Archive for the ‘Shale gas’ Category

The BBC is trumpeting a joint statement by David Cameron, Ed Milliband and Nick Clegg which spells economic doom for the UK. If ever there was a good reason to vote on May 7th for the only party committed to scrapping wind farm subsidy and nonsense ‘climate targets’, this is it.

blob-leaders

The three stooges write Britains economic suicide note.

The battle lines are drawn for me now. Energy policy is an important element in my campaign platform. Let’s take apart the statement’s key bullet points and assertions below the break.

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Via GWPF H/T Benny Peiser.

Europe Moves Closer To Shale Gas Development 
Take That, Vladimir: German Government Approves Fracking
Yesterday, two major events took place, bringing Europe a step closer towards developing a domestic shale gas industry. In the UK the Infrastructure Bill has been given Royal Assent and in Germany the Federal Government held a public hearing on the planned hydraulic fracturing draft law. Shale Gas Europe, 13 February 2015

U.S. natural gas production is poised to reach a record for a fifth year as shale drillers boost efficiency, driving prices toward a low of more than a decade. Output will rise 3.2 percent in 2015, led by gains at the Marcellus formation, the nation’s biggest shale deposit, according to the Energy Information Administration. Marcellus production will increase 2.8 percent through February after a 21 percent gain in 2014, a year when prices tumbled 32 percent. Producers in Pennsylvania and West Virginia have cut break-even costs by half since 2008, according to Oppenheimer & Co. –Naureen Malik,Bloomberg, 7 February 2015

1) Europe Moves Closer To Shale Gas Development – Shale Gas Europe, 13 February 2015

2) Take That, Vladimir: German Government Approves Fracking – EurActiv, 13 February 2015

3) Unstoppable Shale Revolution Poised For New Record Gas Production – Bloomberg, 7 February 2015

4) Matt Ridley: Giving Up On Shale Would Be A Big Mistake – The Times, 9 February 2015

5) Hail Shale: New American Shale Record – The American Interest, 11 February 2015

The German government has issued a draft law allowing fracking in shale and coal bed rock starting at a depth of 3,000 metres, permitting test fracking above 3,000 metres. After a long debate over the use of fracking technology in Germany, the federal government issued a draft law allowing the controversial gas extraction method under certain conditions and in isolated cases. –EurActiv, 13 February 2015

Environmental impact assessments do not have to be mandatory for shale gas exploration, the EU court has ruled.—ENDS Europe, 13 February 2015

Gas really is rather special: it provides us in this country with 84 per cent of our domestic heat, 27 per cent of our electricity, much of the feedstock for our synthetic consumer products, and pretty well all of the nitrogen fertiliser that has fed the world and largely banished famine. All this from a surprisingly small number of surprisingly small holes in the ground and the seabed, drilled with fewer accidents and spills than most other energy sources. That is one reason why I will be arguing and voting to help the government improve its Infrastructure Bill today when it comes before the House of Lords, so as to make a shale gas industry in this country possible. –Matt Ridley, The Times, 9 February 2015

Shale gas extraction is a process that has proved very safe and clean in the United States. It has had virtually no impact on groundwater, earthquakes or surface pollution anywhere. These are exaggerated myths constantly repeated by the wealthy multinational pressure groups such as Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth, by wealthy fashion designers and their nimby friends in gin-and-jag country, and by Vladimir Putin and other Russians with an interest in expensive gas. –Matt Ridley, The Times, 9 February 2015

American power plants burned more natural gas last month than ever before. Power generators used an average 23.1 billion cubic feet per day of gas in January 2015, up 13 percent from the 20.5 bcfd average in January 2014, according to Thomson Reuters Analytics. That was the most gas consumed by the power sector during the month of January on record, according to federal data going back to 1973. –The American Interest, 11 February 2015

1) Europe Moves Closer To Shale Gas Development
Shale Gas Europe, 13 February 2015

Yesterday, two major events took place, bringing Europe a step closer towards developing a domestic shale gas industry. In the UK the Infrastructure Bill has been given Royal Assent and in Germany the Federal Government held a public hearing on the planned hydraulic fracturing draft law.

The UK Infrastructure Bill is designed to simplify procedures for the onshore oil, gas and deep geothermal industries to access reserves 300 metres or more underground.  According to the Government further legislation will follow in July to provide more clarity on some of the specific amendments introduced  covering hydraulic fracturing, specifically exploration in National Parks and water protection zones.

In Germany, the Federal Environment and Economy Ministries hosted a public hearing in Berlin yesterday into its proposed draft law which seeks to regulate the exploration of unconventional resources in the country. A broad range of consultees gave evidence supporting the need to ensure that any exploration is conducted within an environmentally sustainable framework.  Equally clear was the need for a pragmatic approach to the Government’s energy policy to help provide security of supply and drive competitiveness. The Government is expected to finalise the draft outline in the coming weeks before submitting it to the Bundestag to be debated by Members.

Both the UK and Germany face critical energy challenges, becoming increasingly dependent on foreign imports. If this is going to be addressed effectively then both governments need to find alternative sources of domestic production. Renewables can only provide part of the solution.

In the UK production from the North Sea continues to decline. Total energy production was 6.6% lower in 2013 than in the previous year, resulting in an increase in imports of 2.3% and rising UK’s import dependency to 47%.

Germany is also seeing a significant rise in imports. In 2013 it imported 63% of its energy from abroad, an increase of 2% in 2012.  Its energy dependency is at its highest in 20 years and is currently 10% higher than the EU average. Germans however seem aware of the need for a pragmatic approach. According to a public survey conducted last October by Forsa, the leading market research and opinion polling institution, 70% of German citizens support the idea of exploring and assessing unconventional resources. 79% are also aware of the fact that natural gas and oil will be required to ensure a safe and affordable energy supply for the foreseeable future.

Full story

2) Take That, Vladimir: German Government Approves Fracking
EurActiv, 13 February 2015

The German government has issued a draft law allowing fracking in shale and coal bed rock starting at a depth of 3,000 metres, permitting test fracking above 3,000 metres.

The German government has tabled a draft law permitting fracking in the country, with environmental associations criticising the draft as fragmented and risky, calling on the government to concentrate on implementing the Energiewende, instead. EurActiv Germany reports.

After a long debate over the use of fracking technology in Germany, the federal government issued a draft law allowing the controversial gas extraction method under certain conditions and in isolated cases.

German Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks made every effort to dispel concerns over the controversial gas extraction technology. “In this way, we are applying the strictest rules that have ever existed in the fracking industry,” the Social Democratic Party (SPD) politician assured.

It will only be permitted under the strictest conditions and with the highest regard for the environment and drinking water, she said. The earliest possible date for initiation would be in 2019, because sample drillings must first be conducted to gather the necessary knowledge on the technology, Hendricks explained.

Full story

3) Unstoppable Shale Revolution Poised For New Record Gas Production
Bloomberg, 7 February 2015

Naureen Malik

U.S. natural gas production is poised to reach a record for a fifth year as shale drillers boost efficiency, driving prices toward a low of more than a decade.
Output will rise 3.2 percent in 2015, led by gains at the Marcellus formation, the nation’s biggest shale deposit, according to the Energy Information Administration.

Marcellus production will increase 2.8 percent through February after a 21 percent gain in 2014, a year when prices tumbled 32 percent. Producers in Pennsylvania and West Virginia have cut break-even costs by half since 2008, according to Oppenheimer & Co.

Drilling more wells at one site and extending the length of horizontal wells are among the efficiencies that have helped gas companies cope with falling prices. The EIA expects Marcellus to climb to about 20 percent of production in the lower 48 states from about 2 percent in 2007. Cabot Oil & Gas Corp., the biggest Marcellus producer, plans to increase output by at least 20 percent this year.

“The Marcellus has been a game changer in terms of production, reserve potential, everything,” said Fadel Gheit, a senior energy analyst for Oppenheimer & Co. in New York. “They are not waiting for higher gas prices to bail them out.”

Gas Prices

Natural gas futures fell 2.1 cents to $2.579 per million British thermal units Friday on the New York Mercantile Exchange, the lowest settlement since June 2012. Gas has declined 81 percent from a high in 2008 as production from shale formations increased, touching $1.907 in April 2012, the lowest since 2002.

Break-even prices for Marcellus producers have dropped below $2 per thousand cubic feet ($1.95 per million Btu) from around $4 in 2008, Gheit said in a Feb. 3 interview.

U.S. gas production growth was projected to slow to 1.4 percent last year, the least since a decline in 2005, the EIA said in December 2013. Instead, output jumped 5.6 percent. Efficiency gains at Marcellus producer Range Resources Inc. include plans to increase the length of underground horizontal wells by 36 percent to 6,200 feet (1,890 meters), with a third of the total topping 7,000 feet, according to a Jan. 15 company presentation. Range used drilling efficiencies to cut costs to $2.64 per thousand cubic feet in 2014 from $3.01 in 2012.

Shale Deposits
The company said it’s targeting 20 percent to 25 percent production growth “for many years.”

Southwestern Energy Corp.’s output may rise 28 percent this year as it drills longer wells, increases pipeline capacity and after spending $5.4 billion to acquire shale fields, according to a Dec. 30 company conference call.

Full story

4) Matt Ridley: Giving Up On Shale Would Be A Big Mistake
The Times, 9 February 2015

With oil prices so cheap and scaremongers in full cry, it might be tempting to forget shale. That would be a big mistake

I don’t know about you, but I have been especially glad of my gas-fired central heating and hot water in the past few frigid weeks. Gas really is rather special: it provides us in this country with 84 per cent of our domestic heat, 27 per cent of our electricity, much of the feedstock for our synthetic consumer products, and pretty well all of the nitrogen fertiliser that has fed the world and largely banished famine. All this from a surprisingly small number of surprisingly small holes in the ground and the seabed, drilled with fewer accidents and spills than most other energy sources.

That is one reason why I will be arguing and voting to help the government improve its Infrastructure Bill today when it comes before the House of Lords, so as to make a shale gas industry in this country possible. When the bill was debated in the Commons, shale’s increasingly irrational opponents failed to impose an effective moratorium in England, though they have managed it in Wales and Scotland. But they still altered the Infrastructure Bill enough to tie the industry in strangling knots of new and unnecessary red tape that must be reversed if we are to see domestic shale gas heating British homes, paying British wages, feeding British factories, generating British electricity and not delivering us into dependence on a dangerous Russia.

As a source of energy, gas is more reliable than wind, cleaner than coal, more flexible than solar, cheaper than nuclear, safer than biofuel, less land-hungry than hydro. We will be burning it for decades to come under any policy. The National Grid’s extreme “gone green” scenario for future energy policy, under which we would have cut our carbon dioxide emissions by 60 per cent by the year 2035 still sees us burning almost as much gas in that year as we burn today.

So we will still need gas, whatever happens. Domestic production, mainly from the North Sea, has fallen by 66 per cent in the past decade and we now import half our gas. Beneath Lancashire and Yorkshire, in the Bowland shale, lies one of the richest gas resources ever discovered, just 10 per cent of which would be enough to provide nearly 50 years of British needs.

The technology to get it out involves using water and sand to make cracks that are a millimetre wide in rocks that are a mile and a half down. A month’s work leads to 25 years of gas flow from a quiet box of tricks that can be hidden behind a hedge. No need to festoon the hills with permanent concrete bases for 400ft towers of steel trying to suck a sparse trickle of energy out of the wind on a cold, calm day.

Shale gas extraction is a process that has proved very safe and clean in the United States. It has had virtually no impact on groundwater, earthquakes or surface pollution anywhere. These are exaggerated myths constantly repeated by the wealthy multinational pressure groups such as Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth, by wealthy fashion designers and their nimby friends in gin-and-jag country, and by Vladimir Putin and other Russians with an interest in expensive gas. In places such as Pennsylvania the effect of shale gas has been job creation, wealth creation and environmental benefits. Blackpool could do with more well-paying jobs.

Some are now arguing that falling oil prices have rendered the argument over British shale gas academic. Prices have fallen so low as to make the cost of drilling wells and fracturing rocks uneconomic. Certainly if oil stays at $50 a barrel, the rig count in the shale-oil fields of Texas and North Dakota will continue to drop fast, and oil production (currently still rising) will tail off. But shale gas production has been rising fast in recent years despite persistently low gas prices in America, partly because of rapid improvement in the productivity and cost of gas wells as the practice of horizontal drilling and fracking is perfected. […]

We have a huge chemical industry in this country, employing hundreds of thousands of people directly and indirectly, and it needs methane and ethane, derived from natural gas wells, as feedstock. That industry will disappear rapidly if we do not exploit domestic shale. It has repeatedly warned us of this.

Full post

5) Hail Shale: New American Shale Record
The American Interest, 11 February 2015

American power plants burned more natural gas last month than ever before. Reuters reports:

Power generators used an average 23.1 billion cubic feet per day of gas in January 2015, up 13 percent from the 20.5 bcfd average in January 2014, according to Thomson Reuters Analytics.

That was the most gas consumed by the power sector during the month of January on record, according to federal data going back to 1973.

The shale boom has unleashed a torrent of new sources of natural gas, and that abundant supply has depressed prices to the point that its squeezing out other potential power sources. American coal consumption is being hit by this, which is notable for two reasons: first, coal is often thought of as the cheapest fossil fuel around, which makes the fact that natural gas is displacing it all the more impressive. Second, coal is a dirty energy source, in terms of both local air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Burning natural gas as opposed to coal can cut those emissions in half.

So this winter, know that not only has the shale boom keep heating bills down across America, but that it’s been a boon for the environment as well.

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 Last week the woeful Environmental Audit Committee succeeded in pushing through a number of restrictive amendments to the parliamentary biill on fracking, putting variously designated areas such as national parks, groundwater source areas and SSSIs off limits. For now, this isn’t a disaster, since the benefits to local communities and the country as a whole will become obvious in fracking permitted areas. But the irrationality of the opposition is still a threat to the UK economy and our energy security. frackingmapfinal3A comment on the Guardian’s website makes some good points:

Take away 40% from the 60% of the UK offered for fracking and you get 36% of the UK land mass still open for fracking.

As throughout this hysteria the anti frackers propaganda relies on ignorance hence it is wildly popular with the febrile masses.

Once a few wells have been fracked and people see the reality that is that the local impact is not dissimilar to having a cement depot near you but only for a few months the hysterics will go quiet for a short while before they pop up again with their next pile of primitive fearful sh1te to inflict costs of on society as they indulge in the subconscious frisson of fear.

In the real world over 1 million wells have now been fracked with only a handful of early wells having problems as the technique and regulation required was first developed. In recent years fracking failures are rare as rocking horse poo, which your garden is no doubt full of.

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Oldbrew: The Scottish renewable energy show rumbles on

Posted: January 29, 2015 by tallbloke in Energy, Shale gas, wind
Tags:

The Scottish renewable energy show rumbles on…
josh-hammer-of-the-scots

Scotland’s top judge calls for new ‘energy court’ to handle renewables and shale gas disputes’ (Jan. 29, 2015)

But that idea may already be running out of…er, gas:
The Scottish government has announced a block on planned fracking operations, pending further inquiries. (Jan. 28, 2015)

Meanwhile the RSPB has put the wind up offshore renewable energy developers with legal action.
Now some major projects will be held up for months at least.

‘RSPB Scotland sent shockwaves through the sector in Scotland earlier this month after a last-minute move to seek judicial review of Mr Ewing’s decision to grant consents for the Neart na Gaoithe, Inch Cape and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo arrays.’

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bbc-greenpeace-medThe BBC doesn’t like fracking. This is evident from their coverage over the years (example). In order to ramp up concern, they use every trick in the book. This one is a diagram they use which is designed to worry people about shalegas getting into the water table, and the ongoing presence of a big ugly tower (wind turbines anyone?) making a blot on the lanscape. Of course, they include a ‘not to scale’ grey on a grey background label for plausible deniability purposes.

UPDATE: Josh has kindly send a ‘to scale’ drawing for us to refer too. BBC take note. See bottom of post.

shale_gas_extraction

Below the break, I’ve made an improved version which the BBC is welcome to make use of if they are interested in escaping further criticism of their blatant bias. I left them some tidying work to do, since I don’t get paid for correcting their deceptive output.

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The level of ignorance is astonishing. These people aren’t fit to wield power. Vote them out in May.

eac-release
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Reposted from Energy in Depth

by Dave Quast  

The Sierra Club, founded in San Francisco in 1892 by legendary conservationist John Muir, was once a clarion voice for the preservation of public lands and environmental stewardship. To note that the group has grown increasingly distant from its roots is an understatement. Its decline, which we have covered previously, unfortunately moves on apace with the release of its latest video: “Fracking 101.”

Following in the “ban fracking” activist tradition of believing that actors (and whatever Yoko Ono is) somehow confer scientific legitimacy to anti-scientific polemics, the video features a voice-over by Edward James Olmos, who we will assume was unaware that the scripted words he was paid to read are the opposite of the truth.

Introducing the animated video in the Huffington Post, current Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune wrote:

“…fracking and other dirty fuel development is bad for public health, bad for the climate, and bad for the economy.”

While this is likely all you need to know about the seriousness of today’s Sierra Club, let’s examine the claims made in the video.
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Airport scene [image credit: Wikipedia]

Airport scene
[image credit: Wikipedia]


The New York Times reports on one advantage of owning a large block of land:

‘With a single well, drillers can bore down a few thousand feet, turn sideways and drill lateral wells up to two miles long. In other areas of Pennsylvania, that can mean having to secure permission from hundreds of property owners. The airport, though, is 9,000 acres with a single landlord.’

“It’s like finding money,” said Rich Fitzgerald, the county executive of Allegheny County, which owns the airport. “Suddenly you’ve got this valuable asset that nobody knew was there.”

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From New Scientist:

As sanctions deepen, just how crucial is Russian gas?
17:00 24 July 2014 by Jon Excell

Russian-bear-cartoonEurope gets around 30 per cent of its gas from Russia, but some countries are more dependent on it than others: the Czech Republic and Finland, for example, import at least 80 per cent of their gas from the country, while Germany, which has been treading particularly carefully in its dealings with Putin, imports around 36 per cent of its natural gas and 39 per cent of its oil from Russian suppliers.

The situation in the UK is less clear. Gas imports account for around 70 per cent of supply, but because of the complex European network of pipelines and interconnectors that we rely on, it’s difficult to say exactly how much of that imported gas is Russian. Some reports claim that Russia supplies around 15 per cent of that total and others put this figure much lower. Russian energy giant Gazprom estimates that it sends 11 to 12 billion cubic metres to the UK each year, out of an overall UK consumption of around 84 billion cubic metres.

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H/T to Oldbrew for this story via GWPF from the Sunday Times. I hope this haste doesn’t mean we’ll lose a lot of the benefit of developing a home grown shale gas extraction industry, with the benefits of boosting UK engineering and providing much needed indigenous employment and training in worthwhile skills.

FAST-TRACK FRACK LICENCES ‘VITAL TO PROTECT BRITAIN’
Date: 27/07/14 Tim Shipman, The Sunday Times

Blackpools-Shale-Gas-Dril-007Fracking for shale gas is to be fast-tracked because it will give Britain greater energy security and protect it from Russian aggression, the new Tory energy minister has revealed.
In an interview with The Sunday Times, Matthew Hancock said the government would make it “much quicker” for companies to get approval to drill for shale gas.

At present firms that want to frack have to wait about six months for permission through a 15-stage process. Hancock hopes to slash that in half. Calling shale the “holy grail” of energy policy, he said:

I want to speed up shale. It takes too long at the moment. We have to ensure that instead of an array of complicated permissions we have very firm but very clear rules.

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image

From the Guardian

Pipes and pylons operator says failure to invest more in local gas production would leave country 90% dependent on imports

The price of electricity could double over the next two decades, according to forecasts published on Thursday by the National Grid, the company responsible for keeping Britain’s lights on.

The current price of wholesale electricity is below £50 per megawatt hour but could soar to over £100 by 2035 under a “high case” example used in the Grid’s UK Future Energy Scenarios report.

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Blackpools-Shale-Gas-Dril-007From Emily Gosden in the Telegraph:

Centrica has said it is unlikely to bid for more UK fracking rights when they are offered in coming weeks, underlining the uncertainty over whether shale gas extraction will prove to be viable.

The British Gas owner last year became the first major company to back the search for UK shale when it bought a 25pc stake in licences owned by Cuadrilla in the Bowland basin in Lancs, in a deal worth up to £160m.

Ministers are expected to launch the “14th onshore licensing round” by July, offering up drilling rights across 37,000 square miles of Britain.

But Mark Hanafin, Centrica’s head of upstream, said it would “probably not” bid for more access, suggesting it did not want to “bet” more money on shale before fracking had taken place to prove whether the gas could actually be extracted.

“My main focus is not on grabbing land, it’s on the Bowland shale,” he said. “Finding out if the UK has got this amazing resource or not – it might not.”

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For many years, environmental activists have pushed for bans, moratoria, or other restrictions on hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”), alleging the process is a threat to public health and the environment. But in recent months, increasing numbers of environmentalists have distanced themselves from the “ban fracking” agenda. Many have even embraced shale gas on environmental grounds, revealing how extreme and marginalized the campaign to restrict hydraulic fracturing has become.

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The question is prompted from reading this report on the BBC website:
‘World’s Fair: Isaac Asimov’s predictions 50 years on’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-27069716

Tesla’s concept of free wireless electricity never made it to market, but maybe one day…
Tesla_colorado

An obvious one might be the fusion reactor, as Asimov foresaw: “An experimental fusion-power plant or two will already exist.”

Chances must be good (?) if schoolboys can already build their own:
‘All my friends think I’m mad’

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/10679744/British-schoolboy-13-becomes-youngest-to-build-nuclear-fusion-reactor.html

More likely is the commercial development of methane hydrates as an abundant energy source, if or when shale gas has run its course or is politically a no-no:
‘Methane hydrate: Dirty fuel or energy saviour?’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-27021610

Or we could all be spurning fuel technology, piling on the thermal clothes and going around on bicycles, hoping the sun shines and the wind blows ;-)

Guest post from Andrew McKillop

Death Cross Mix for European Energy : No Future
by Andrew McKillop 29-03-2014

EU-sinkingPlay With the Toy Until it Breaks
Commentators have begun to focus on the “moving average” of always-unrealistic energy policy and programs in the European Union, easily finding that they signal a “bearish outlook” for future energy supply in Europe – but certainly not for energy prices.  In fact not only the poster child victim of the EU’s mix and mingle of often-extreme policies – electricity, but also increasingly gas and then oil – faces a supply outlook that almost inevitably has to be down. This is despite, or because of, ever-rising energy prices, led by electricity price rises! Prices are driven up by a death cross convergence of political, economic, financial, technical and even cultural “life style” factors. In the poster child country for European “energy transition”, German household electricity prices are around 25 euro cents per kiloWatthour in early 2014, pricing their power at an oil equivalent (1600 kWh per barrel) of around $540 per barrel equivalent. Can we be surprised that German electricity consumption is falling?

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Excerpts from Robert Bryce’s forthcoming report for the Institute on American Energy Advantages, via the Wall Street Journal: H/T R.J. Salvador
fracking
For years, greens and many on the political left have insisted that widespread adoption of renewable energy will create jobs and stimulate the economy. An example: In September 2008, then-candidate Barack Obama claimed at a speech in Golden, Colo., that his planned investments in “green” energy would create “five million new jobs that pay well and can’t ever be outsourced.”

It was all bunk.

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This is just a brief post regarding the UK’s need to regain its sovereignty, and UK Independence Party’s tactics to achieve that goal. This is vital if the UK is to regain control over its energy policy, and end the madness of the E.U. Tory/Libdem and Labour party obsession with ‘carbon emissions’.

Google search results:

UKIP + “EU exit”
About 16,000 results (0.29 seconds)

I’ve just used google trends to check when the combination of UKIP+EU exit” has been most newsworthy. Unsurprisingly it has been near elections. The highest result is this year, following UKIP’s electoral success in May, when it gained around 140 council seats.

ukip-eu-exit-trendhttps://tallbloke.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/ukip-eu-exit-trend.png

In terms of raising public awareness, and shifting public opinion, UKIP has been highly successful. A majority in the UK now think we should leave the E.U. Before May, a majority thought we should stay in.

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My thanks to Michele Casati for the Heads-up on this blistering three minute speech by UKIP leader Nigel Farage in the European Parliament. He lambasts EU supremo Jose Manuel Baroso for the stupidity of the Green Agenda pursued by the E.U.’s leadership over the last decade, and the fuel poverty and industrial flight it has caused. Baroso’s following two minute hate is well worth a watch too. In it he claims the scientific consensus on global warming is now up to 99%. It’ll be 104% next year and all targets for the five year plan will have been met…

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NowindFrom the Telegraph:

Owen Paterson, the Environment Secretary, has commissioned a consultancy to investigate whether renewable technologies – including wind turbines – lower house prices in the countryside.

Chris Heaton-Harris, the Conservative MP for Daventry, said:

“Wind farms definitely affect house prices and it is highly likely that this report will come to that conclusion…I would expect there to be billions of pounds of planning blight because of wind turbines close to properties…. It’s almost like elements of DECC are acting like a mafia … now you’ve got DECC trying to stick its dirty great footprints all over another department’s work. While this is unsurprising, it will all unravel in the end and I’m sure the evidence will come out soon that proves a number of these points correct.”

He said that one of his constituents had seen the value of their £700,000 property fall by £250,000 because of approved plans for a wind turbine.

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Police Clear Way for Fracking at Balcombe

Posted: August 23, 2013 by tallbloke in alarmism, Legal, Shale gas

From GWPF

balcombe-camping

There were fewer than 100 protesters left tonight at a potential fracking site as they finally admitted defeat to the police. More than 1,200 activists had brought exploratory shale gas drilling to a halt on the edge of the village of Balcombe, West Sussex, at the weekend. But after officers from more than 10 police forces pushed back campaigners from the site’s entrance allowing lorries to enter on Monday, they left in their droves. –Ryan Kisiel, Daily Mail, 22 August 2013
Protesters against fracking risk worsening the plight of the five million households struggling to pay their energy bills, Britain’s official fuel poverty adviser has warned. Ministers have a “duty” to promote the extraction of shale gas because it has the potential to drive down the cost of energy, according to the chairman of the Fuel Poverty Advisory Group. Derek Lickorish says that “the voice of the fuel poor has been lost in the current frenzy” at Balcombe, West Sussex, where the energy company Cuadrilla Resources has been targeted by anti-fracking protesters. –Tim Webb, The Times, 21 August 2013

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