Why are hundreds of Pacific Islands growing despite rising sea levels?

Posted: January 7, 2021 by oldbrew in Ocean dynamics, research, sea levels
Tags: ,

In the Maldives


Just as the late Nils-Axel Mörner, a lifelong sea levels researcher, explained in an interview about two years ago. Let’s hope the climate miserablists now give up on their ‘drowning islands’ nonsense.
– – –
New research says hundreds of islands in the Pacific are growing in land size, even as climate change-related sea level rises threaten the region, says ABC News Australia.

Scientists at the University of Auckland found atolls in the Pacific nations of Marshall Islands and Kiribati, as well as the Maldives archipelago in the Indian Ocean, have grown up to 8 per cent in size over the past six decades despite sea level rise.

They say their research could help climate-vulnerable nations adapt to global warming in the future.

The scientists used satellite images of islands as well as on-the-ground analysis to track the changes.

Coastal geomorphologist Dr Paul Kench said coral reef sediment was responsible for building up the islands.

“All the islands that we’re looking at, and the atoll systems, comprise predominantly of the broken up corals, shells and skeletons of organisms on the coral reef, which waves then sweep up and deposit on the island,” he said.

Dr Kench said in areas where coral reefs were healthy, enough sediment was being produced to cause islands to grow.

Continued here.

Comments
  1. saighdear says:

    Huh, hum,…. Look at various webcams around the world: see excavators dredging to increase beach area / trap moving sands, etc.. Science?

  2. stpaulchuck says:

    “Let’s hope the climate miserablists now give up on their ‘drowning islands’ nonsense.”

    why get off a winning horse?? They’ve been rent-seeking off nonsense like this for a decade or more. There are still HUGE numbers of unintelligent and ignorant people out there who will dig in over and over to stop [fill in the blank with your favorite] from killing us all.

  3. JB says:

    Someday they might grow up to be continents…

  4. Chaswarnertoo says:

    As Darwin noticed, coral growth keeps up with sea level.

  5. oldmanK says:

    JB says “Someday they might grow up to be continents…”
    Tectonic changes never stopped. Possible area uplift, and submergence elsewhere. Follow seismic activity worldwide.
    Its peak Eddy cycle; times of big changes.

  6. oldbrew says:

    From the Nils-Axel Mörner interview (link above):

    N-AM: The sea certainly erodes the shores here and there, but islands grow elsewhere as well. It has always been like this.

    Q: Why do many climate researchers warn then about sinking islands?

    N-AM: Because they have a political agenda. They are biased towards the interpretation that man is causing climate change, and that it is a threat. The IPCC was founded with the purpose of proving man-made climate change and to warn against it. His goal was thus fixed from the beginning. It sticks to it like a dogma – no matter what the facts are. As a specialist in sea level developments, I have consistently found in recent years that the IPCC team does not include a single expert on this issue.

    Q: Is there no problem with the rise of the sea level at all?

    N-AM: No.
    – – –
    Case closed.

  7. Bloke down the pub says:

    Chaswarnertoo says:
    January 8, 2021 at 7:03 am
    As Darwin noticed, coral growth keeps up with sea level.

    Darwin noted that, not only does the growth keep up with sea level rise, but the growth is more stable than when sea level falls. Falling sea level exposes the coral to the sun and kills it. Storms then remove the sand and without new coral to replace it , the beaches and then the islands are washed away.

  8. Coeur de Lion says:

    Some time ago BBC’s Shukman flew twice out to Tuvalu at your expense AND FOUND THAT THEY BUILT THEIR HOUSES ON STILTS!!!
    Being ignorant of course, he’d never read Grimble. Perhaps he will suffer a ‘blow from above him’ and spare us all.

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