Fury at plans to scrap UK renewables subsidies

Posted: July 23, 2018 by oldbrew in climate, government, News
Tags: ,


They say all good things come to an end, and in this case the rug is being pulled away from support for various types of renewable project including small-scale solar systems, as PEI reports. Cue the usual wailing about the harmless trace gas carbon dioxide, as ever falsely described as ‘carbon emissions’. Coincidentally perhaps, the closure date coincides with the UK’s exit from the European Union.

Renewables and sustainability groups have reacted with fury to proposals by the UK government to scrap subsidies for green energy projects.

The feed-in tariffs scheme is the government’s subsidy scheme for small-scale low-carbon installations.

A consultation paper published yesterday sets out a proposal to close the export tariff alongside the generation tariff on 31 March 2019.

The move comes after government advisors in recent weeks called for a greater drive in wind and solar projects to combat climate change. The proposal to scrap subsidies was also published on the same day the government revealed its National Adaptation Programme 2018 to 2023, which sets out a strategy to deal with the effects of climate change.

Environment Minister Lord Gardiner said yesterday that climate change “is one of the most serious environmental challenges that we face as a nation”.

But Doug Parr, Greenpeace Chief Scientist, today said the subsidy-scrapping proposal leaves the UK’s “reputation for leadership on tackling climate change in tatters”.

“It’s absolutely shocking that, just weeks after the government’s main advisers on infrastructure and tackling climate change strongly recommended that the government back wind and solar because they are the cheapest and cleanest forms of power, the government is hanging these industries out to dry.

“The government is not planning on financially or politically supporting them at all. Jobs will go, skills will be lost, investment will dry up, and opportunities will be squandered.”

Gareth Redmond-King, head of climate and energy at WWF said the UK government “is seesawing between its ambition to deliver on the Paris Climate Agreement and this announcement ending subsidies for small scale renewables”.

“This move will prevent people – particularly low-income families – from accessing the benefits of onsite clean, free power. To begin restoring nature we urgently need to ramp up investment in renewables instead, in order to limit our carbon emissions.”

James Court, head of policy and external affairs at the UK Renewable Energy Association, said the removal of the export tariff for new projects “will lead to the truly bizarre situation where consumers who own technologies such as solar will give electricity they don’t consume to the grid for free”.

Continued here.

Comments
  1. A C Osborn says:

    But other incentives are being made available.
    See
    https://www.thegwpf.com/more-subsidies-for-cheap-renewables/

  2. ivan says:

    That is a start but they should remove ALL subsidies and level the playing field by requiring all generators to guarantee the amount of power they generate per week.

  3. TinyCO2 says:

    It’s a measure of how out of touch these people are or of how barefaced they lie that they think that low income families can afford the roof to put solar panels on, let alone the panels as well, with or without a subsidy.

  4. Bitter@twisted says:

    The predictable squeals of outrage as the pigs have their subsidy trough removed.
    Of course if solar was as viable as these crooks say it wouldn’t need subsidies.
    Ditto wind.

  5. oldbrew says:

    Energy ministers don’t understand, or pretend they don’t, that intermittent unpredictable power is a horrendous waste of money in any time-oriented industrial economy.

  6. A C Osborn says:

    The power might be intermittent but the subsidies and FIT are not.

  7. oldbrew says:

    It’s the same the whole world over…

    ARE RENEWABLE FEED-IN TARIFFS DEAD?
    Date: 21/07/18 Dr John Constable: GWPF Energy Editor

    Feed-in Tariffs for renewable electricity have been a disaster wherever they have been tried, resulting in over-deployment ahead of the learning curve, and vast long-term cumulative subsidy liabilities. Germany and Spain are already desperately moving to extricate themselves. The United Kingdom has in the last few days confirmed the closure of its own scheme to new entrants early in 2019.

    Coincidentally the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission (ACCC) has called for the immediate termination of the various Small Scale Renewable Energy Schemes (SRES) applied at state level, and most importantly the transfer of legacy costs to general taxation at state government level, making those authorities electorally responsible for their own policy costs.

    There is a clear global tendency here, to which the various renewables industries are responding with a disingenuous call for “subsidy free” tariffs, which are in truth covert subsidies. Once bitten, rather badly, one would hope that governments will be more than twice shy.

    http://www.thegwpf.com/are-renewable-feed-in-tariffs-dead/

  8. Graeme No.3 says:

    “that the government back wind and solar because they are the cheapest and cleanest forms of power”, “This move will prevent people – particularly low-income families – from accessing the benefits of onsite clean, free power”.

    “will lead to the truly bizarre situation where consumers who own technologies such as solar will give electricity they don’t consume to the grid for free”
    So removing subsidies will result in cheaper electricity and benefits for low-income families.

  9. oldbrew says:

    Those firms that offer to ‘borrow’ a householder’s roof to install solar PV will presumably be out of business, or out of new business, if/when there are no subsidies to be collected.

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