Archive for the ‘Shale gas’ Category

The extreme end of the environmentalist movement decided on a novel approach to getting the public on their side this weekend; by blocking five bridges in central London, causing a huge traffic jam. Predictably, the result was a lot of unnecessary carbon dioxide and particulate emissions from stationary vehicles.

We can only recommend the organisers read this article by Stephen Moore
published in April 2016 on the Real Clear Politics website.

The U.S. Department of Energy published data last week with some amazing revelations — so amazing that most Americans will find them hard to believe. As a nation, the United States reduced its carbon emissions by 2 percent from last year. Over the past 14 years, our carbon emissions are down more than 10 percent. On a per-unit-of-GDP basis, U.S. carbon emissions are down by closer to 20 percent.

Even more stunning: We’ve reduced our carbon emissions more than virtually any other nation in the world, including most of Europe.

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Shale gas drilling site [image credit: BBC]


Finding our own gas instead of paying for costly imports should be a no-brainer, but some people seem to be too squeamish, or too ideologically obsessed, to accept such realities.

In the week that saw three tankers of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) arrive into the UK on the same day, Cuadrilla has announced that is has succeeded in flowing gas to the surface from the first of two horizontal wells to be hydraulically fractured (fracked) at its Preston New Road site in Little Plumpton, reports Lancashire for Shale.

“This is fantastic news, and a real credit to the expertise and tenacity of Cuadrilla and its partners, proving that it is possible to safely recover gas from the rich shale deposits beneath our feet,” said Lee Petts, Chair at Lancashire For Shale.

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Sabine Pass LNG Terminal, Louisiana [image credit: naturalgasnow.org]


The US President just became a successful natural gas salesman, after complaining that Germany was too dependent on Russian gas.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker made the announcement during his visit to the White House yesterday, reports Energy Live News.

The European Union plans to import more liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the US to diversify its energy supply.

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Shale gas drilling site [image credit: BBC]


After years of wrangling, the UK (or at least England) seems to have at last run out of ways to avoid tapping in to the wealth that is the gas under the nation’s feet, in this case anyway. Why import what can be produced at home?
H/T The GWPF

Shale gas developer Cuadrilla on Tuesday became the first operator in Britain to receive final consent from the government to frack an onshore horizontal exploration well, reports Reuters.

The government said it had granted approval for so-called hydraulic fracturing to take place at Cuadrilla’s Preston New Road site in northwest England.

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Permian shale, Texas [image credit: fulcrium.com]


Not a bad idea from someone who admitted “I was just trying to keep my job”.
H/T The GWPF

Two decades ago, an engineer tried a new way to get gas out of the ground. Energy markets and global politics would never be the same, writes Russell Gold @ The Wall Street Journal.

DISH, Texas – Twenty years ago this month, a well was drilled here that changed the world.

Nothing at the time suggested the unassuming well in this rural town north of Fort Worth would hobble OPEC, the powerful oil cartel that had governed prices of the world’s most important commodity for more than a generation. Or that it would help turn the U.S. into a global energy exporter, or shuffle the geopolitical deck.

But it did all of that – and more.

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CFACT-Putin-Billboard-628x353June 21, 2018 by CFACT

CFACT’s kicked off a new billboard on busy I-10 in Louisiana which reads, “Russia funneled Green groups millions of dollars to oppose fracking & cripple American energy,” and asks, “How’s that for COLLUSION?”

The billboard campaign was spearheaded by CFACT’s Graham Beduze and Adam Houser.

Russia wants to reduce and eliminate competition to its energy exports with the goal of keeping prices high and the world, particularly Europe, dependent on Russian energy.

What better allies could Putin find but the free world’s network of Green pressure groups?

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Appalachia [click to enlarge]


Actual evidence contradicts colourful but unresearched scare stories once again.

A study of drinking water in Appalachian Ohio found no evidence of natural gas contamination from recent oil and gas drilling, reports Phys.org.

Geologists with the University of Cincinnati examined drinking water in Carroll, Stark and Harrison counties, a rural region in northeast Ohio where many residents rely on water from private underground wells.

The time-series study was the first of its kind in Ohio to examine methane in groundwater in relation to natural gas drilling.

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Credit: Wikipedia


This only confirms in greater detail what has been fairly well-known for quite a long time anyway.
H/T The GWPF

For months, House Committees and a Special Counsel have been investigating Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election, reports Inside Sources.

Even as these investigations continue to make headlines, interference in American energy markets, which was likely even more successful, has received relatively little attention.

According to new findings from the House Committee on Space, Science, and Technology, Russian agents worked to manipulate specific groups inside the U.S. in order to “disrupt domestic energy markets, suppress research and development of fossil fuels, and stymie efforts to expand the use of natural gas.”

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Permian shale, Texas [image credit: fulcrium.com]


The rise and rise of US shale continues to defy the arguments of its critics, shaking up the world with new ideas and greater efficiency.
H/T Bloomberg

‘Cube development,’ which taps multiple layers of shale all at once, could accelerate the U.S. shale boom and make the world swim in cheap and abundant energy for much of the next 250 years, as The GWPF reports.

In the scrublands of West Texas there’s an oil-drilling operation like few that have come before.

Encana Corp.’s RAB Davidson well pad is so mammoth, the explorer speaks of it in military terms, describing its efforts here as an occupation.

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Credit: dragonproductsltd.com


H/T GWPF / RealClearEnergy

The author notes that ‘the rigs are getting roughly twice as productive every three years. No other energy technology is improving that quickly.’

Wind and solar are now experiencing a declining rate of improvement as those technologies start to approach their limits in terms of what physics permits. Shale technology is a long way from its physics limits. In fact, the shale industry is at the beginning of what I’ve earlier termed Shale 2.0.

The Promethean task of supplying energy to the U.S. economy and the rest of the world involves scales that are truly difficult to visualize. Many options appear to make sense until you crunch the numbers. That’s why Bill Gates said that people need to bring “math skills to the problem.”

Consider petroleum alone, which accounts for about one-third of global energy use.
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[credit: cityam.com]


H/T GWPF

It’s been a bumpy road so far for UK shale gas and there could be more of the same ahead, but for now it’s progress. The US has shown that big economic benefits to the nation are there for the taking if the drilling is as successful as predicted.

British unconventional exploration company Cuadrilla plans to start the drilling stage of its shale gas exploratory plans in northwest England within the next “couple of months,” company CEO Francis Egan said this week.

Egan welcomed the UK’s High Court decision dismissing two claims made against Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Sajid Javid’s approval of planning for Cuadrillla’s Preston New Road site.

Last year, the company had its planning application denied by the local Lancashire councillors, but that was overruled by Javid, following a recommendation to approve from the council’s planning officers.
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churcheng
Sometimes, that is. Any financial returns would also be acceptable no doubt.
H/T GWPF

The Church of England has concluded that fracking can be morally acceptable in a move that shale gas explorers hope could pave the way for drilling to take place on church land.

After years of internal debate on the issue, the church has published an extensive briefing paper giving cautious support for fracking subject to conditions, including strict regulation, environmental monitoring and compensation for those affected.

It concluded that fracking could be useful to tackle climate change as long as shale gas replaced dirtier energy sources. The position puts it at odds with groups such as Christian Aid, which opposes all fracking on climate grounds.
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Hydraulic fracturing wellhead  [image credit: Joshua Doubek / Wikipedia]

Hydraulic fracturing wellhead
[image credit: Joshua Doubek / Wikipedia]


Fracking permission takes a week in Texas but nine years in Britain, as the GWPF’s Dr Benny Peiser points out. Some objectors still claim the technique is unproven despite years of experience in the USA and elsewhere.

Communities secretary Sajid Javid has upheld an appeal made by Cuadrilla in February against the decision by Lancashire County Council to refuse permission to carry out hydraulic fracturing at two sites in the region reports Utility Week.

In a letter to a lawyer representing the drilling company, Javid said it will be allowed to drill and then fracture four exploratory wells at its site on Preston New Road, subject to some conditions.

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The launch of the Ineos Insight Dragon shale supertanker2 [image credit:  scottishenergynews.com]

The launch of the Ineos Insight Dragon shale supertanker2 [image credit: scottishenergynews.com]


The days of North Sea gas and oil dominating the UK energy scene are over as this news demonstrates. If the Scot Nats are insisting on ‘no damage to the environment’ why are the hills and coasts increasingly strewn with towering wind turbines?
H/T GWPF

The first shipment of American shale gas extracted by the controversial fracking technique will arrive in Scotland next month, The Times has learnt.

Industry insiders have confirmed that the first of a fleet of “Dragon-class” ships, each capable of transporting huge quantities of the shale gas ethane, will dock within the next seven weeks.

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nuke-powerIn a surprise move, the UK govt has put the brakes on the Hinkley Point nuclear power contract. Yesterday, there was anticipation in the media that the directorate of EDF would approve the scheme. In the event, the vote was 10 to 7 in favour, though one director resigned beforehand.

Maybe the depth of the split on the EDF board has given the new UK government the jitters. In a brief two line statement this morning, the business secretary, Greg Clark, said the government would now examine all components of the deal and decide in the Autumn whether to go ahead, or not.

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[credit: cityam.com]

[credit: cityam.com]


Jamie Ashcroft in Proactive Investor explains why declining North Sea gas and a weaker pound make a compelling case for pushing on with UK shale gas developments without further delays.
H/T GWPF

The pending exit from the European Union strengthens the argument for the development of Britain’s currently untapped shale gas resources.

Britain’s energy security should be a concern whether it remains in the EU or not, though the vote to leave makes this an increasingly acute issue. Quite simply Britain doesn’t produce enough gas of its own.

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Shale formation for natural gas in Pennsylvania, USA.  [image credit:  businesskorea.co.kr]

Shale formation for natural gas in Pennsylvania, USA.
[image credit:
businesskorea.co.kr]


Another setback for fear-and-doubt merchants with this legal victory for shale gas development, as Somewhat Reasonable reports. Lack of evidence perhaps?

On Monday, May 2 the Colorado Supreme Court ruled on what the New York Times (NYT) called: “a lengthy battle for energy production.” The court’s unanimous decision to strike down two cities’ limits on fracking is a victory for oil-and-gas companies and a “disappointment” to anti-fossil-fuel activists. 

Several states, including Colorado’s neighbors, New Mexico and Texas, have faced similar anti-oil-and-gas initiatives that have also been shot down.

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[credit: cityam.com]

[credit: cityam.com]


Certain cake-baking celebrities won’t want to read this.

First supplies of shale gas, extracted using the unconventional fracking process, could enter the British gas market as early as mid-2017, the head of shale gas firm Cuadrilla Resources told Reuters on Friday.
H/T GWPF

Britain is estimated to have substantial amounts of shale gas trapped in underground rocks and Prime Minister David Cameron has pledged to go all out to extract those reserves to help offset declining North Sea oil and gas output.

But progress has been slow as applications for shale gas projects have been held up at local government level where they have faced vocal opposition from environmental campaigners.

Cuadrilla initially wants to carry out fracking — which injects water, sand and chemicals into rock formations to release shale gas — at two sites in northwest England.

It hopes to get government approval to start operations at the sites before August.

“If we get good results from the wells … gas could go into the system next year,” said Francis Egan, chief executive of Cuadrilla, 46 percent owned by Australian engineer AJ Lucas.

Gas flows from initial testing would be small but Egan said full production could start in 2018 if necessary permits are obtained.

Lancashire Council last year rejected Cuadrilla applications for fracking at the sites, underscoring local community concerns about the technique.

However, Britain has since changed planning rules to allow government intervention to approve or reject shale gas drilling permits and give priority to appeals involving the projects.

A planning inspector is expected to make recommendations on Cuadrilla’s Lancashire applications to local government minister Greg Clark by July 4 and he will then make the final decision.

Egan said he is confident the project will be approved since the government has voiced strong support for the technology, while the local authority had previously received legal advice to approve one of the applications.

The government hopes a shale gas boom will help generate jobs in the oil and gas industry which has been hard hit by a 60 percent slump in oil and gas prices in the last two years.

Source: First Shale Gas Could Hit UK Market In 2017 – Cuadrilla | The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)

US shale gas going to Scotland this year

Posted: April 1, 2016 by oldbrew in Energy, Shale gas

Grangemouth plant [credit: Ineos]

Grangemouth plant [credit: Ineos]


Petrochemicals get overlooked sometimes in discussions about so-called fossil fuels, but their importance in modern life is enormous (plastics, man-made fibres etc.).
H/T GWPF

Scotland’s energy sector is in line for a major boost as Ineos announced it will reopen a second production line at Grangemouth. The company has successfully completed operational trials as it prepares to receive shale gas ethane from the USA.

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North Sea oil and gas - a sunset industry? [image credit: matchtech.com]

North Sea oil and gas – a sunset industry? [image credit: matchtech.com]


The notion of an independent Scotland boosting its economy with the proceeds of North Sea oil may be looking a bit threadbare after the recent slump in the price of oil, but there could be another way forward as E&T Magazine reports.

Scotland should embrace fracking in order to gain economic independence from England according to the chief executive of chemicals company Ineos.

Jim Ratcliffe made his comments prior to a debate on the issue held today by the Scottish National Party (SNP) at its conference in Aberdeen, where party members narrowly rejected a bid to toughen up the stance on fracking amid calls for an outright ban.
Ineos has acquired fracking exploration licences across 700 square miles of central Scotland.

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