New data reveals British sea level records stretching back 200 years

Posted: March 2, 2021 by oldbrew in Natural Variation, research, sea levels
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Credit: University of Liverpool / National Oceanography Centre (Liverpool branch)


The graph looks consistent with mild warming following the Little Ice Age. About 30 cms. or 1 foot of sea level rise in 130 years since 1890 is nothing remarkable. The average duration of solar cycles was longer in the 19th century than in the 20th but that trend is reversing now, with a lot more sunspot-free days per cycle. Climatic effects may follow.
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A study published by University of Liverpool scientists, alongside colleagues from the Liverpool branch of the National Oceanography Centre, has uncovered and analyzed new sea level records from the nineteenth century which show that the increased rate of the rise of British sea level took place from 1890 onwards, says Phys.org.

Nowadays, sea level measurements around the British Isles are made by tide gauges which record digitally and transmit the data automatically.

The best of these records are fed into the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) which brings together the long, reliable tide gauge records from around the world.

However, in the nineteenth century the only long tide gauge records for Britain which stretched back beyond 1895 were from Aberdeen, Liverpool and Sheerness, and of these only Sheerness has records from before 1858.

None of these records is continuous, and it is not clear whether they represent the sea level of Britain as a whole, but they suggest that there was little in the way of British sea level rise prior to 1890.

Now in a paper published in the journal Progress in Oceanography, Liverpool researchers have for the first time produced a continuous sea level rise record for Britain dating back to 1820 by piecing together new sources of information from more than 100 new sites.

The new sources include old manuscripts, maps, admiralty dockyard data and tidal ledgers and provide a huge amount of detailed sea level data for different times and different locations around Britain.

Continued here.

Comments
  1. oldbrew says:

    the increased rate of the rise of British sea level took place from 1890 onwards

    Some of that could well be a result of the Krakatoa giant volcano of 1883…

    The eruption injected an unusually large amount of sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas high into the stratosphere, which was subsequently transported by high-level winds all over the planet. This led to a global increase in sulfuric acid (H2SO4) concentration in high-level cirrus clouds. The resulting increase in cloud reflectivity (or albedo) reflected more incoming light from the sun than usual, and cooled the entire planet until the sulfur fell to the ground as acid precipitation. [bold added]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1883_eruption_of_Krakatoa
    – – –
    So Krakatoa could have suppressed natural sea level rise for a few years at least.

    Edit: Mt. Sinabung is stirring again…

    MARCH 2, 2021
    Indonesia volcano belches huge ash column

    Sinabung, a 2,460-metre volcano, was dormant for centuries before roaring back to life in 2010 when an eruption killed two people.

    After another period of inactivity, it erupted again in 2013 and has remained highly active since.

    https://phys.org/news/2021-03-indonesia-volcano-belches-huge-ash.html

  2. Gamecock says:

    ‘Liverpool researchers have for the first time produced a continuous sea level rise record for Britain dating back to 1820 by piecing together new sources of information from more than 100 new sites.’

    ‘New’ sites?

    A hundred of them?

    Not buying this.

  3. oldbrew says:

    Gamecock – the report example shows data from Wick in Scotland.

    More info and views of some of the data, here…

    Rescuing tide gauge data from around the UK to study climate change and sea level rise
    https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/psmsl/uk-tides

  4. patrick healy says:

    I live on the North shore of the Tay estuary in North East Scotland. The local lobster fishermen assure me that they have more difficulty in launching their boats now than they recall doing so with their fathers 50 years ago due to the rising of the land/lowering of the sea levels.
    Could it have anything to do with the retreat of the great ice bergs here abouts?
    Is this why South Eastern England is sinking – and not due to poor French referring last Saturday in Cardiff?

  5. oldbrew says:

    Patrick – ‘Could it have anything to do with the retreat of the great ice bergs here abouts?’

    Of course, see no. 6 here:
    https://www.ntslf.org/about-tides/sea-level-faq

  6. stpaulchuck says:

    “Climate catastrophe since the beginning of the Industrial Age that has generated massive amounts of CO2 increasing every decade melting the polar ice at dangerously increasing rates!! [etc.]” In 5…4…3…

    totally ignoring that the LIA ended around 1880 to 1890 and warming seas belch up absorbed gases, particularly CO2, and warmer seas expand duh

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