Wear white on the solstice to celebrate polar bear success in a warming world

Posted: June 20, 2018 by oldbrew in alarmism, predictions, propaganda
Tags: ,

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Add polar bear non-decline to the long list of climate alarms that the doomsters have got embarrassingly wrong.

polarbearscience

Wednesday 21 June is the longest day of the year: wear something white tomorrow to acknowledge and celebrate the success of polar bears despite such low summer sea ice since 2007 that 2/3 of them were predicted to disappear.

white sunglassesWhite hats

White tie, white shirt, white socks work too. Keep cool and signal to the world that you love outstanding survivors of climate change,  fat though they may be.

Cover image_Twenty Reasons_polarbearscience

Read here and here.

Global sea ice extent at 19 June 2018, well past the end of the intensive spring feeding period for polar bears:

masie_all_zoom_4km 2018 June 19

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Comments
  1. Richard111 says:

    Hmmm… my calendar says June 21st is today. Thursday!

    [reply] yes, the author has slipped up there 😦

  2. Annie says:

    Hmmm! It’s the winter Solstice DownUnder…nothing white that’s warm enough. A nice polar bear coat would be welcome first thing in the morning. Our mins. have been varying between -2 and +1 or 2 or 3. We sometimes have -5/6C.
    I’ve just remembered that I have a pair of cheap Tesco white gloves!

  3. dennisambler says:

    These Polar Bears are just enjoying the Summer sun, no ice in sight. Just think what Al Gore could do with this pic!

    http://churchillpolarbears.org/2018/06/polar-bears-on-the-rocks/

    This outfit do Polar Bear tours in conjunction with WWF, still offering a full programme so they haven’t run out of bears yet.

    https://www.nathab.com/polar-bear-tours/

  4. oldbrew says:

    No polar bear references here, but…

    Semiannual Variation of Geomagnetic Activity

    C.T. RUSSELL AND R. L. MCPHERRON

    As expected, the peak activity occurs in March and September, minimum activity in December and June.

    http://www-ssc.igpp.ucla.edu/personnel/russell/papers/40/

    Auroras are generally strongest at the equinoxes, weakest at the solstices. Since the Sun probably doesn’t know what time of year it is on Earth, the obvious inference would seem to be that Earth’s seasonally-changing orientation to the Sun is the key factor.

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