find an official link that records total votes cast during the election with a break down of total votes cast for each party so I can work out the ‘percentage vote value’ of each parliamentary seat.
    Given the figures mentioned above this makes a mockery of the UK ‘democracy’.
    Would like to see total UKIP votes compared against each other party.
    Is this possible?

  17. Richard111 says:

    Pointed out the SNP result to my wife and she says “What do you expect with two fishy people in charge?”🙂

  18. Fanakapan says:

    There will be a Referendum on EU membership, Cameron has made too big a play of it to be in any way able to wriggle out of it.

    As for the terms, it seems hard to imagine how an in out plebiscite can have too many terms ?

    UKIP has had its day in the sun, it really is difficult to see how it can extend its life given that it is in essence a single issue party with a little window dressing to broaden its appeal.

  19. tallbloke says:

    Fanakapan clearly wishes UKIP would pack its bags and melt away. Which is a clear sign we’re on target. Amazing how much of our “window dressing” got adopted by the Tories in the election runup too. And of course, the Green Tories wouldn’t have offered an EU referendum at all if UKIP hadn’t been on the scene.

    Now we’ll keep the pressure on to ensure the referendum is fair. It only takes a couple of by-elections and defections and *poof*, there goes David Cameron’s majority.🙂

  20. J Martin says:

    @ Fanakapan. Well, we’ll see. UKIP had the only fully costed manifesto, various organisations found that the other parties manifesto’s didn’t balance financially. There would seem to be an ever growing number of disaffected voters looking for a third way. One third of people don’t bother to vote. A lot of the items in UKIPs manifesto make good sense but the other parties won’t address them out of PC, this will increase the likelyhood of defections. One of UKIPs biggest strengths is its ability to attract the immigrant and non white vote, both of which are growing in size.

    UKIPs biggest question mark is perhaps one of being perceived as not having people with experience in Government. If a prominent person experienced in finance could get airtime as the UKIP financial spokesman they could then be seen as a viable chancellor, then UKIPs vote can only grow.

    Pre election polling put UKIP as high as 18%, this didn’t materialise in the election, I suspect, because many voted to keep out red puppet Ed dangling on Scottish strings.

    The newspapers and BBC have been heavily biased against UKIP, but by increasing the number of non white and also lgbt candidates UKIP can disable a repeat of the mass brainwashing by the media. That sort of thing is banned in Australia several days before the election as it has been shown to influence voters. It is thought that in the UK JohnSmith lost an election because of it.

    A single issue party, absolutely not, though that ‘single issue’ now represents the views of 69% of the people. I am fervently pro European, nonetheless I voted for UKIP as I felt that the balance of their policies finally outweighed my pro European requirement.

    UKIP got 12.6% of the vote and can surely build on that.

    Given that UKIP has policies attractive to both Labour and Conservative voters, I doubt that the UKIP vote will be going away any time soon.

  21. Stephen Richards says:

    Fanakapan says:

    May 8, 2015 at 8:18 pm

    You need to read carefully the UKIP policies on their website. They are not a one policy party.

  22. Stephen Richards says:

    Fanakapan says:

    May 9, 2015 at 11:18 pm

    There will be a Referendum on EU membership, Cameron has made too big a play of it to be in any way able to wriggle out of it.

    As for the terms, it seems hard to imagine how an in out plebiscite can have too many terms ?

    How about giving the vote to 4.000.000 non brits otherwise known as immigrants.

  23. tchannon says:

    This is bizarre if true. The idea of having to vanish a tombstone PDQ is funny though.

    http://uk.reuters.com/article/2015/05/10/uk-britain-election-stone-idUKKBN0NV0RF20150510