Macron lectures on global warming at Davos as France misses climate targets 

Posted: January 25, 2018 by oldbrew in Nuclear power, Politics, propaganda
Tags: , , , ,

France’s President Macron at Davos


France’s virtue-signalling anti-coal pledge may sound grand, but as the report points out it ‘only has three power plants that burn coal’, providing 1% of its electricity. Another potential problem for France is the inflexibility of nuclear power, which is not suitable for rapid ramping up and down in response to changes in demand and/or short-term fluctuations in renewable energy. In February 2017 the German nuclear plant at Brokdorf was taken offline after the operation of the plant in “load-following” mode had contributed to unexpected oxidation of its fuel rods.

France failed to meet its global warming target, as The Daily Caller reports.

French President Emmanuel Macron made global warming a central part of his World Economic Forum speech on Wednesday in Davos, pledging to close all of his country’s coal-fired power plants by 2021.

Macron’s anti-coal pledge comes as Ecology Minister Nicolas Hulot announced France failed to meet its 2016 global warming target to limit greenhouse gas emissions to 447 million metric tons.

Hulot said France would revise its global warming targets to better align with its Paris climate accord commitment to go “carbon neutral” by 2050, Reuters reported.

Macron has been one of the most vocal supporters of the Paris climate accord, which went into effect in 2016.

Continued here.
– – –

Energy Transition: Does the French nuclear fleet ramp to make space for solar and wind?

Comments
  1. A C Osborn says:

    Why on earth would the Industrialised Country with the lowest CO2 output in the world want to cut it in the first place.
    The force is strong in these imbeciles.

  2. JB says:

    Er, the farce is strong….

  3. oldbrew says:

    ACO: see the intro. Nuclear is no good for load-following i.e. backing up intermittent and unpredictable renewable energy. And coal is doomed in France.

    France will have to build some gas-fired power stations as its nuclear dies of old age, unless it can come up with a better idea. That wouldn’t be to chop down and burn other people’s forests.

  4. pochas94 says:

    I nominate narcissism as the great enemy of progress. The narcissist struts and frets, “it is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.” Of course, who but a narcissist would run for President? Redeeming qualities are a sine qua non.

  5. oldbrew says:

    ‘Global warming’ piling up in Japan…

    After Tokyo’s Heaviest Snow in Four Years and Coldest Temperature in 48 Years, Feet of Sea-Effect Snow Continue to Pile Up in Parts of Japan

    Tokyo experienced its heaviest snowfall in four years on Monday, and other parts of Japan will see sea-effect snow pile up through this week. This weather pattern also allowed Tokyo to experience its coldest temperature in 48 years this week.

    http://weather.com/news/weather/news/2018-01-23-tokyo-heaviest-snow-in-four-years-sea-effect-snow-japan

  6. oldbrew says:

    Sick bags at the ready…

    Davos’d from reality: Global elite practice nothing but green hypocrisy at alpine summit

    Private jets, personal helicopters, fleets of limousines and canapés made from shark. No, this isn’t a Rich Kids of Instagram shopping list. It’s a weekend in the life of one of the many billionaires preaching the Green Lobby’s agenda at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos this year.

    Read more: http://green-watch.net/davosd-from-reality-global-elite-practice-nothing-but-green-hypocrisy-at-alpine-summit-8fcf67685560

  7. Nuclear can do load follow, as designed for a normal predictable demand situation. Introducing intermittent and unpredictable renewables from wind and solar is a folly of the greatest stupidity.

  8. A C Osborn says:

    Yup.

  9. oldbrew says:

    ‘Introducing intermittent and unpredictable renewables from wind and solar is a folly of the greatest stupidity.’

    Yes, this is why France with all its nuclear plants has or will have a problem moving to more renewables, as Craig Morris pointed out.

    In short:

    We have no evidence of any nuclear fleet in the world ramping down and back up by more than roughly a third every day. (But please use the comment box below if you know more.)
    .
    Wind and solar will eventually push the conventional fleet down to 0% on a daily basis, so we need backup plants that can do that and come back up again.
    .
    What’s more, proponents of nuclear make claims about a technology’s potential based on the exceptional performance of single units.

    http://energytransition.org/2017/05/does-the-french-nuclear-fleet-ramp-to-make-space-for-solar-and-wind/

  10. tom0mason says:

    With Merkel too busy in Germany frantically trying to meld some form of government from any of the dispret political and social parties of her nation, the part of voicing and reinforcing EU interests falls to the Mekon Macron.
    So he’s just acting as a mere functionary to the unelected EU elites of the mighty European Council. He’s just virtue signaling their crony capitalistic desires. Mouthing pledges that are as practical, and have all the substance as knitted smoke. So far it looks like the EU elite wants to be beholden to Vladimir Putin and his Russian gas, I wonder how the backhanders work in that deal?

  11. Graeme No.3 says:

    The French idea is to replace about a third of their nuclear power with wind turbines to reduce emissions? How does that work?
    The French nuclear does do some load following as their plants are of 3 sorts. The oldest just keep running, the second sort modify output with control rods etc. and the third type just send steam direct to the cooling towers bypassing the steam turbine. If output is still too high then they can drop the price and Switzerland (and others) can use it for pumped storage.
    The problem with their plan is that too much wind will force a price drop making the remaining nuclear unprofitable. Alternatively not enough wind with force France to buy on a market with other wind believers also increasing demand (which won’t reduce the cost).

  12. stpaulchuck says:

    here’s a golden quote that nails AGW
    —————————
    “Much of the social history of the Western world, over the past three decades, has been a history of replacing what worked with what sounded good” – Thomas Sowell

  13. ren says:

    After heavy snowfall in the Pyrenees, very heavy snowfall begins in the French Alps.

  14. pochas94 says:

    Always amazed that the French were among the first to include nuclear as an important part of their electric utility structure. Lets hope they haven’t lost their senses.

  15. Jim says:

    The main problem with steam diversion from the turbines, is keeping the blades warm. The thermal shock induces microfractures. Creating failure points. You don’t want that in a nuke plant. Sooner or later a failure will occur.

  16. oldbrew says:

    Overheating planet news…

    Eerie scenes as animals FREEZE SOLID as temperatures drop to MINUS 68F/-56C in Kazakhstan

    WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT
    Videos show a hare and a dog frozen to death amid minus 56C temperatures
    The animals were found dead as arctic conditions swept across Kazakhstan
    Hare died after being trapped in a fence while dog became stuck in a snow field

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5310825/Animals-FROZEN-SOLID-amid-56C-conditions-Kazakhstan.html

    ‘arctic conditions’ – would that be cold air from the ‘rapidly melting’ Arctic or from some other place :/

  17. Curious George says:

    France’s problem is that they don’t know how to replace a reliable grid with an unreliable one.

    [reply] exactly

  18. michael hart says:

    Green crazies apart, I think one of the key problems is that a stable system producing low cost energy into the foreseeable future…doesn’t produce exciting projected financial returns.

    While I fully support capitalism, there will always be those who wish to destabilise the current status quo in a given market for selfish reasons. Energy, like water supply, is an essential commodity, but with low growth potential. So what would operators in that market do? They will try to disrupt the functioning market, à la Enron. It seems like the most logical explanation of why the French ‘government’ would want to change from an existing system of cheap electricity supply to one of expensive electricity supply when even global-warming mantra says that it is insane.

    Carbon dioxide targets be damned, the French approach strikes me as the most insane at the moment. And that includes the insanity of Germany, California and South Australia. They will not feel the pain as soon, maybe, but their incredibly steep descent from a comfortable place will make for good viewing.