Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming

Posted: March 1, 2022 by oldbrew in atmosphere, Clouds, Emissions, Natural Variation, pollution, research, sea ice, Temperature
Tags: , ,

Arctic sea ice [image credit: Geoscience Daily]


Funny how climate science is so insistent on its dogma without knowing enough about aerosol effects, or cloud cover effects for that matter. Talk of ‘better understanding climate change’ is fine, but all we hear in the media is that the debate is over and it’s all cut and dried as far as alarmists are concerned?
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Scientists at EPFL and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have studied the chemical composition and origin—whether natural or anthropogenic—of aerosols in a region spanning from Russia to Canada, says Phys.org.

Their findings provide unique insights for helping researchers better understand climate change in the Arctic and design effective pollution-mitigation measures.

The work was made possible thanks to the joint effort of scientists from three continents.

The tiny particles suspended in the air known as aerosols play an important role in heating and cooling our planet, but their effects still aren’t fully understood. The particles can occur naturally, such as from volcanoes, forests and oceans, or be produced by human activity, such as fossil-fuel combustion and industrial manufacturing.

They interact with solar radiation, either reflecting it back out into space and lowering the Earth’s temperature, or absorbing it and raising the temperature.

They are also essential for the formation of clouds, which similarly play a role in cooling off or warming up the planet by reflecting solar radiation out into space or re-emitting terrestrial radiation back down to the Earth. Cloud formation in the Arctic is particularly sensitive to aerosols.

To gain deeper insight into these mechanisms, scientists at ENAC’s Extreme Environments Research Laboratory, headed by tenure-track assistant professor Dr. Julia Schmale, and the PSI’s Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, whose Research Laboratory Head is Dr. Imad El Haddad, analyzed samples taken from eight research stations across the Arctic over several years.

The Arctic is a crucial region for understanding climate change because the temperature there is rising two to three times faster than the rest of the planet.

“If we know what kind of aerosols exist in different areas and at different times of year, and what the origin and composition of those aerosols are, we will have a better grasp of how they contribute to climate change,” says Schmale. “That will also help us design more targeted measures to reduce pollution.”

The study was led by Vaios Moschos as part of his Ph.D. thesis, supervised jointly by Schmale and El Haddad.

Anthropogenic in the winter and natural in the summer

In a first study, Moschos et al. looked specifically at organic aerosols. Scientists still have little data on these aerosols even though they make up nearly 50% of total particulate matter.

The researchers in this study analyzed the chemical composition of samples taken in the Arctic and found that, in the winter, most of those aerosols come from human activity. They attribute this to the Arctic haze that occurs each year when emissions from oil extraction and mining operations in North America, Eastern Europe and Russia are carried to the Arctic and trapped there during the winter.

On the other hand, the study found that most organic aerosols in the summer come from natural sources. That’s because the transport of anthropogenic aerosols from mid-latitudes to the Arctic is diminished during the warmer months, and the high latitude emission rate of biogenic aerosols or their precursors rises.

“We didn’t expect to see so much naturally occurring organic aerosols,” says Schmale. “These particles come from boreal forests as well as phytoplankton, a micro-organism that lives in oceans. Here we might see a consequence of global warming in the future—as forests expand northwards and the permafrost thaws more organic molecules can be released from land, and as sea ice retreats, more open ocean leaves space for microbial emissions.”

Full article here.

Comments
  1. JB says:

    To me, such studies are no different than trying to determine the ecological effects of dung beetles wherever elephants migrate. What effect does the elephant dung have with/without the beetles?

    Really important microcosmic effects the world needs to know about….

  2. stpaulchuck says:

    “and design effective pollution-mitigation measures.” <— self identified rent seekers starting with the assumption that anything human is pollution, meaning "bad", then looking for proof.

    "The Arctic is a crucial region for understanding climate change because the temperature there is rising two to three times faster than the rest of the planet." Anyone got a reference or citation for this "fact"? And, how long has that been going on? Is it cyclical? I thought I read a recent article saying the Arctic is cooling rapidly recently. Any studies on undersea volcanoes like the huge field of them just discovered under Antarctic ice sheet?

    I'm glad they are doing this study but it sounds like another junk science project designed to confirm a pre-conclusion based on their feelings.

  3. oldbrew says:

    Arctic haze
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_haze

    Makes a few claims and does a bit of warmist arm waving.
    – – –
    “The Arctic is a crucial region for understanding climate change because the temperature there is rising two to three times faster than the rest of the planet.”

    Various reports have appeared saying that somewhere or other is warming twice as fast as the ‘average’, whatever that is. Easy to claim but credible scientific evidence is rarely, if ever, offered.

    ‘Retired women want more efforts to curb planet-heating emissions in Switzerland, where the climate is warming twice as fast as the global average’
    https://news.trust.org/item/20201027084932-c1upl

    If Switzerland is too hot they could try Scotland. The Hebrides perhaps – don’t forget the midge repellent.

  4. […] Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming […]

  5. Gamecock says:

    6,000,000 acres of Canadian boreal forest burn every year. Millions of acres of boreal forest burn every year in Alaska. Millions of acres of boreal forest burn in Siberia every year.

    There’s your aerosols in the Arctic.

    ‘The particles can occur naturally, such as from volcanoes, forests and oceans, or be produced by human activity, such as fossil-fuel combustion and industrial manufacturing.’

    Nah. Not really.

    Particulate from boreal fires has been known for generations. Seems to have escaped these fine people.

  6. This was written in the title of this blog: Scientists map Arctic aerosols to better understand regional warming

    They never do anything to understand anything better, they do everything to promote the ALARMISM

  7. oldbrew says:

    The modern warm period is past its peak. Hence the diversions into ‘extreme weather’ and ‘regional warming’ and all the other baloney.

    Talking about better understanding after years of claiming the climate was/is going pear-shaped due to humans is a bit rich.

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