Abrupt ice age climate changes behaved like cascading dominoes

Posted: April 9, 2021 by oldbrew in climate, Cycles, History, Ice ages, predictions, research, Temperature
Tags:
Rinksglacier

Rinks Glacier, West Greenland [image credit: NSIDC]

Interesting, but as we’ve had a temperature rise of about 1.2ºC since 1880, according to one source at least, comparisons with much bigger historical increases in shorter timescales seem somewhat ambitious, to say the least.
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Throughout the last ice age, the climate changed repeatedly and rapidly during so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger events, where Greenland temperatures rose between 5 and 16 degrees Celsius in decades, says Phys.org.

When certain parts of the climate system changed, other parts of the climate system followed like a series of dominos toppling in succession.

This is the conclusion from an analysis of ice-core data by a group of researchers that included postdoc Emilie Capron and associate professor Sune Olander Rasmussen from the Section for the Physics of Ice, Climate and Earth at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, in Denmark.

This discovery, just published in the journal Nature Communications, is concerning because the extent of sea ice in the Arctic played an important part in these dramatic climate shifts of the past.

Today, sea-ice extent is being rapidly reduced, and it is uncertain whether this part of the climate system can trigger sudden future climate change.

Understanding abrupt climate changes in the past is critical to our ability to confidently predict whether something similar will occur today or in the near future.

Over the last several decades, this has led climate scientists to search for causal relationships of abrupt climate change during the ice age when Greenland temperatures repeatedly rose by as much as 16 degrees Celsius in just decades before slowly falling back to normal ice-age levels.

Full article here

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Comments
  1. Gamecock says:

    ‘When certain parts of the climate system changed, other parts of the climate system followed like a series of dominos toppling in succession.’

    Implying causation.

    ‘Section for the Physics of Ice, Climate and Earth at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, in Denmark.’

    Sorry. I don’t believe anything from an institute with that long a name. They are trying to convince us that they should be believed.

    ‘Today, sea-ice extent is being rapidly reduced, and it is uncertain whether this part of the climate system can trigger sudden future climate change.’

    [citation needed]

    ‘Understanding abrupt climate changes in the past is critical to our ability to confidently predict whether something similar will occur today or in the near future.’

    You have been confidently predicting the future without it.

  2. oldbrew says:

    Today, sea-ice extent is being rapidly reduced

    ‘Today’ must have got stuck in about 2007. It’s hard to even find a graph that goes beyond 2015, but I came across this one after a while…

    [Credit: NASA]

    Hints of anti-correlation here between Arctic and Antarctic (sea ice maxima)…

  3. diogenese2 says:

    Gamecock: “you have been confidentially predicting the future without it.”

    What a punch line! I take my hat off..

  4. Phoenix44 says:

    I’m confused. Either something external changes to drive the changes or the climate is chaotic and can cause these rapid oscillations without an external change. Either way disproves CO2 being the only possible cause of current changes

  5. oldbrew says:

    Greenland temperatures repeatedly rose by as much as 16 degrees Celsius in just decades

    But modern warming of 1-1.3C in ~150 years can’t be natural? 🙄

  6. oldbrew says:

    The same physical processes changed together like a row of cascading dominoes, but surprisingly, neither the rate of change nor the order of the processes were the same from one event to the other.

    Which fits with the ‘forcing’ being external to the system.

  7. tom0mason says:

    Climate scientist move on from computer modeling to investigate the ‘toppling dominos’ effect in the real world.

    [Image from http://www.gifmania.co.uk]

  8. There is more evaporation of polar ocean currents in warmest times and it snows until sea level drops and it gets colder. There is less evaporation of sea ice covered polar ocean currents in colder times and it snows less until ice is depleted and it gets warmer.

    This is simple, easy to understand, basic ways that everything works.