Archive for the ‘wind’ Category

A suitable site for wind turbines? [image credit: Hurriyet News]

A suitable site for wind turbines? [image credit: Hurriyet News]


The Archaeology News Network reports on a startling example of renewables madness:

Turkey’s Cultural and Natural Heritage Preservation Board has refused to declare a plot of land in Istanbul’s Silivri district as a first-degree archaeological site despite the discovery of artifacts from the Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras. Now, the artefacts face an even greater threat as a wind-power company has indicated that it wants to cover the findings and continue constructing 21 wind turbines.

Historical artefacts were discovered during the construction of Silivri Energy A.Ş.’s wind power plant belonging to businessman Abdullah Tivnikli in the village last February.

Among the artefacts were many Hellenistic- and Roman-era tombs and one-meter walls.

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[image credit: BBC Scotland]

[image credit: BBC Scotland]


From ‘green bank’ to green blank:

Australia has slammed the door shut on any new government-funded investment in renewable energy schemes as Prime Minister Tony Abbott extends his “war on wind power”, reports Breitbart News.

In doing so Mr Abbott has sent a clear message to the mendicant green renewable energy sector that there will be no more cheap state-supplied financing for its projects.

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[credit: NASA]

[credit: NASA]


A few weeks ago we put up a post to discuss the role of convection in the Earth’s atmosphere:
Beginner’s guide to convection cells

The introduction, linked to a short video, said:
‘When you warm air, it rises. Cool air will sink. This process of convection can lead to flows in the atmosphere, in a manner that we can illustrate [see video] on a small scale. Warm and cool air in a fish tank rise and fall; this motion is made visible by adding fog. Ultimately, the motion leads to a convection cell, with air rising, moving to the side, falling, and moving back. This heat-driven motion of air moves heat around in the atmosphere. It is also responsible for making the wind blow.’

That may have seemed straightforward to some, but a few hundred comments later controversy continues, so we’re starting a new post using this website for reference : Lapse Rate, Moisture, Clouds and Thunderstorms

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Paul Vaughan has produced a six page .pdf document crammed with the fruits of his research into the ways in which solar variation affects Earth’s climate. Several of the observations and concepts coincide with the work we have been doing here at the talkshop over the last six years to unravel the mysteries of solar system dynamics and their effect on Terrestrial variation. Paul has applied his stats and visualisation skills and thorough approach to referencing, including direct links to data. This has resulted in a landmark document which readers will find both useful and inspiring. It demonstrates the progress that has been made in solar-terrestrial theory, (with hints about the underlying planetary solar relations too).

vaughan-s-t-primer

 

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A dying breed?

A dying breed?


A drastic energy policy change by the new UK government as GWPF reports:

Local residents will be able to block all future onshore wind farms under new measures to be fast-tracked into law, the new energy secretary has announced. “It will mean no more onshore wind farm subsidies and no more onshore wind farms without local community support.”

Amber Rudd revealed she had “put a rocket” under her officials to “put the local community back in charge” of their own neighbourhoods.

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US hurricane [image credit: NOAA]

US hurricane [image credit: NOAA]


Global warming pundits have failed miserably with regard to US hurricane frequency in recent years. NASA investigates:

The United States hasn’t experienced the landfall of a Category 3 or larger hurricane in nine years – a string of years that’s likely to come along only once every 177 years, according to a new NASA study.

The current nine-year “drought” is the longest period of time that has passed without a major hurricane making landfall in the U.S. since reliable records began in 1850, said Timothy Hall, a research scientist who studies hurricanes at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York.

Statistical analyses from hurricane track data indicate that for any particular Atlantic Hurricane season, there is about a 40 percent chance that a major hurricane (category 3 or higher) will make landfall in the continental United States. However, during the period from 2006 to 2014, no major hurricanes have made landfall.

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Global circulation of Earth's atmosphere displaying Hadley cell, Ferrell cell and polar cell [credit: NASA]

Global circulation of Earth’s atmosphere displaying Hadley cell, Ferrell cell and polar cell [credit: NASA]


Introducing by popular demand (?) [click to view]:
‘Convection Cells Move Air Around’ (short video) – Windows to the Universe.

When you warm air, it rises. Cool air will sink. This process of convection can lead to flows in the atmosphere, in a manner that we can illustrate [see video] on a small scale. Warm and cool air in a fish tank rise and fall; this motion is made visible by adding fog. Ultimately, the motion leads to a convection cell, with air rising, moving to the side, falling, and moving back. This heat-driven motion of air moves heat around in the atmosphere. It is also responsible for making the wind blow.

***
Cue discussion by Talkshop commenters :-)

This post arose from a discussion on another thread that seems to have started somewhere around here.

Larger version of the NASA graphic here.
————————————————————————————————
Update – a newer post (2015/06/11) can now be viewed here:
Atmospheric convection – what does it mean?
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[comments are now closed on this thread – see ‘Update’ above]

Windy Standard wind farm, Scotland [credit: RWE.com]

Windy Standard wind farm, Scotland [credit: RWE.com]


As this Herald Scotland piece points out: ‘Dumfries and Galloway … already has over 200 operational turbines, with a further 333 consented, 260 awaiting consent and at least another 450 ‘at scoping’.’ But major landowners like the Duke of Buccleuch want more – lots more. Martin Williams reports:

PLANS involving one of Britain’s biggest private landowners to develop a windfarm of up to 140 turbines stretching for several miles in Dumfries and Galloway have been described as “insane” by conservationists.

Buccleuch and 2020 Renewables, a prominent windfarm developer, announced they are examining the potential for the significant windfarm in the Lowther Hills, between Sanquhar and Wanlockhead as part of a “major land use strategy”.

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Davey-windFrom the Telegraph:

A plan to build a series of wind farms across a huge swathe of unspoilt countryside has been given the green light but the decision is being kept secret.

The proposed turbines and almost 30 miles of pylons to connect them to the National Grid are so unpopular that Ed Davey, the Energy and Climate Change Secretary and a Liberal Democrat MP, has refused to commit to a planning decision ahead of the general election.

According to sources, three giant wind farms, spread across an area of Mid Wales stretching from Machynlleth to Welshpool, have been agreed but will need rubber-stamping by the incoming secretary of state.

A planning inspector has recommended permission be given for the farms. They each consist of between 17 and 65 turbines up to 450ft tall – equivalent to the height of the London Eye. In all, almost 200 could be built in the coming years.

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Paul Vaughan writes in suggestions:

It’s the wind.

Rial (2012) drew my attention to a fundamental correction that’s underway in oceanography (more notes forthcoming on this later) ….

Lozier, Susan (2010). Deconstructing the conveyor belt. Science 328, 1507-1511.
http://sites.duke.edu/mslozier/files/2010/11/Lozier_2010.pdf
=

Though appealing in its simplicity, the ocean conveyor-belt paradigm has lost luster over the years […] the ocean’s eddy field, unaccounted for just decades ago […] figures prominently in the dismantling of the conveyor-belt paradigm. Another player in this dismantling is the ocean’s wind field. The traditional assignation of surface ocean gyres to wind-forcing and overturning to buoyancy forcing has ignored the vital impact of winds on overturning pathways and mechanics. […] the conveyor-belt model no longer serves the community well […] because it ignores crucial structure and mechanics of the ocean’s intricate global overturning.

[…] wind forcing, rather than buoyancy forcing, can play a dominant role in changing the transport of the overturning […]

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Gold in them there windmills
The Telegraph
Christopher Booker
21 February 2015

The BBC didn’t tell us all the facts in its excitement about a vast new offshore wind farm, writes Christopher Booker

offshore-wind-farm-clouds-wake effectThe BBC naturally got very excited by the news that Ed Davey, our Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, has given the go-ahead to the largest offshore wind farm in the world – 400 monster turbines covering 436 square miles of the North Sea.

What the BBC didn’t mention was that this £8 billion project, producing on average 840 megawatts of electricity, will earn for its mainly Norwegian and German owners some £900 million a year in subsidies, paid by all of us through our electricity bills.

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Wind speed law

Posted: February 21, 2015 by tchannon in weather, wind

I decided to show something useful instead of waiting until perfect data is available.

Image

Frequency plot of wind speed over the whole of the UK. The characteristic is logarithmic.

There are data problems, ignore this please[1].

The Met Office in common with all national meteorological services continue to use cup anemometers rather than eg. ultrasonic This is the advice[2] from WMO (World Meteorological Organisation) specifically to maintain continuity of data for climatic purposes since there are significant differences between cup and other types.

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If this is what devolution does for people, I’m not sure it’s worth the candle.

josh-hammer-of-the-scots

Courtesy of Cartoons by Josh – visit his site and buy something!

A group of land and heritage bodies has joined forces to attack the Scottish government’s wind farm policy.

The rural alliance, including the National Trust for Scotland and Ramblers Scotland, accused ministers of ignoring their own advisers to back controversial large-scale developments.

They said the government had failed to ensure plans are open to “proper and democratic scrutiny”.

The group called for public inquiries over the use of wild areas.

In an open letter, the alliance said the government approved “colossal” developments at Stonelairg in the Monadhliath Mountains and offshore – straddling the firths of Forth and Tay – “in the face of evidence and objections”.

In both cases, it said ministers chose to ignore advice from Scottish Natural Heritage – the government’s own expert advisers.

The statement is signed by the leaders of the Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland, the Mountaineering Council of Scotland, the Munro Society, the National Trust for Scotland, Ramblers Scotland and the Scottish Wild Land Group.

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[image credit: Wikipedia]

[image credit: Wikipedia]

You read it right – ONE wind turbine. Protests against schemes for dozens are lucky to get a mention sometimes.

An agency report for the Telegraph says:

A picturesque Cornish village so loved by the Prime Minister that he named his daughter after it is set to have its rural beauty wrecked by red flashing lights from a large wind turbine, locals say.

David Cameron and wife Samantha christened their fourth child Florence Rose Endellion because they loved holidaying near St Endellion, on the north Cornwall coast.

They are believed to have been enamoured with its simple charm before their daughter was born at the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro in August 2010.

Now villagers, who are already unhappy at plans for the 200ft tall wind turbine, learned it will have to be illuminated at night by red flashing lights because of nearby Ministry of Defence (MoD) radar equipment.

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Oldbrew: The Scottish renewable energy show rumbles on

Posted: January 29, 2015 by tallbloke in Energy, Shale gas, wind
Tags:

The Scottish renewable energy show rumbles on…
josh-hammer-of-the-scots

Scotland’s top judge calls for new ‘energy court’ to handle renewables and shale gas disputes’ (Jan. 29, 2015)

But that idea may already be running out of…er, gas:
The Scottish government has announced a block on planned fracking operations, pending further inquiries. (Jan. 28, 2015)

Meanwhile the RSPB has put the wind up offshore renewable energy developers with legal action.
Now some major projects will be held up for months at least.

‘RSPB Scotland sent shockwaves through the sector in Scotland earlier this month after a last-minute move to seek judicial review of Mr Ewing’s decision to grant consents for the Neart na Gaoithe, Inch Cape and Seagreen Alpha and Bravo arrays.’

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Douglas Carswell MP: The case for wind is running out of puff

Posted: January 21, 2015 by tallbloke in turbines, wind
Tags:

Reposted from Douglas Carswell’s blog:

carswellA Ten Minute Rule Bill to outlaw public subsidies for wind farms has just been voted through the House of Commons. It squeezed through with 59 MPs in favour, and 57 against, the support of UKIP’s two MPs proving decisive.

This wasn’t just a victory for UKIP in the Commons. It was a defeat for the subsdised scam otherwise known as the wind energy industry.

Generating electricity from wind is an inherently costly thing to do. Unlike solar energy, which thanks to technology is becoming vastly more efficient, wind is – and will remain – a far more costly way of producing power than the alternatives.

Nor is it reliable. The other day, as Allister Heath points out, as UK electicity demand hit 52.54 gigawatts (GW), wind contributed just 0.573GW. That is to say about 1pc of the total. It was left to good old gas and coal to contribute the lion’s share of 71 percent.

If wind is not an effective way to generate electricity, why have so many wind turbines been built? Because of the subsidy. Billions of pounds have been deliberately diverted away from more efficient ways of generating energy into wind farms.

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Caught on video, the total collapse of yet another wind turbine. The original facebook video is here. I have saved a copy.

turbine-collapse-germany3
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Did icing damage the Screggagh rotor head?

Posted: January 4, 2015 by tchannon in weather, wind

Roger asked about wind conditions, “I’d like to see the output from the site anenometer so we knew what windspeeds were up there when it went down.” … can’t do that but I can dig…

Bing aerial images of wind farm

A question arises on whether the rotor assembly was damaged during icing conditions, later failing under relatively simple conditions. Water ingress into composite blades is also possible.

Image

SNOW, dated 11th December 2014 at a Met Office site not far away. The Met Office communications failed, quite common with Met Office sites. The wind at the 300 metre ground altitude Screggagh wind farm will have been faster, more so at hub height. Other met sites had snow and rain, wet conditions with a wind. (more…)

This one has folded like a bent straw. Reports from Demotix and The Ulster Herald 80m-turbine-fail1 Part of one of the blades is embedded javelin style in the ground half a mile away. Pic below the break. (more…)

De Bilt reports on yet another serious turbine failure. This time the 100m structure folded at a weld line some 30m off the ground. This is of great concern. Whereas most catastrophic failures are due to installation errors at the base bolts, this is a problem with the specification or execution of the construction of the monocoque structure – the main tower.

turbine-collapse-germany2

There’s a fundamental problem here. When steel is welded, the structure of the material either side of the joint, and the weld itself is different to the rolled steel sheet. This inevitably creates a location where stress gets concentrated more as the structure ages.
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