Causes of the Rapid Warming of the North Atlantic Ocean in the Mid-1990s

Posted: April 9, 2020 by oldbrew in Natural Variation, Ocean dynamics, research
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Pointing to any natural factors is frowned on by climate alarmists. But these factors have always been in play and always will be, and some researchers at least will find and discuss them.

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

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http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecover_30y.uk.php

Most of us are probably familiar with the pattern of Arctic sea ice decline between 1979 and 2007, followed by a period of relative stability. Most of the decline took place after the mid 1990s.

The decline is nearly always explained away as the result of global warming, but a couple of old studies show this not to be the case.

In 2011, Robson & Sutton found that the sub polar gyre underwent remarkable and rapid warming in the mid 1990s, and that this was linked to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation:

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https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00443.1

View original post 853 more words

Comments
  1. Paul Vaughan says:

    In all the years climate discussion raged on, no one left or right ever understood that NAO splits into 2 natural factors in long-run central limit.

  2. “… Arctic sea ice decline between 1979 and 2007, followed by a period of relative stability”. This pattern can be explained by the switch from satellites with significant orbital decay to ones with well controlled orbits: https://www.scribd.com/document/89395853/Could-Instrumentation-Drift-Account-for-Arctic-Sea-Ice-Decline

  3. Nelson says:

    Why not the cycles of the AMO. It sure explains Iceland temps.

  4. oldbrew says:

    Note the ‘North’ in the NAO…

    The North Atlantic Oscillation is closely related to the Arctic Oscillation (AO) (or Northern Annular Mode (NAM)), but should not be confused with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Atlantic_oscillation


    – – –
    Nelson says: Why not the cycles of the AMO.

    Look closely at the abstract, starting at ‘Furthermore’.

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