Australia constructing giant 300-megawatt battery

Posted: November 8, 2020 by oldbrew in Batteries, Energy, News
Tags: , , ,

Power lines in Victoria, Australia [credit: Wikipedia]


Come the next potential blackout situation, the battery could give Victorians up to an hour to find a way out of trouble. But making the wind blow harder or the sun shine more won’t be among their options, of course.
– – –
Australia is poised to construct one of the world’s largest batteries, using Tesla’s technology for lithium-ion batteries, reports TechXplore.

The football-field sized battery will provide up to 300 megawatts of power output and 450 megawatts-hours of storage in a country that has been struggling to meet energy demands during skyrocketing power usage triggered by record-breaking temperatures.

Last year, Australia suffered its hottest and driest year ever, with temperatures topping 121 degrees Fahrenheit last December.

The battery, known as the Victorian Big Battery Megapack, will be located in the state of Victoria, Australia’s second most populous region.

The move to a modernized power generator and storage system is seen as critical by Australian officials to meet growing demands that are overwhelming older power grids that suffered numerous blackouts in recent years.

Victoria relies heavily on coal-powered plants. The state hopes to derive 50 percent of its power from renewable sources by the end of this decade.

“Victoria is taking a decisive step away from coal-fired power and embracing new technologies that will unlock more renewable energy than ever before,” said Victoria’s minister for energy, environment and climate change, Lily D’Ambrosio.

The French company Neoen SA and Tesla will undertake the project.

Neoen previously held the title as owner of the world’s largest battery with its Hornsdale 315 megawatt facility, which included 99 wind turbines. It was surpassed by the Gateway Energy Storage plant in San Diego last summer.

The new Victoria facility will be three times the size of Neoen’s Hornsdale plant.

The main objective of the new plant is to provide a more stable energy flow to meet growing power needs and halt blackouts.

“We know in the time of climate change, our summers are getting far hotter and much longer, so that means there is increased strain on our thermal generators,” D’Ambrosio said. “This is part of our plan to deliver security, reliability and affordable power.”

The battery is expected to have the capacity to power half a million homes for one hour.

Victoria officials say consumers should expect to see a return of $2 for every dollar invested in the project. The state will pay Neoem $84 million for the power grid.

The project is ideally situated in a region flush with wind farms and solar installations.

Full report here.

Comments
  1. Chaswarnertoo says:

    300 Megawatts? Pah! See Dinorwig.

  2. Jim Rose says:

    Reblogged this on Utopia, you are standing in it! and commented:
    The battery is expected to have the capacity to power half a million homes for one hour.

  3. spetzer86 says:

    Capacity is fine, but how fast does it actually discharge? Once it’s discharged, how to you power the mother back up in an energy-starved environment?

  4. oldbrew says:

    Australia aims to send solar-derived power to Singapore and ‘green’ hydrogen to Germany, as well as converting nearly all energy including vehicles to electricity at home. They’re going to need a humongous renewables splurge including dozens more of these megapacks, so how will they be paying for it all?

    https://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2020/11/01/germany-hopes-to-make-australia-one-of-its-hydrogen-suppliers/

  5. pochas94 says:

    The blackfellas have been there for thousands of years. At least they know how to survive.

  6. Gamecock says:

    Costs a lot, produces nothing.

    Is catastrophe delayed an hour no less a catastrophe?

    The objective is to get people to accept the coming catastrophe. And they will spend a lot of the people’s money to get them to accept it. So you get catastrophe, AND less money.

  7. JB says:

    The actually have 120% of deliverable power available during low-load periods to recharge these behemoths?

    And how do they propose to recycle these spent monster batteries that will consume mass quantities of the lithium mines?

  8. stpaulchuck says:

    I can’t wait for the explosion and massive fire that will pollute the air to poisonous levels. It will be fun watching the media cover-up and all the tap dancing by the pols.

    Oh yeah, and don’t miss the huge cost overruns on this.

  9. ivan says:

    JB, you are not supposed to ask sensible questions, after all the green things are just a matter of ideology and faith that the pixie dust and unicorn farts will work when needed.

  10. oldbrew says:

    JB – And how do they propose to recycle these spent monster batteries that will consume mass quantities of the lithium mines?

    If they can’t recycle, Australia’s a big place…

  11. Gamecock says:

    ‘I can’t wait for the explosion and massive fire that will pollute the air to poisonous levels.’

    That’s what I was thinking. Do you really want to concentrate that much lithium-ion fluid?

  12. Graeme No.3 says:

    The Premier (head of government) of Victoria is Dan Andrews, a far left Labor politician and a supporter of China. Sometimes known (in some circles) as Do Pi Dan.

  13. tallbloke says:

  14. oldbrew says:

    The battery is expected to have the capacity to power half a million homes for one hour.

    Victoria state population is 6.6 million.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_(Australia)
    – – –
    Must be over 3 million homes, maybe well over.

    So either a lot of folk would miss out altogether, or the power must run out far sooner than the 1 hour quoted — maybe 10 minutes. Or, they need more batteries if the 1 hour figure is going to mean anything.

  15. BLACK PEARL says:

    I imagine it would be a hell of a job to put out if it ever self ignites

  16. oldbrew says:

    Stand back…

    When the temperature reaches 500°C (932°F), the battery is at risk of exploding.
    https://steadfastfire.com/how-to-extinguish-a-lithium-ion-battery-fire

  17. pochas94 says:

    I wonder who will take charge of a 300 MW dead battery.

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