Net zero must be fair, say MPs – some hope

Posted: July 12, 2021 by oldbrew in government, ideology, net zero
Tags:

nz_trillionLet’s see if the public can find fairness in being forced to switch to electric cars and pay a small fortune to change their home heating systems, when the time comes – which it quite soon will. All in the name of so-called ‘decarbonisation’ which won’t achieve anything positive for the climate anyway, but suits the aims of the catastrophists.

Any fairness to be found here: ‘The extra demand for electricity will overwhelm most domestic fuses, thus requiring homeowners to install new ones, as well as circuit-breakers and new distribution boards. Most will also have to rewire between their main fuse and the distribution network. In urban areas, where most electrical cabling is underground, this will involve paying for a trench to be dug between the home and the feeder circuits in the street.’? [Source: The Hidden Cost of Net Zero: Rewiring the UK].
– – –
The government is criticised over its ‘insufficient’ public engagement practices around net zero, reports Energy Live News.

Fairness should underpin the UK’s transition to net zero.

That’s one of the recommendations of the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Committee which urges the government to prioritise the Net Zero Review and Net Zero Strategy to increase engagement with the public, businesses and industry.

In its report named ‘Climate Assembly UK: Where are we now’, the committee suggests the government’s public engagement practices are insufficient.

MPs recommend a ‘joined-up approach’ to net zero with local authorities, businesses and citizens.

The report also finds that the cross-departmental coordination in delivering net zero is inadequate.

Darren Jones, Chair of the BEIS Committee, said: “Whether it’s decarbonising heating in our homes, reducing our emissions from transport or dealing with changes in the workplace, we know the net zero transition will soon become a lived experience in every home across the country.

“But the government’s failure to engage the public means we risk people viewing the net zero transition in a negative light and perceiving policy measures as being imposed.”

Full report here.

Committee on Climate Change: The Sixth Carbon Budget – The UK’s path to Net Zero [pdf]

Comments
  1. Mike Wattam says:

    Ignoring the ability of UK MP’s to profit from their own legislation….

    Two prongs to this. Firstly, how to provide an all-embracing charging infrastructure in a bankrupt country? Secondly, how on earth will ordinary people be able to finance a decent electric car when they too are close to bankruptcy?

    Charging of electric vehicles is seen as a time bomb, for logical reasons. I have read that 40% of UK residents do not have home charging facilities because they have no ground level power access or parking places, and I do not challenge that. Local councils don’t have finances or the will to enable widespread power network installation on the great majority of streets, using closely pitched high power charging points. So what can the consumer do?

    If the UK government is stupid enough to stick with their 2030 objective, very many people are going to be up in arms. The ordinary man in the street (or will it be gutter?) will need to continue to use ICE cars and I think it’s an odds-on probability that ICE fuels will be super-taxed to reduce their use but increase money into the Exchequer. Street parking spaces are likely to be reserved for electric-only cars, physically driving more ICE cars out of existence and forcing the less wealthy consumer onto over-priced public transport.

    The net result is likely to be an even further divided society in which – despite emerging UK government legislation to constrain the underdog poor – the resulting action groups become more vocal and more physically active, readily stepping beyond civil disobedience. This division is already developing like a virulent cancer.

  2. Margaret H Smith says:

    As a pensioner, this is very frightening for me. But, of course, the cold will kill me anyway and as population reduction is the aim, it will work.
    The fact that it is based on a total falsehood makes it horribly criminal.

  3. Douglas Dragonfly says:

    Excellent post. Thank you. Now we just need the media to warn the public.
    Keep up the good work !

  4. Stephen Richards says:

    How do you measure “fairness”. What will be the KPIs?

  5. Stephen Richards says:

    Douglas Dragonfly says:
    July 12, 2021 at 12:59 pm

    Excellent post. Thank you. Now we just need the media to warn the public.
    Keep up the good work !

    Some hope !! The MSM has failed totally to investigate and inform for the past 10 years

  6. oldbrew says:

    The Hidden Cost of Net Zero also says:

    The cost to the country of rewiring alone will
    probably exceed £200 billion, or over £7,000 per
    household. This figure excludes the cost of new
    equipment, such as EV chargers, heat pumps
    and electric showers.

    – – –
    The National Grid is going downhill at the same time as all this, due to renewables and other disastrous so-called climate policies.

  7. Gamecock says:

    “But the government’s failure to engage the public means we risk people viewing the net zero transition in a negative light and perceiving policy measures as being imposed.”

    ‘Engage the public’ sounds like something from A Clockwork Orange.

    See, the problem isn’t the net zero transition is a negative and policy measures are being imposed, the problem is the people might recognize it’s a negative and is being imposed. The solution isn’t to stop doing stupid things, it’s to ‘engage’ people into accepting it.

    I don’t know what ‘engage’ means, but I don’t think I want to be ‘engaged’ by the government. If you have been ‘engaged,’ you won’t mind paying £7,000 to replace a good heating system with a marginal one.

  8. oldbrew says:

    ‘Engaged’ means believing that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere going up from 0.03% to 0.04% of the total amount is basically your fault and is a big deal, requiring drastic measures at your own expense.

    Ignore the fact that most so-called greenhouse gas is, and always will be, water vapour. Otherwise you might start to suspect you’re wasting your time and money.
    – – –
    The engagement stuff is mentioned here – somewhat sinister title…

    The importance of behavioural change in reaching net zero
    18th Dec, 2020

    Whilst the CCC’s central ‘Balanced Net Zero Pathway’ takes judgements on what is achievable to produce the core analysis for the 6CB, it has also developed four other scenarios for reaching net zero:

    1 – ‘Headwinds’ – low amounts of societal and behavioural change and innovation
    2 – ‘Widespread Engagement’ – higher levels of societal and behavioural change
    3 – ‘Widespread Innovation’ – greater success in reducing the costs of low-carbon technologies
    4 – ‘Tailwinds’ – higher levels of success on societal and behavioural change and innovation
    . . .
    What is clear though is that consumer engagement and societal and behavioural change is vital to the pace of change needed to reach net zero under all these scenarios. Policy design must therefore have a strong consideration for and be designed around the research done into behavioural economics to ensure that the chance of this change occurring is maximised.
    [bold added]

    https://gemserv.com/our-thoughts/the-importance-of-behavioural-change-in-reaching-net-zero/

  9. Gamecock says:

    From the link:

    ‘The BIT, recommend, based on their own experience, that if you want to encourage a behaviour you need to make it Easy, Attractive, Social and Timely (EAST)3.’

    They radiate the sincerity of a car salesman. Nothing is for you; it’s all about them.

    Government about the government, not about the people. At least they still care what you think, but that can’t last. When you refuse to think the way they want you to, they’ll change strategy.

    We are approaching the end of humanity.

  10. watersider says:

    “they” lost me long ago.
    Could some genius on here please explain to me what ‘net zero’ is and who thought it up.

  11. Steve Richards says:

    People only do well what they do naturally. It must be natural, painless and simple

  12. Phoenix44 says:

    “Lived experience”.

    Says it all really.

  13. Chaswarnertoo says:

    Have we reached peak insanity yet? Britain cannot affect world climate in any way.

  14. Phoenix44 says:

    If you make everyone 15% poorer then that’s going to hurt those who are already poor a great deal, those who are billionaires not so much.

    The trouble is, that 15% cannot be made good by even vastly increased taxation on the wealthy, so Net Zero is inevitably going to be hugely “unfair”.

    As for “engagement ” if they think that we will all support this madness once we understand it better, they really are fantasist.

  15. oldbrew says:

    Phoenix – they want us to *believe*, not understand. Believe in climate delusions, that is.

  16. oldbrew says:

    Rishi Sunak could set out green taxes for imports to help UK hit net-zero target

    A ‘civil war’ has broken out between ministers over the best way to ensure the public pays for the carbon emissions they produce
    July 12, 2021

    With the UK welcoming world leaders to COP26, the Chancellor will have little choice but to spell out plans for environmental taxes in an autumn Budget and Comprehensive Spending Review.
    . . .
    Ministers are increasingly at odds over the best way to ensure the public pays for the carbon emissions they produce, with the Treasury in a stand-off with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and No 10.

    One source said: “There is a civil war raging between departments as to how the Government can meet its commitments.”
    . . .
    Experts have warned, however, that the Government can only hope to raise taxes to generate much-needed funds, while nudging people towards more environmentally friendly choices if there are “viable alternatives”.
    . . .
    “Telling people to just eat less meat is not viable.”

    https://inews.co.uk/news/rishi-sunak-could-set-out-green-taxes-for-imports-to-help-uk-hit-net-zero-target-1099079
    – – –
    The commitments are bonkers anyway, as is the Punch and Judy show over how to meet them – which they can’t. How is it ‘environmentally friendly’ to obsess about carbon dioxide, a harmless trace gas essential to plants and vegetation?

  17. hdhuffman says:

    Chapter 138 in “When Science Goes Bad”…and politicians jump on it.

  18. hdhuffman says:

    I happened see a NASA interview yesterday, about Venus. It included call-in questions on social media. The NASA lady being interviewed provided only the slop “science” of the “greenhouse effect”, and everybody involved included the call-ins, simply took it for granted that she (with “consensus science”) knew what she was talking about. At one point, no doubt to emphasize the “importance” of the greenhouse lies, she said the Venus atmosphere was not much different from Earth’s, it was only much denser (!) No mention of Venus having an extra 50 km of atmosphere beneath the 1 atm level we have on the Earth’s surface.

    At some point, everyone (some one?) must say to themselves “Good God, what are the children being taught as “gospel”, or “settled science”!)

    Western civilization is on the ragged edge…and i-phones and social media will not correct it, any more than our insane politicians will correct their too-long-nurtured insanity.

  19. Douglas Dragonfly says:

    Ah Stephen Richards – I fear you are right.
    I did want to thank the author of this post for helping me understand this information war.
    Plus you never know who might be reading…

  20. ivan says:

    We must remember this is what we get when a Friends of the earth climate activist writes legislation (climate change act 2008) which sets up the CCC composed of insider traders out to feather their own nests and have the country run by the unelected Princess Nut Nut.

    When will they ever learn?

  21. oldbrew says:

    One of the strongest arguments for reducing greenhouse gas emissions is that it will often save money.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_neutrality#Reduction
    – – –
    Yes, save a little by spending a lot 🙄

  22. Coeur de Lion says:

    The whole exercise is quite pointless. CO2 hardly affects the weather. U.K. produces just over one per cent of the world’s carbon dioxide. Asia and Africa are building a thousand coal fired power stations.

  23. Gamecock says:

    0.04%

  24. oldbrew says:

    Green alternatives to gas boilers to cost £12bn more than Government planned

    New analysis shows that Downing Street has vastly underestimated the scale of home retrofits needed to reach its net zero targets
    16 July 2021

    Green alternatives to gas boilers will cost £11.8 billion more than the Government has budgeted for over the next four years because ministers have vastly underestimated the scale of home retrofits, The Telegraph can reveal.

    Homeowners and landlords also face paying £17.8 billion in the next four years to go green, according to analysis from leading energy groups and think tanks.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/environment/2021/07/16/green-alternatives-gas-boilers-cost-12bn-government-planned/
    – – –
    Finally the financial light is shone on ‘net zero’ lunacy, or one part of it at least. Not £12bn, but £12bn more.

  25. oldbrew says:

    Tory MP points out that net zero policies are crazy, mixed up and wildly unaffordable for most voters.

    https://www.conservativehome.com/platform/2021/07/craig-mackinlay-the-government-is-fooling-itself-if-it-thinks-it-can-go-down-the-net-zero-path-without-electoral-damage.html

    Craig Mackinlay is a Conservative Party politician and businessman. Since May 2015, he has been the Member of Parliament for South Thanet. Initially a member of the UK Independence Party, Mackinlay served as deputy leader of UKIP in 1997, before joining the Conservative Party in 2005. – Wikipedia

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