Brussels shoots down Dutch plan to subsidize hydrogen to replace fossil fuels

Posted: September 20, 2020 by oldbrew in Emissions, Energy, hydrogen
Tags: , , ,


Irrational fear of a minor trace gas in the atmosphere, largely based on the output of failing climate models, continues to disrupt national energy policies. EU leaders add to the chaos and confusion.

The European Commission turned down Dutch plans to support hydrogen production with subsidies, reports the NL Times.

The government of the Netherlands wants to use hydrogen instead of other fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but because the Dutch plans got shot down, this will not be continued, Climate Minister Eric Wiebes told the Tweede Kamer, the lower house of Parliament, on Monday, according to FD.

The government saw possibilities to replace oil, natural gas and coal by hydrogen, especially within heavy industry.

In the Netherlands, industry accounts for more than 30% of all greenhouse gas emissions.

In contrast to fossil fuels, no carbon dioxide is released when using hydrogen, provided that the hydrogen is produced in a sustainable manner.

Hydrogen is seen as an environmentally-friendly alternative to conventional fossil fuels. By oxidizing molecular hydrogen, the only direct by-product of their energy generation is water, which means they could significantly reduce pollution by man-made greenhouse gases.

To make hydrogen in a ‘green’ manner, a great deal of energy is needed from other sustainable sources. The Dutch government planned for this energy to eventually come from windmills [wind turbines] or solar parks.

But as electricity in the Netherlands is still mainly generated from natural gas and coal, producing hydrogen in the country would only increase carbon emissions for the time being, the European Commission said.

Source here.

Comments
  1. Stephen Richards says:

    It’s not good to be governed by someone who is part of your culture, traditions and country is it.

  2. Graeme No.3 says:

    Incredibly the EU got the decision right. I’m sure it won’t happen again for some time.

    Using intermittent electricity for electrolysis is about 36% efficiency, then there are the costs of storage, distribution etc. The end result would be energy a minimum 3 times as expensive as that from windmills. And, as we know, the Dutch stopped using these for serious purposes in the early nineteenth century.

  3. pochas94 says:

    Too bad. But I’m not in favor of worshiping COTOO by tithing taxpayers.

  4. Gamecock says:

    “In contrast to fossil fuels, no carbon dioxide is released when using hydrogen, but hydrogen production can produce carbon dioxide, just like fossil fuels.”

    Fixed it. Palindrome logic.

  5. pochas94 says:

    I’d like to see the Burlington Northern railway build a hydrogen locomotive and run it alongside the diesels on those miles long trans continental trains with three engines pulling and one or two pushing.

  6. oldbrew says:

    But as electricity in the Netherlands is still mainly generated from natural gas and coal, producing hydrogen in the country would only increase carbon emissions for the time being, the European Commission said.

    Inserting a hydrogen step in the process of going from gas or coal to electricity is an obvious waste of time and money. ‘Carbon emissions’ increases might or might not occur, but are beside the point.

  7. Gamecock says:

    Probably a waste of energy, too, oldbrew. Every transition takes energy.

    The proposal is expensive and worthless. Perfect!

  8. Phoenix44 says:

    What? The output of energy is always less than the input when converting one form to another? Never!

  9. A C Osborn says:

    I am sure that there is an unsaid competition as to who can come up with the most wasteful way to create energy.

  10. cognog2 says:

    Overall hydrogen use is is a very expensive and inefficient way of utilising an original energy source.

  11. oldbrew says:

    Where hydrogen comes in, if at all, is that it’s a lot lighter than batteries. Weight matters for transport, especially for large vehicles and trains which put a lot of pressure on the roads/rails/bridges.

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