Global agricultural boom: a million thanks to climate change

Posted: December 15, 2017 by oldbrew in alarmism, climate, Critique, Temperature
Tags: , ,

Planting rice [image credit: BBC]


As the report concludes: ‘Both global warming and carbon dioxide have benefitted plant growth, and both are important contributors to the success of modern civilization.’

Global cereal (grain) production has reached record levels in 2017, says The GWPF.

Credit for the increase usually goes to agrochemicals and other advanced agricultural technology. However, there are two other key contributors — carbon dioxide and climate change.

World cereal production for 2017 is projected to reach 2,613.3 million tons, 5.8 million tons above 2016’s level and nearly one-fourth higher than 2008’s. Despite population growth, production per capita rose 13 percent over the last decade, from 0.31 to 0.35 tons per person.

Production of all the world’s staple food crops — such as rice, wheat, and other coarse grains like millet — has risen in the past decade.

Comparison with the period before 2008 is even more startling.

The global food production index — an index of crops considered edible and nutritious — has risen steadily in the past six decades. Doubling from 1983 to 2008, it grew more than twice as fast as population and has continued to rise.

Rice production, for example, rose almost 30 percent from 361.33 million tons in 1990 to around 506.5 million in 2017.

Yet climate alarmist scientists, politicians, and mainstream media claim that climate change would hinder global agricultural production.

There are two key reasons their claims are false — exaggeration of climate change and misconceptions regarding the biological impact of carbon dioxide.

The change in global average temperature has in fact been beneficial to life during the past 2,000 years. Global temperatures during the Roman Warm Period (around 0 A.D.) and the Medieval Warm Period (around 1000 A.D.) greatly aided human life by enhancing crop growth. The Modern Warm Period we are experiencing is in fact very similar to these earlier warm periods.

Global agricultural production suffered only during cold periods, including the Little Ice Age, which ended around the late 18th or early 19th century.

Since the 1800s, the earth has been warming — returning to levels ideal for crop production. It is remarkable that the mainstream media can claim that temperatures are killing crops when they have actually contributed to exponential growth of crop yields.

A second major reason for unprecedented growth in global vegetation, including crop yields, has been the increase in carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere during the past few centuries.

Increasing carbon dioxide has been a major driver of plant growth since the Little Ice Age. It contributed roughly $3.2 trillion worth of crop yield in 1960–2011 and can be expected to contribute another $9.8 trillion by 2050.

In other words, carbon dioxide is the elixir of life. But climate alarmists wrongly brand it a pollutant.

Continued here.

Comments
  1. oldbrew says:

    Not forgetting inorganic fertilizers which ‘are synthetic and typically made from petroleum’.

    http://homeguides.sfgate.com/types-inorganic-fertilizers-39293.html
    – – –
    How many people does synthetic fertilizer feed?
    November 07, 2017 by Hannah Ritchie

    In fact, it’s estimated that nitrogen fertilizer now supports approximately half of the global population.

    http://ourworldindata.org/how-many-people-does-synthetic-fertlizer-feed/

  2. JB says:

    As I read the Harris-Mann Climatology plot, the last two warm periods were not near as long nor as high as the Medieval and Roman periods. All one can really say is lately its been almost as warm for a brief while (1/3 the previous durations) than it was 600-700 years ago.

    What bothers me is the slope of the cold periods since 1700 BC is a constant downward trend with no variation. If unabated, we’re in for a very nasty cold period not seen since ~8000BCE. Instead of bellyachin about how warm its been, we should have been stocking up like Yusuf, the Vizier of Egypt against the reduction of arable land. Coal is likely to become the black gold of our descendants and grains the mainstay of civilization.

  3. Bitter&twisted says:

    I’m waiting to hear this good news reported by the BBC.
    P.S. I am not holding my breath.

  4. oldmanK says:

    From JB, quote: “Coal is likely to become the black gold of our descendants and grains the mainstay of civilization.” I don’t know about coal, but I assure you grains have been the mainstay of civilisation for the past 8000 years. In fact it is the cereals that created civilisation.

  5. Jamie Spry says:

    Reblogged this on Climatism and commented:
    “Global agricultural production suffered only during cold periods, including the Little Ice Age, which ended around the late 18th or early 19th century.

    Since the 1800s, the earth has been warming — returning to levels ideal for crop production. It is remarkable that the mainstream media can claim that temperatures are killing crops when they have actually contributed to exponential growth of crop yields.”

    A rather unwelcome message for the anti-CO2, misanthropic environmental movement.

  6. oldbrew says:

    What’s at Stake in US Adoption of Climate Alarmist Policies
    Alan Carlin December 15, 2017

    It is all too easy to forget what is at stake in the attempts by the Obama Administration and climate alarmists to implement climate alarmist policies in the US. One of the primary issues is whether the US would be wise to greatly increase the cost of energy used in the US by making it both much more expensive and much less reliable. A number of developed countries have already done so with very adverse results.

    http://www.carlineconomics.com/archives/4090

  7. craigm350 says:

    Reblogged this on WeatherAction News and commented:
    Increasing carbon dioxide has been a major driver of plant growth since the Little Ice Age. It contributed roughly $3.2 trillion worth of crop yield in 1960–2011 and can be expected to contribute another $9.8 trillion by 2050.

    In other words, carbon dioxide is the elixir of life.

  8. ivan says:

    Strange that commercial growers with greenhouses have known this for years, and exploited it, yet the ‘climate scientists’ haven’t a clue. Someone with an enquiring mind might think those ‘scientists’ were pushing an agenda rather than looking at facts.

    Anyone would think the climate is trying to tell them something but I doubt they will learn from it.