We’re all going on our,,, summer holidays – have this open thread

Posted: July 8, 2017 by tallbloke in Blog

Stuart ‘Oldbrew’ is off sunning himself with some old mates for the next 10 days and I’m off to do more work on the ‘petite ruine’ my lovely lady and I acquired in southern Brittany last year. Neither of us will have much internet access.

house-june16

The Talkshop will have to run itself for the duration. Various people have been given a moderation amnesty. Play nice and enjoy a free ranging debate about anything on this open thread.

When we’re back, I’m going to start a series of posts rebutting various objections to Ned and Karl’s Pressure Warming Effect theory.

Stuart will be posting on a remarkable discovery he’s made about the dancing moons of the outer solar system.

Much good cutting edge science for us all to discuss. – Cheers!

Comments
  1. Stephen Richards says:

    broadband is awful in france unless you live in a grande ville. I’m 13Kms from one town going south and 22kms from another going north and 18 from another going west. I’m on a departmental route and I never see 2m.

    Your place is in the Morbihan isn’t it?

  2. tallbloke says:

    Hi Stephen. Yes, Morbihan. There’s some free wifi at the town campsite 8km down the road. There is mobile broadband where we are, but I can’t afford it on a UK simcard. The Marie told us wired broadband is coming… in 2027. 🙂

  3. tallbloke says:

    New commenters are automatically held in moderation, so apologies in advance if your comment is late appearing.

  4. Bon voyage. We are going to miss you!

    On the Internet issue I was amazed by the quality of Internet services available in Benalmadena (Spain) when I was on vacation in February 2016:
    Up rate = 300 Mbps, Down rate = 300 Mbps, Cost = $34.20 per month

    The same bit rates were available in Queretaro (Mexico) when I was on another vacation in November 2016. The cost was……………….$30.48 per month!

  5. Curious George says:

    Wifi in 2027. France is approaching a real socialism. My dad lived in Brno in the Czechoslovak Socialistic Republic, was told he had to wait for a phone line for 18 years. Fortunately, the end of Communism came first.

  6. RoswellJohn says:

    Morbihan was my favorite area of Brittany when I visited about 11 years ago. Lots of standing stones to figure out!!! Have fun remodeling.

  7. tallbloke says:

    Yes! Some beautiful megalithic sites are nearby in the Broceliande region. This one is just a few Km up the road

  8. The Badger says:

    Whatever happened to R.Graeff? Is he still doing experiments, his website is not active.

  9. Ned Nikolov says:

    These multi-ton standing stones (called menhirs) are found all over the world along with other more advanced megalithic structures…This is another fascinating story (perhaps even more interesting than the climate debate), but the available archaeological evidence on megaliths points to the existence of a prehistoric technologically highly advanced civilization that was likely wiped off by a global cataclysm at the end of last Ice Age or beginning of the Holocene.

    The official version of human history given to us by mainstream archaeology may be as wrong as the ‘greenhouse concept’ supported by the official climatology! We are living in a time of shifting paradigms throughout many fields of science …:)

  10. tallbloke says:

    Ned: Yes, these ones are the Menhirs de Monteneuf. One of our contributors here ‘OldmanK’ has written an excellent book on the amazing structures on Malta. I must get around to reviewing it. He says the alignments worldwide prove that Obliquity has changed fast in the recent past.

    Badger: Don’t know. Lucy Skywalker visited him, and said he was getting very old…

  11. Zeke says:

    “The Carnac stones (Breton: Steudadoù Karnag) are an exceptionally dense collection of megalithic sites around the village of Carnac in Brittany, consisting of alignments, dolmens, tumuli and single menhirs.

    More than 3,000 prehistoric standing stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre/proto-Celtic people of Brittany, and form the largest such collection in the world. Most of the stones are within the Breton village of Carnac, but some to the east are within La Trinité-sur-Mer. The stones were erected at some stage during the Neolithic period, probably around 3300 BCE, but some may date to as early as 4500 BCE.”

  12. Zeke says:

    Looking very similar to the ones in tallbloke’s picture.

  13. Ned Nikolov says:

    Zeke,

    Yes, the Carnac stones are famous, and really no one knows, when they were erected, because we do not currently have reliable methods to date stone cutting. Dating usually relies on pieces of ceramics found at the megalithic sites that are dated using carbon 14, and then an assumption is made that the ceramic is from the time of the stone builders …

  14. From what I have read the stones in France and England are not that old (maybe 3000-3500BC). In Turkey and Isreal buildings with polished concrete floors have been excavated. The date is around 7000 BC. My belief these concrete floors were of burnt lime (with some impurity) and limestone aggregate. I think the concrete after placement was set by lighting a fire at one entrance and drawing the combustion gases over the concrete to carbonise the surface, then it was polished with smooth rocks. Compression tests on samples of the concrete ranged from 30 to 60 MPa ( as good as concrete today). At the Turkish site objects of lead which was the first metal ever processed were found -things like weights for scales, round pieces with holes that could be used for plumb bobs etc.
    Galena is often found in limestone. I have seen that in at limestone quarry in the Hope valley. The lead may have been made by accident when producing the lime.

  15. Stephen Richards says:

    Roger, orange do a pay as you go broadband by mobile. Last I saw it was quite reasonable. Buy the dongle and 30€ worth of time.

  16. Stephen Richards says:

    In france, any town or village with a name ending in -ac is said to be established by the gauls. They were making pots and metal from pre roman I believe

  17. Stephen Richards says:

    Just checked roger. 40€ for the wifi ports and not in stock, buggered

  18. tallbloke says:

    Stephen R: In france, any town or village with a name ending in -ac is said to be established by the gauls. They were making pots and metal from pre roman I believe.

    Our place is a few Km from Ruffiac, the ground of my ancestors. The family donated a farm to the monks of Redon Abbey there in AD 852.

  19. ivan says:

    Roger, using your UK SIM over here in France shouldn’t cost any more than using it in the UK since roaming charges are now a thing of the past (at least that is the info I got from Tesco Mobile about my UK number that is reserved for use when I’m in the UK).

  20. tallbloke says:

    Ivan: thanks, I’ll check.

  21. J Martin says:

    I use a Three sim when in France and pay 1p per MB, so I don’t bother with free WiFi when I come across it. Previously I bought a data package to get that, but now that roaming charges gave gone I think I should get the same 1p per MB without having to buy a data package.

  22. Stephen Richards says:

    Stephen R: In france, any town or village with a name ending in -ac is said to be established by the gauls. They were making pots and metal from pre roman I believe.
    Our place is a few Km from Ruffiac, the ground of my ancestors. The family donated a farm to the monks of Redon Abbey there in AD 852.

    WOW

  23. Zeke says:

    Ned Nikolov says: “Yes, the Carnac stones are famous, and really no one knows, when they were erected, because we do not currently have reliable methods to date stone cutting. Dating usually relies on pieces of ceramics found at the megalithic sites that are dated using carbon 14, and then an assumption is made that the ceramic is from the time of the stone builders …”

    Ceramic shards are a really reliable means of dating any layer. If you like the conclusion they reach. If not, then you wonder if they picked the right rim of the right pot for the right era for the right style.

  24. Zeke says:

    Tallbloke says, “Our place is a few Km from Ruffiac, the ground of my ancestors. The family donated a farm to the monks of Redon Abbey there in AD 852.”

    The trick is not to get 1066ed. (:

  25. tallbloke says:

    Actually, it was my lot that did part of the 1066ing. A third of the force that came over with Guillaume le Conquerant was Breton. They were heading back to their ancestral lands to kick Saxon arse and reclaim their heritage.

  26. There are many techniques now available for dating. One is luminescence of quartz see here https://www.thoughtco.com/luminescence-dating-cosmic-method-171538. Stonehenge has been dated and before the stones were placed there wooden posts in a circle.. The statues on Easter Island have been dated. Nothing technically special about either.

  27. Zeke says:

    tallbloke says, “Actually, it was my lot that did part of the 1066ing. A third of the force that came over with Guillaume le Conquerant was Breton. They were heading back to their ancestral lands to kick Saxon arse and reclaim their heritage.”

    Hm. Alright then. I will raise a glass to the various predecessors of the Tallbloke Clan who mixed and mingled with the English-speakers. And I will drink further to the fact French and Latin languages became a distant memory in England.

    “HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE 2 English Goes Underground doc series” dur 50 min

    Based on the book by Melvyn Bragg

  28. Zeke says:

    Sorry, that was episode 1. This is part 2:

    But it is better after watching the developments under King Alfred the Great, who began a series of efforts to bring literacy in the English language, even to plough boys, at a time when all written works were in Latin, a dead language. Now I found this in one of my grandfather’s books:

    John Barbour. d. 1395

    Freedom

    A! Fredome is a noble thing!
    Fredome mays man to haiff liking;
    Fredome all solace to man giffis,
    He levys at ese that frely levys!
    A noble hart may haiff nane ese,
    Na ellys nocht that may him plese,
    Gyff fredome fail; for fre liking
    Is yarnyt our all othir thing.
    Na he that ay has levyt fre
    May nocht knaw weill the propyrtè,
    The angyr, na the wretchyt dome
    That is couplyt to foule thyrldome.
    Bot gyff he had assayit it,
    Than all perquer he suld it wyt;
    And suld think fredome mar to prise
    Than all the gold in warld that is.
    Thus contrar thingis evirmar
    Discoweryngis off the tothir ar.

  29. Zeke says:

    I just threw the poem in because we are all celebrating in June and July! 😎

    Cementafriend says ” In Turkey and Isreal buildings with polished concrete floors have been excavated. The date is around 7000 BC. My belief these concrete floors were of burnt lime (with some impurity) and limestone aggregate. I think the concrete after placement was set by lighting a fire at one entrance and drawing the combustion gases over the concrete to carbonise the surface, then it was polished with smooth rocks. Compression tests on samples of the concrete ranged from 30 to 60 MPa ( as good as concrete today).”

    That is going into my notes. I am glad to run into the guy who loves cement and its admirable history, esp. pre-Roman, because it surely does have a pre-roman history.

  30. oldbrew says:

    Global Warming Derangement Syndrome: Please Make It Stop
    KERRY JACKSON 7/19/2017

    In the 2000s, there was Bush Derangement Syndrome, but it faded after Barack Obama was elected. Then came Trump Derangement Syndrome after it turned out that it wasn’t Hillary Clinton’s turn after all. It, too, will fade after Donald Trump is either voted out of office or serves two terms.

    Yet with us always and forever, it seems, is the Global Warming Derangement Syndrome.

    http://www.investors.com/politics/commentary/global-warming-derangement-syndrome-please-make-it-stop/

  31. tom0mason says:

    For the latest look at what 12 weather models are saying about the likely Autumn weather for the UK, have a look at gavsweathervids.com latest video at https://www.youtube.com/embed/BKSkmhEJnc8?ecver=1. These models are from weather outlets across the world from Brazil to Russia, Germany to Korea and Japan, and many others!
    The vast majority of these models incorporate climate model information, thus they are indicating warmer than usual temperatures (but that is what they usually say — and often correct themselves in the shorter term as they’ll have it wrong) but overall there is no reliable pattern to pick from these all these models’ predictions. By the way ALL of them will update before any of the events they predict happen, and so NONE of them should be taken as any more accurate than a guess.

    IMO, as a piece of entertainment these weather models are as interesting as and TV soap opera.
    So what is your guess for the Autumn weather. (I’m going for average temperatures but more rain.)

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