RAF and heli pilots report close calls with uncharted Scottish wind turbines

Posted: September 20, 2015 by oldbrew in Energy, News, wind
Tags: ,

21st Century Scottish landscape

21st Century Scottish landscape


Wind Watch News highlights a press report on the problems faced by ‘low flyers’ due to large numbers of wind turbines sprouting up without warning near their flying routes over the Scottish mainland.

A “shocking” military dossier reveals a catalogue of potentially catastrophic air safety incidents, many of them related to unlit turbines and new or uncharted developments. However, the Ministry of Defence withheld more information on national security grounds meaning the real number could be much higher.

Last night, campaigners called for an urgent review of the mapping and lighting of wind turbines to prevent a fatal crash involving a low-flying aircraft. The 59 near-misses were classified from negligible to high in terms of severity with 15 cases – most of them from RAF Lossiemouth in Moray – in the high-risk category.


One Sea King helicopter captain revealed that search and rescue crews were having to manually update flight charts to keep pace with the renewables industry. He said: “Occasionally up to a hundred amendments per cycle are required to be plotted and this must be repeated on up to a dozen copies of some charts. If a chart is used by the aircrew or becomes dog eared that chart must be replaced and the amendments re-done. On average, over a thousand hand plotted and written amendments are required per month, taking many hours of work. Cumulatively over a period of months or years the task becomes mindless, very onerous and extremely prone to error.”

One third of the reports were made by pilots or ground crew from Lossiemouth, which is often used for low-level training flights over the Scottish mountains. A hazard report filed in September 2013 concerned an uncharted 300ft wind turbine, adding: “It is of particular concern as it is on the Inverurie Heli Lane into Aberdeen.” It also noted that a single turbine marked on their charts had been “developed into a wind farm with over 10 turbines”.

Others relate to temporary anemometer masts, which are erected to measure wind speed. One Sea King report said: “Over the course of a 5 day detachment to Glencorse Barracks, Edinburgh, several unlit anemometer masts up to approx. 200ft were sighted… The masts were thin and difficult to see by day, and would have been near impossible to see at night being unlit.”

Last night, Scotland Against Spin spokeswoman Linda Holt said the catalogue of “shocking” incidents represented only the “tip of the iceberg”. She added: “What about civilian aircraft, including private planes and helicopters, microlights and gliders? Aviation impact is yet another aspect of wind energy where public safety has been given short shrift.

“The problem of unmapped or unlit turbines and masts is the result of the subsidy-driven frenzy in speculative wind development since 2008. “We know of a number of turbines and masts where aviation lights have not been fitted, or fail to function, despite being required by planning conditions. Taken together with inadequate mapping, it is only a matter of time before these unlit hazards cause fatal accidents.”

Full report here: Air disaster in the making: RAF pilots have almost 60 close-calls with wind farm | Wind Energy News (from the Sunday Express)

Comments
  1. Kevin Lohse says:

    Thats the problem with alien plants introduced into the environment without adequate pre-testing and protective measures. They start off in plantations and farms, but before you know it they’re sprouting up wild all over the place.

  2. Joe Public says:

    Blackpool has its ‘Illuminations”; all turbines should have bright LEDs at the blade tips.

    It’d be a useful visitor attraction.

    /sarc.

  3. ivan says:

    That does point to a use for them – target practice for the RAF.

  4. ivan says: September 20, 2015 at 11:03 pm

    “That does point to a use for them – target practice for the RAF.”

    Please, on for three rotations, off for one rotation, cycling between the three tips! The birdies will figure it out, maybe even the RAF.🙂

  5. Joe Public says: September 20, 2015 at 8:27 pm

    “Blackpool has its ‘Illuminations”; all turbines should have bright LEDs at the blade tips. It’d be a useful visitor attraction. /sarc. ”

    Blade 1: on for two rotations, off for one rotation. Blade 2: on for three rotations, off for one rotation. Blade 3: on for four rotations, off for one rotation. Please explain the circular intermodulation, and how it looks; from a far off bird POV; or from the POV of each blade tip; or from the POV of the Hub; rotating, not rotating; or best from an inertial reference POV high above the ecliptic! We tried to offer understanding. Earthlings did this to themselves!
    Not an all knowing GOD, so boring! Our outstanding “I wonder if” GOD! I doubt our God even thought of horse racing!
    All the best! -will-

  6. Stephen Richards says:

    In France several wind projects have been stopped for this reason. We have couloire militaire (military corridors) which cannot be compromised. Ironically it’s the bloody german wind companies that are invading France.

  7. I feel very sorry for these pilots, in the same way as the bird mincers will sooner or later get most large birds, sooner or later one will be killed.

  8. oldbrew says:

    ‘A hazard report filed in September 2013 concerned an uncharted 300ft wind turbine’

    How many more of those are there?

    ‘On average, over a thousand hand plotted and written amendments are required per month, taking many hours of work.’

    There’s a clue.