Archive for the ‘wind’ Category

How big can wind turbine blades get? [image credit: scancomark.com]

How big can wind turbine blades get? [image credit: scancomark.com]


Monster ‘SUMR’ wind turbines are on the US drawing board, says ScienceDaily. SUMO more like?

A new design for gigantic blades longer than two football fields could help bring offshore 50-megawatt (MW) wind turbines to the United States and the world. Sandia National Laboratories’ research on the extreme-scale Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor (SUMR) is funded by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy program.

The challenge: Design a low-cost offshore 50-MW turbine requiring a rotor blade more than 650 feet (200 meters) long, two and a half times longer than any existing wind blade.

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NOAA’s vandalism of ERSSTv3b2 (good) to ERSSTv4 (corrupted) hinges on a single point.

Visual catalog of the beautiful natural patterns being systematically defaced:

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1. Secular

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Going through one of the old PRP shutdown threads I spotted a comment from regular A C Osborn I missed in all the hubbub. It linked to this thread on Bishop Hill, and I thought I’d repost it here for some consideration, since it’s right in our ~60yr oscillation in LOD ballpark. His grace’s intro follows:

Reader Paul K (a regular writer at Lucia’s) left this fascinating comment on the thread about the England trade winds paper. As BH regulars know, I don’t spend a lot of time on alternative theories of climate change, but I felt this was worthy of an airing.

As Nic correctly points out, from the observed data, the total global ocean heat flux shows a peak around 2001-2005 depending on which dataset one takes. TOA radiative measurements show a peak in net radiative incoming flux somewhere around 1997-2000, driven largely by SW changes in net albedo. Modern MSL data from satellite altimetry (or indeed from tide gauge data) shows a peak in its derivative function around 2001-2003, which should also be a proxy for net heat flux going into the ocean. (Using gravimetric data from GRACE, we can rule out the possibility that the peak in MSL derivative was caused by mass addition – it is a peak clearly driven by thermosteric expansion. There is a useful presentation here by Nerem.

So there is a consistent story from three data sources which says that the net incoming flux hit a peak and has since been decreasing overall for about a decade. This is not compatible with increasing forcing from GHGs and flat or declining tropospheric temperature – a mini paradox, if you will.

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Dogger Bank here we come [image credit: Siemens]

Dogger Bank here we come [image credit: Siemens]


Not only that – this report states the UK wind energy sector has ‘a development pipeline valued at $182bn’. Eye-watering figures.

As the threat of falling behind on 2020 carbon reduction targets looms for some European countries, investment in renewable power projects will be the big winner in the race to catch up, with nuclear power projects losing their number-one slot.

This is according to a new report, ‘Project Insight: Power Generation Construction Projects in Europe’, from analysis firm Timetric’s Construction Analysis Centre (CIC).  The report found that investment in renewable projects is expected to increase significantly in the next five years, with wind power attracting the highest investment.

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Offshore wind farm [image credit: Wikipedia]

Offshore wind farm [image credit: Wikipedia]


Is this part of the future for wind power, or just another doomed idea?

The search for new ways to produce energy are often complicated and controversial – and in Northern Ireland, a project to compress air into caverns under the seabed is no different.

It will be used, along with gas, to run turbines when the wind does not blow.

However some are worried that the process could be damaging to the natural habitat, as a short BBC video reports.

Well, it’s different if nothing else.

U.S. Offshore Wind: A Government Pipe Dream 

Posted: October 7, 2015 by oldbrew in Energy, government, wind
Tags:

Troubled waters for US wind power?

Troubled waters for US wind power?


Economic, engineering, legal and political problems are plaguing the advance of the US government’s offshore wind dream, reports Master Resource.

“Offshore wind is essentially a government-made market that would not exist in the U.S. but for a massive intervention from Washington and an ‘at-any-cost’ mentality at the state level. Of the alleged 15,650 MW of offshore wind in DOE’s pipeline, a very small fraction represents projects proffered by private entities.”

It’s official. At a White House summit last month, the Obama administration publicly backed its new government program – offshore wind. With America’s first offshore project now under construction, and the Department of Energy’s (DOE) latest analysis  showing 21 projects totaling 15,650 megawatts in the works, the political boost could trigger a development boom.

But don’t count on it. The already uneconomic on land is only worse off in the waters.

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21st Century Scottish landscape

21st Century Scottish landscape


Wind Watch News highlights a press report on the problems faced by ‘low flyers’ due to large numbers of wind turbines sprouting up without warning near their flying routes over the Scottish mainland.

A “shocking” military dossier reveals a catalogue of potentially catastrophic air safety incidents, many of them related to unlit turbines and new or uncharted developments. However, the Ministry of Defence withheld more information on national security grounds meaning the real number could be much higher.

Last night, campaigners called for an urgent review of the mapping and lighting of wind turbines to prevent a fatal crash involving a low-flying aircraft. The 59 near-misses were classified from negligible to high in terms of severity with 15 cases – most of them from RAF Lossiemouth in Moray – in the high-risk category.

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QBO rough analysis

Posted: September 13, 2015 by tchannon in Analysis, wind

This is a quick rough and ready analysis of an QBO data since Paul Vaughan asked. Here are all the things you never wanted to know.

QBO ( Quasi-Biennial Oscillation) is a strange entity, wind direction alternates. The data is an index, artificial computation and in this case part of a reanalysis. This article might add some insight http://www.geo.fu-berlin.de/en/met/ag/strat/produkte/qbo

A problem I see with simple data such as at one pressure level and location is the many other changes over time. Perhaps the pressure level should vary a little. It’s a multi-dimension entity anyway.

I’m taking it as-is with no more comment.

Image

Figure 1, straight plot of monthly data, which runs from 1948. No units are given so assume metres/second. Data used

The author has several bespoke software works useful for analysis, in C, unpublished so reproducing this work would be difficult.

On considering the data the period before 1970 is ignored. There is no information on technology changes or data reliability.

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Makarieva and Gorschov

Makarieva and Gorschov

Our old friend Anastassia Makarieva has a new paper in press with her colleagues Victor Gorschov and A.V. Nefiodov: ‘Empirical evidence for the condensational theory of hurricanes’. A preprint is available here. This theory is an extension of her earlier work on where winds come from, which we discussed a couple of years ago.

The new paper concludes with this:

We derived the relationship between the gravitational power of precipitation and air velocity in the windwall from the previously developed theory of condensation-induced dynamics [3,5]. We emphasize that the gravitational power of precipitation exists irrespective of the dissipation of the kinetic energy of hurricanes (distinct from the interpretation given in work [2]). The hurricane power budget would remain the same even if precipitation occurred in free fall with rain drops not interacting with atmospheric air.

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Wind-powered train travel is on Dutch rail schedule

Posted: August 29, 2015 by oldbrew in Travel, wind
Tags:

[image credit: railway-technology.com]

[image credit: railway-technology.com]


The train now standing at Platform 1 is waiting for the wind to blow. Is that the future for Dutch railways? Peering through the hype, we may suspect other sources of power will have to be used if or when it’s not windy enough. TechXplore boards the green-tinged bandwagon:

Can the Dutch rail network run on wind? Julian Turner, writing in Railway-technology.com, reported that the Dutch rail network will run entirely on renewable wind energy by 2018.

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Wind turbines: how big is too big?

Posted: August 13, 2015 by oldbrew in Energy, innovation, wind
Tags:

Yes and no [image credit: Clean Technica]

Yes and no [image credit: Clean Technica]


Size matters with wind turbines because, as one developer put it, ‘You have the ability to get all the oink out of the pig’. But too big means difficulties arise, such as means of delivery. Wind Energy News investigates.

From megawatts to the size of rotors, everything about wind turbines has been getting bigger.

But even proponents of wind power say they may be reaching a limit as logistics and a lack of social acceptance over their size start to hinder growth.

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Windy enough today?

Windy enough today?


There goes another £8 billion pounds or so for unreliable part-time power.

The second half of the world’s biggest offshore wind farm, which will be built in the North Sea, has received planning consent from the Government, as E & T Magazine reports.

The Dogger Bank Teesside A and B project proposed by the Forewind consortium of SSE, RWE, Statkraft and Statoil would see as many as 400 turbines built around 100 miles off England’s North East coast, with the potential to power roughly two million homes.

The Government granted a similar sized scheme, also at Dogger Bank, planning consent in February, and combined, the two adjacent projects would be the world’s biggest offshore wind farm.

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[image credit: beforeitsnews.com]

[image credit: beforeitsnews.com]


Another no-punches-pulled analysis from StopTheseThings (STT). Is this really what people want?

In yesterday’s post – The Wind Industry: Always and Everywhere the Result of Massive & Endless Subsidies (Part 1) – we covered the fact that the Australian wind industry exists – and ONLY exists – for one single purpose: to wallow in a subsidy stream which will hit A$3 billion annually in 2019; and continue at that colossal rate until 2031.

From hereon, the cost of the greatest subsidy rort in the history of the Commonwealth will exceed A$45 billion – every last cent of which will be recovered from Australian power consumers through retail power bills.

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A suitable site for wind turbines? [image credit: Hurriyet News]

A suitable site for wind turbines? [image credit: Hurriyet News]


The Archaeology News Network reports on a startling example of renewables madness:

Turkey’s Cultural and Natural Heritage Preservation Board has refused to declare a plot of land in Istanbul’s Silivri district as a first-degree archaeological site despite the discovery of artifacts from the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras. Now, the artefacts face an even greater threat as a wind-power company has indicated that it wants to cover the findings and continue constructing 21 wind turbines.

Historical artefacts were discovered during the construction of Silivri Energy A.Ş.’s wind power plant belonging to businessman Abdullah Tivnikli in the village last February.

Among the artefacts were many Hellenistic- and Roman-era tombs and one-meter walls.

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[image credit: BBC Scotland]

[image credit: BBC Scotland]


From ‘green bank’ to green blank:

Australia has slammed the door shut on any new government-funded investment in renewable energy schemes as Prime Minister Tony Abbott extends his “war on wind power”, reports Breitbart News.

In doing so Mr Abbott has sent a clear message to the mendicant green renewable energy sector that there will be no more cheap state-supplied financing for its projects.

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[credit: NASA]

[credit: NASA]


A few weeks ago we put up a post to discuss the role of convection in the Earth’s atmosphere:
Beginner’s guide to convection cells

The introduction, linked to a short video, said:
‘When you warm air, it rises. Cool air will sink. This process of convection can lead to flows in the atmosphere, in a manner that we can illustrate [see video] on a small scale. Warm and cool air in a fish tank rise and fall; this motion is made visible by adding fog. Ultimately, the motion leads to a convection cell, with air rising, moving to the side, falling, and moving back. This heat-driven motion of air moves heat around in the atmosphere. It is also responsible for making the wind blow.’

That may have seemed straightforward to some, but a few hundred comments later controversy continues, so we’re starting a new post using this website for reference : Lapse Rate, Moisture, Clouds and Thunderstorms

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Paul Vaughan has produced a six page .pdf document crammed with the fruits of his research into the ways in which solar variation affects Earth’s climate. Several of the observations and concepts coincide with the work we have been doing here at the talkshop over the last six years to unravel the mysteries of solar system dynamics and their effect on Terrestrial variation. Paul has applied his stats and visualisation skills and thorough approach to referencing, including direct links to data. This has resulted in a landmark document which readers will find both useful and inspiring. It demonstrates the progress that has been made in solar-terrestrial theory, (with hints about the underlying planetary solar relations too).

vaughan-s-t-primer

 

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A dying breed?

A dying breed?


A drastic energy policy change by the new UK government as GWPF reports:

Local residents will be able to block all future onshore wind farms under new measures to be fast-tracked into law, the new energy secretary has announced. “It will mean no more onshore wind farm subsidies and no more onshore wind farms without local community support.”

Amber Rudd revealed she had “put a rocket” under her officials to “put the local community back in charge” of their own neighbourhoods.

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US hurricane [image credit: NOAA]

US hurricane [image credit: NOAA]


Global warming pundits have failed miserably with regard to US hurricane frequency in recent years. NASA investigates:

The United States hasn’t experienced the landfall of a Category 3 or larger hurricane in nine years – a string of years that’s likely to come along only once every 177 years, according to a new NASA study.

The current nine-year “drought” is the longest period of time that has passed without a major hurricane making landfall in the U.S. since reliable records began in 1850, said Timothy Hall, a research scientist who studies hurricanes at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York.

Statistical analyses from hurricane track data indicate that for any particular Atlantic Hurricane season, there is about a 40 percent chance that a major hurricane (category 3 or higher) will make landfall in the continental United States. However, during the period from 2006 to 2014, no major hurricanes have made landfall.

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Global circulation of Earth's atmosphere displaying Hadley cell, Ferrell cell and polar cell [credit: NASA]

Global circulation of Earth’s atmosphere displaying Hadley cell, Ferrell cell and polar cell [credit: NASA]


Introducing by popular demand (?) [click to view]:
‘Convection Cells Move Air Around’ (short video) – Windows to the Universe.

When you warm air, it rises. Cool air will sink. This process of convection can lead to flows in the atmosphere, in a manner that we can illustrate [see video] on a small scale. Warm and cool air in a fish tank rise and fall; this motion is made visible by adding fog. Ultimately, the motion leads to a convection cell, with air rising, moving to the side, falling, and moving back. This heat-driven motion of air moves heat around in the atmosphere. It is also responsible for making the wind blow.

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Cue discussion by Talkshop commenters :-)

This post arose from a discussion on another thread that seems to have started somewhere around here.

Larger version of the NASA graphic here.
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Update – a newer post (2015/06/11) can now be viewed here:
Atmospheric convection – what does it mean?
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[comments are now closed on this thread – see ‘Update’ above]