Benny Peiser and Matt Ridley: Bad weather is no reason for climate alarm

Posted: January 13, 2018 by oldbrew in alarmism, climate, Natural Variation, opinion, weather
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Credit: planetsave.com


H/T The GWPF

Trump was more likely winding up the over-zealous climate alarmists, rather than being confused about anything.

Two weeks ago, President Donald Trump greeted the cold snap that was gripping much of the U.S. by tweeting, “Perhaps we could use a little bit of that good old Global Warming.” He was criticized for confusing weather with climate.

But he’s hardly alone in making this mistake say Peiser and Ridley, as we have seen in coverage of the most destructive weather-related events of 2017.

The past year was filled with bad weather news, much of it tragic, with whole communities even now still struggling to recover.

Hurricane Harvey hit Texas, and Hurricane Irma struck Florida and Puerto Rico after devastating other Caribbean islands. Wildfires torched the dry expanses of Napa and Ventura counties in California, and Australia experienced severe heat waves.

It has become routine for the media, politicians and activists to link such awful events with climate change. The basic claim is that the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is causing more extreme weather of every kind—more droughts, floods and hurricanes. This comes in addition to concerns that a rise in global temperatures will have potentially dire effects in the long term on polar ice and sea levels.

By looking at the world as a whole, however, and at long-term trends (climate) rather than at short-term events (weather), we can better test the claims that 2017 was an unusual weather year and that weather is getting more extreme as the world warms. This global and long-term view also puts other possible threats from climate change in perspective.

While the U.S. witnessed record damages in 2017, the rest of the world was actually hit by far fewer natural disasters than usual.

On average, the globe suffers some 325 catastrophic natural disasters a year, but last year (through November) they were down to around 250, according to the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters at the University of Leuven in Belgium. A third fewer people were killed by climate-related hazards, according to the Centre’s International Disaster Database.

As for major weather events and the most prominent indicators of long-term climate trends, here is a rough scorecard for 2017:

Continued here.

Comments
  1. JB says:

    Petty Tweeters. Trump was not my choice; he doesn’t have the dignity for the office. However, it takes a good lot of intelligence to be an accomplished clown. Trump is no Chance, the Gardner. He knows how to get under people’s skin forthwith.

  2. Bitter@twisted says:

    And how is this relevant?

  3. oldbrew says:

    Busy hurricane season in the North Atlantic, elsewhere – not so much.


    [GWPF]

  4. ren says:

    Polar vortex in the lower stratosphere.

  5. oldbrew says:

    NASA TO STUDY WEATHER IN BOUNDARY LAYER BETWEEN EARTH AND SPACE
    by CURT GODWIN – JANUARY 14TH, 2018

    “We used to think only solar wind could affect the ionosphere, and only the lower atmosphere was affected by terrestrial weather,” stated Doug Rowland, ICON mission scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in the release. “But now we’re going to get to see how that energy couples together.”

    Read more at http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/organizations/nasa/nasa-study-weather-boundary-layer-earth-space/

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