China’s plans for Himalayan super dam stoke fears in India

Posted: April 12, 2021 by oldbrew in Energy, News
Tags:
ThreeGorges

Three Gorges Dam [image credit: caixinglobal.com]

Nothing if not ambitious. Needless to say it will need a lot of concrete, which will no doubt dismay climate botherers.
– – –
China is planning a mega dam in Tibet able to produce triple the electricity generated by the Three Gorges—the world’s largest power station—stoking fears among environmentalists and in neighbouring India, reports Phys.org.

The structure will span the Brahmaputra River before the waterway leaves the Himalayas and flows into India, straddling the world’s longest and deepest canyon at an altitude of more than 1,500 metres (4,900 feet).

The project in Tibet’s Medog County is expected to dwarf the record-breaking Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in central China, and is billed as able to produce 300 billion kilowatts of electricity each year.

It is mentioned in China’s strategic 14th Five-Year Plan, unveiled in March at an annual rubber-stamp congress of the country’s top lawmakers.

But the plan was short on details, a timeframe or budget.

The river, known as the Yarlung Tsangpo in Tibetan, is also home to two other projects far upstream, while six others are in the pipeline or under construction.

The “super-dam” however is in a league of its own.

Last October, the Tibet local government signed a “strategic cooperation agreement” with PowerChina, a public construction company specialising in hydroelectric projects.

A month later the head of PowerChina, Yan Zhiyong, partially unveiled the project to the Communist Youth League, the youth wing of China’s ruling party.

Enthusiastic about “the world’s richest region in terms of hydroelectric resources”, Yan explained that the dam would draw its power from the huge drop of the river at this particular section.

Full report here.

Comments
  1. nzrobin says:

    Just a note to check your units. Kilowatts is a power rating, not energy. For annual production we should be referring to kilowatt-hours or megawatt-hours, or for a thing this huge gigawatt-hours.

  2. JB says:

    Guess they plan to have some survivors from the COVID vax project to do the construction.

  3. Chaswarnertoo says:

    Water wars, here we come.

  4. oldbrew says:


    – – –
    Meanwhile in the UK, wind has gone missing but coal steps in…

    The Chinese super-dam on its own could produce more power than the entire UK demand.

  5. I have been predicting this. it is one reason the China wanted to take over Tibet-.more hydro power which some say is clean and green. The 3 Gorges dam which I have seen has 32 hydro turbines of a total capacity of 22,000 MW. but the actual peak is 18,000 MW. There is reduced flow in the winter and generation capacity can be down to 4000MW. I think annual electricity production is about 80,000 GWhrs. If they are talking about 300 billion Kwhr the electricity production will be 3 to 4 twice larger (close to UK’s production) It is possible the the annual water flow may be more even than the flow on the Yangtze. Another reason for building of the dam will be to thwart India. It is possible some of the water could be used for irrigation. China have also Nuclear energy and building more. It is possible they could get to 50% by hydro and nuclear.

  6. MrGrimNasty says:

    Wonderful, that’ll finish off a few more unique species and assist the extinction crisis tally that can be blamed on fossil fuels.

    (Just like the other Chinese hydro schemes have done.)

  7. Gamecock says:

    ‘able to produce 300 billion kilowatts of electricity each year’

    “Just a note to check your units. Kilowatts is a power rating, not energy. For annual production we should be referring to kilowatt-hours or megawatt-hours, or for a thing this huge gigawatt-hours.”

    I want to know in # of houses powered, the international standard.

    Wait, are Chinese houses comparable to GB houses? Can you power two Chinese houses for what it would take to power one GB house?

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