China: Wind turbines aren’t working, causing HUGE problems 

Posted: June 30, 2016 by oldbrew in turbines, Uncertainty, wind
Tags: ,

Chinese wind power [image credit: clearwinds.co.uk]

Chinese wind power [image credit: clearwinds.co.uk]


Even if the turbines themselves are in working order, unreliable intermittent wind power remote from the areas of densest population can cause havoc to China’s power grid system, as Andrew Follett reports in the Daily Caller.

The government stopped approving new wind power projects in the country’s windiest regions in early March, according to China’s National Energy Administration statement. These regions previously installed nearly 71 gigawatts of wind turbines, more than the rest of China combined.

A single gigawatt of electricity is enough to power 700,000 homes. Government statistics show that 33.9 billion kilowatt-hours of wind-power, or about 15 percent of all Chinese wind power, was wasted in 2015 alone.

Beijing has ordered wind operators to stop expanding four times in the last five years, because unreliable wind power was damaging the country’s power grid and costing the government enormous amounts of money. The best areas for wind turbines in China are far away from the coastal provinces where most of its population lives.

Building the infrastructure to transmit wind energy over long distances is enormously expensive and could cost many times the price of generating the electricity. Despite the freeze on new wind-farms, the Chinese government still plans to get 15 percent of the country’s electricity from green energy by 2020.

Wind power damages the power grid because the amount of electricity generated by a wind turbine is very intermittent and doesn’t coincide with the times of day when power is most needed. This poses an enormous safety challenge to grid operators and makes power grids vastly more fragile.

Source: China: Wind Turbines Aren’t Working, Causing HUGE Problems | The Daily Caller

Talkshop note: these problems are happening even with wind providing a lot less than 15% of the power of the whole Chinese grid system.

Comments
  1. Eventually the world is going to want reparations for the “solutions”/”transformations”…

  2. oldbrew says:

    ‘Government statistics show that 33.9 billion kilowatt-hours of wind-power, or about 15 percent of all Chinese wind power, was wasted in 2015 alone.’

    Staggering wastage figures – either they expected this or not. You’d have to think not.

  3. […] Source: China: Wind turbines aren’t working, causing HUGE problems  | Tallbloke’s Talkshop […]

  4. Climatism says:

    Reblogged this on Climatism and commented:
    Cough, cough, splutter. Nothing to see here. Moving right along.

  5. oldbrew says:

    Obviously the problems in China are going to be experienced (to varying degrees) in other countries that try to push wind power beyond being a small percentage of the input to their national power grids.

  6. Bitter& Twisted says:

    What do they expect?
    The coal and oil replaced windmills starting around 1850.
    The reason this happened are for exactly the same reasons as today.
    Low power density
    Intermittent supply
    Unreliable

    Calling them “turbines” and “green” does not address these key issues.

  7. oldbrew says:

    Loop flows: Why is wind power from northern Germany putting east European grids under pressure?
    http://www.cleanenergywire.org/factsheets/loop-flows-why-wind-power-northern-germany-putting-east-european-grids-under-pressure

    ‘Germany is producing ever-more green power. But grid development hasn’t kept up with the expansion of renewables, meaning excess electricity is spilling over into neighbouring countries and causing headaches for east European grid regulators.’

    ‘The Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) has estimated that loop flows from Germany cost the Polish and Czech economies 25 million euros a year in lost revenues from power trading.’

    These problems (re. Polish and Czech exports of their own surplus electricity) look like getting worse as Germany goes on throwing money at (mainly) North Sea and Baltic wind power.

  8. markstoval says:

    oldbrew says:

    “Obviously the problems in China are going to be experienced (to varying degrees) in other countries that try to push wind power beyond being a small percentage of the input to their national power grids.”

    I have trouble seeing wind power being of any use at all, other than perhaps in inaccessible places where wind might be the only option.

    After one factors in the cost of manufacture (in energy units), cost of transportation and installation, and then ongoing maintenance — how could wind power save on CO2 emissions? I mean, that is what all this nonsense is about, right? Emissions?

    In addition to that, I am of the understanding that wind makes almost no economic sense at all.

  9. Tenuc says:

    Wind is proving uneconomic and lots of countries, including the UK, are having second thoughts.

    I always felt that wave/tidal could be a better option, but the failed Aquamarine Orkney pilot wave energy plant failed to deliver and stopped trading at the end of last year.2015. Perhaps the Severn tidal barrier generation project could be economic, if the can sort out the politics of the green issues.

    Not looking good for alternative energy in the UK. We should be fracking and investing in natural gas fired steam turbine generation.

  10. Mjw says:

    Tenacious: They are two wrecked wave generators clogging up beaches in South Australia and Newcastle NSW and I have a feeling there may be another one in WA.

  11. gallopingcamel says:

    As “oldbrew” says the Germans are in even worse shape that the Chinese. Expect a widespread failure of the German electrical grid………………soon:
    http://notrickszone.com/category/alternative-energy/#sthash.Ja0fTvAR.dpbs

    [mod] that’s a link to a site category, perhaps this is the most relevant recent post:
    http://notrickszone.com/2016/06/27/red-blood-on-green-hands-germanys-energiewende-turns-into-a-wrecking-ball-the-rescue-that-isnt/

  12. oldbrew says:

    Tenuc says: ‘Perhaps the Severn tidal barrier generation project could be economic, if they can sort out the politics of the green issues.’

    If the wrangling over Heathrow expansion is an example, a Severn barrier project would sink into the mire of political arguments for decades – if it hasn’t done so already.

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