Early freeze: Arctic shippers eye release from Russian ice captivity

Posted: November 16, 2021 by oldbrew in Natural Variation, News, sea ice, weather
Tags: ,

Russian icebreaker Novorossisk [image credit: Okras @ Wikipedia]

Good news for ever-fearful climate obsessives leaving COP26, but not for stranded sea captains.
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The 15 ships that for the last two weeks have been ice-locked in Russian Arctic waters see release coming as a second icebreaker makes its way into the East Siberian Sea, says the Barents Observer.

Diesel-powered icebreaker Novorossisk early this week made its way into the Chukchi Sea with course for the ships that are battling to make it out of the sea-ice in the East Siberian Sea.

The vessels, among them an oil tanker and several fully loaded bulk carriers, have been captured in thick sea-ice in the far eastern Arctic waters since early November as an early freeze took captains and shipping companies by surprise.

Over the last weeks, only one icebreaker, the nuclear-powered Vaigach, has been available for escorts through the increasingly icy waters. That has been insufficient to aid the many vessels that have been on their way across the Northern Sea Route.

Over the past years, ice conditions in late October and early November have allowed extensive shipping along the vast Russian Arctic coast. This year, however, large parts of the remote Arctic waters were already in late October covered by sea-ice.

There is now an ice layer more than 30 cm thick cross most of the Laptev Sea and East Siberian Sea. And in the strait separating the mainland with the Island of Wrangel is an area with more than a meter thick multi-year old ice.

Full article here.

Comments
  1. […] Early freeze: Arctic shippers eye release from Russian ice captivity […]

  2. Chaswarnertoo says:

    Cold winter coming. Good job we didn’t spend billions on useless windmills…

  3. oldbrew says:

    Still 5 weeks to the shortest NH day…

  4. stpaulchuck says:

    faux news! the media told me the experts said there’s no Arctic sea ice so south of the Arctic Circle must be ice free. Right? /s

  5. Gamecock says:

    ‘Over the past years, ice conditions in late October and early November have allowed extensive shipping along the vast Russian Arctic coast.’

    Like I’ve been saying for years, Arctic sea ice is NOT good. Fake scientists cry about reduced Arctic sea ice, even though it is a good thing! Less is more.

    ‘This year, however, large parts of the remote Arctic waters were already in late October covered by sea-ice.’

    English as a second language.

  6. Phoenix44 says:

    I do wonder whether the warming period might be over? Humans seem to have a strange knack for peak fear of something just that bit after the thing has actually begun to decline.

  7. neilhamp says:

    PIOMAS October review seems to be admitting a recovery trend.
    http://psc.apl.uw.edu/research/projects/arctic-sea-ice-volume-anomaly/

    “The October time series (Fig 8) for both data sets have no apparent trend over the past 11 years”

    When will they notice that the AMO reached its peak about 11 years ago. If and when it starts to fall expect the Arctic ice to start to increase.

  8. tallbloke says:

    Neilhamp, the north Atlantic has been cooling since 2005, 2years after Solar started to decline. Arctic ice trend started flattening after 2007. I expect to see a strong increase in ice cover over he next 2 decades.

  9. neilhamp says:

    Thanks for the info. tallbloke.
    Hadn’t spotted the timing of cycle 24 decline.
    I am following the Arctic sea recovery very closely.
    AMO in decline, solar cycles significantly quieter and PDO entering a cool period.

    If these three “internal variables” start to have a meaningful effect on the climate we may at long last see an increase in Arctic sea ice extent. Patience is needed over the next few years.

    Are there any other parameters I should be watching?

  10. tallbloke says:

    Neilhamp, just keep watching your wallet as the rentseekers see that time is running out on their scam.

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