In limbo - Hinkley C [image credit: EDF]

In limbo – Hinkley C [image credit: EDF]


Something is not quite right with the UK’s nuclear power plans, as this Click Green exclusive shows. Anti-nuclear legal action by Austria and reports of serious technical issues can’t be helping the cause.

The UK’s nuclear watchdog has stopped safety inspections at the planned site of the Hinkley C nuclear power station after EDF Energy ordered a stop to all groundwork, ClickGreen can reveal.

Despite recently publishing a list of preferred suppliers for the £24 billion project, the French firm were in behind-the-scenes talks with the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR), during which they informed them of their decision to mothball the site.

Read the rest of this entry »

A paper of interest to some Talkshop readers

Spin-orbit coupling and chaotic rotation for circumbinary bodies
Application to the small satellites of the Pluto-Charon system

Image

 

Alexandre C. M. Correia, Adrien Leleu, Nicolas Rambaux and Philippe Robutel
http://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/abs/2015/08/aa26800-15/aa26800-15.html
Open access, published 20 August 2015

Abstract

We investigate the resonant rotation of circumbinary bodies in planar quasi-circular orbits. Denoting nb and n the orbital mean motion of the inner binary and of the circumbinary body, respectively, we show that spin-orbit resonances exist at the frequencies n ± k?/2, where ? = nb – n, and k is an integer. Moreover, when the libration at natural frequency has the same magnitude as ?, the resonances overlap and the rotation becomes chaotic. We apply these results to the small satellites in the Pluto-Charon system, and conclude that their rotations are likely chaotic. However, the rotation can also be stable and not synchronous for small axial asymmetries.

Read the rest of this entry »

Decision time [image credit: AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez]

Decision time [image credit: AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez]


After all the political argy-bargy, the final decision on the controversial oil pipeline plan is due as The New Republic explains. But the oil producers are already moving their product in other ways. Whether it’s still worth it with oil down near $40 a barrel is another matter.

Environmentalists have been waiting since 2008 for President Barack Obama’s decision on whether to approve the Keystone XL pipeline. That decision may come any day now. But Canada’s tar sands industry hasn’t been waiting around.

Read the rest of this entry »

Risky business [image credit: safetysource.co.nz]

Risky business [image credit: safetysource.co.nz]


Some might query whether 5 megawatts is ‘giant’ in terms of national electricity demand, and the usual claims that battery costs are going to drop like a stone are made, but nevertheless this attempt at an energy storage system is happening, as edie.net reports.

German energy company E.ON has started constructing the world’s first modular large-scale battery in the German town of Aachen.

The modular aspect of the design means that various battery technologies can be ‘plugged in’ to the system – a world-first for a battery of this size.

Read the rest of this entry »

An Amber light on chicanery: avoiding EU

Posted: August 20, 2015 by tchannon in Energy, government, Legal, Politics

Centralism is also lunacy when one set of rules are applied to different, a northern Atlantic island is the same as Austria or Italy, bull. nevertheless which fools signed up to broken?

OTOH does this mean paying Germany? If not who?

Here is a report of unknown provenance given Reuters track record

UK may use EU small print to swerve impact of green cuts
LONDON | By Susanna Twidale

Britain is thinking of using an EU loophole to dodge the impact of its own subsidy cuts on renewable energy and escape fines for missing 2020 European renewable targets.

Under EU rules Britain could use the loophole, termed statistical transfer, which would see it pay other, greener, EU countries overshooting their targets, to make up the difference.

“We need to stay open to the fullest possible range of options for meeting the 2020 target, including the use of statistical transfer,” a spokeswoman for the Department of Energy and Climate Change said.

Britain’s new Energy and Climate Change secretary Amber Rudd has announced changes to subsides for biomas [sic], solar and onshore wind projects to trim spiraling [sic] costs, which she said in June were likely to result in around 250 projects not being built.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2015/08/20/uk-britain-renewables-target-idUKKCN0QP17T20150820

Read the rest of this entry »

From the top: Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter [image credit: NASA/JPL]

From the top: Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter
[image credit: NASA/JPL]


Continuing our quest to understand more about planetary frequencies, we turn to links between the largest planet Jupiter and the two ‘outer’ giant planets, Uranus and Neptune.

This model is based on a match of synodic periods, which is found to be:
22 Uranus-Neptune (U-N) = 273 Jupiter-Uranus (J-U) = 295 Jupiter-Neptune (J-N)

The period is just under 3771 years (~3770.93y).
To find a link to Fibonacci numbers we can look first at Jupiter-Uranus:
273 J-U = 13 x 21 (13 and 21 are Fibonacci numbers)

Read the rest of this entry »

More licences released for fracking in the U.K.

Posted: August 18, 2015 by Andrew in Energy

imageTodays announcement sees 2,700 sq Km, mostly covering Yorkshire and the Midlands, opened up to Fracking as the Government tries to breath new life into a stalling energy sector. Read the rest of this entry »

Bye-bye Longannet [image credit: BBC]

Bye-bye Longannet [image credit: BBC]


It’s only a matter of time before increasing dependency on renewables proves to be a mistake. Details from the BBC: RIP Longannet power station.

Scotland’s last coal-fired power station, Longannet in Fife, is to close on 31 March next year.

Its owner, Scottish Power, said the high cost of connecting to the grid was to blame.

The company has also announced it is abandoning plans to build a new gas-fired power station at Cockenzie in East Lothian.

Longannet, which opened in 1972, is one of the biggest coal-fired power stations in Europe.

Read the rest of this entry »

A bit less of this to look forward to? [image credit: traveldailynews.com]

A bit less of this to look forward to? [image credit: traveldailynews.com]


Some solar theories will be put to the test in the next few decades by the Sun’s ongoing behaviour patterns.

Is Earth slowly heading for a new ice age? Looking at the decreasing number of sunspots, it may seem that we are entering a nearly spotless solar cycle which could result in lower temperatures for decades. “The solar cycle is starting to decline. Now we have less active regions visible on the sun’s disk,” Yaireska M. Collado-Vega, a space weather forecaster at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, told Phys.org.

But does it really mean a colder climate for our planet in the near future? In 1645, the so-called Maunder Minimum period started, when there were almost no sunspots. It lasted for 70 years and coincided with the well-known “Little Ice Age”, when Europe and North America experienced lower-than-average temperatures. However, the theory that decreased solar activity caused the climate change is still controversial as no convincing evidence has been shown to prove this correlation.

Read the rest of this entry »

Famous name

Image

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1978 (Smithsonian Institution)

Most news feeds have items and there is at least one current photograph, many are not, 400 people evacuated as a precaution, this volcano has previous. Ash has fallen in Quito. Earth tremors started during May/June but no major eruption is forecast.

Cotopaxi is a stratovolcano that has erupted 50 times since 1738. The 1877 eruption melted snow and ice on the summit, which produced mudflows that traveled 60 miles (100 km) from the volcano. The most recent eruption of Cotopaxi ended in 1904. Reports of an eruption in 1942 have not been confirmed. The most recent activity was an increase in steam emissions, melting snow, and small earthquakes from 1975-1976

http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/cotopaxi

Enjoy

http://earthquake-report.com/2015/04/02/volcano-news-by-volcanologist-janine-krippner/ (and donate if you are flush)

Read the rest of this entry »

[credit: softpedia.com]

[credit: softpedia.com]


Phys.org is running an article headed: On Wikipedia, politically controversial science topics vulnerable to information sabotage. This is no great surprise apart possibly from the fact that it’s being openly discussed by academics.

Wikipedia reigns. It’s the world’s most popular online encyclopedia, the sixth most visited website in America, and a research source most U.S. students rely on. But, according to a paper published today in the journal PLOS ONE, Wikipedia entries on politically controversial scientific topics can be unreliable due to information sabotage.

Read the rest of this entry »

oldbrew:

.
.
Yet another inconvenient story to be swept under the ‘official climate science’ carpet.

Originally posted on NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT:

By Paul Homewood

image

We are supposed to believe that Antarctic glaciers have only recently started to recede.

Back in 1932, they knew that the process had begun in the 19thC.

image

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/23150667

Sir James Ross undertook his expeditions to the Antarctic in the 1840’s.

Interestingly, Bernacchi accompanied Scott on the 1901-04 Antarctic expedition. and Scott was best man at his colleague’s wedding in 1906. Bernacchi was invited to go on Scott’s ill fated second expedition, but declined due to family commitments.

View original

Time To Connect The Dots

Posted: August 14, 2015 by oldbrew in alarmism, Idiots, Incompetence, media
Tags: ,

oldbrew:

.
.
New York Times 2005: ‘Hurricanes have therefore become bigger and more destructive and are likely to grow even more violent in the future.

This cycle cannot be reversed any time soon.’

Climate fortune telling is a risky business.

Originally posted on Real Science:

Ten years ago, experts told us that hurricanes like Katrina and Rita were the new normal, due to global warming.

ScreenHunter_10077 Aug. 14 09.07

Time to Connect the Dots – The New York Times

The period since has been the quietest on record for US hurricanes, with no major (category 3-5) hurricanes.

ScreenHunter_10076 Aug. 14 09.02

Weather Street: 2015 Atlantic Hurricanes and Tropical Storms

It is time to connect the dots, and recognize that climate experts have absolutely no idea what they are talking about.

View original

[image credit: etsy.com]

[image credit: etsy.com]


Something a bit off-beat here: a paper entitled ‘The Multiperiodic Pulsating Star Y Cam A as a Musical Instrument’. A music extract can be played in the linked Phys.org report. It’s described as ‘a mixed bag of eerie pulsating sounds combined with a simple piano melody.’

Astronomer Burak Ulaş, with the Izmir Turk College Planetarium in Turkey has taken his work into a musical dimension, using star oscillations as a source for a musical composition. He has uploaded a paper describing what he has done along with sheet music and an audio recording of his work to the preprint server arXiv—along with a shout-out to other pioneers in the field, from Kepler to Pythagoras to modern composer scientists Jenő Keuler and Zoltán Kolláth.

Astronomers and other star-gazers have long associated celestial bodies with music, the twinkling of some stars offers a tempting back-beat and some stars in particular offer a variety of opportunities. One such star, Y Cam A, Ulaş noted, offered enough oscillation data for its use in creating chords.

Read the rest of this entry »

Wind turbines: how big is too big?

Posted: August 13, 2015 by oldbrew in Energy, innovation, wind
Tags:

Yes and no [image credit: Clean Technica]

Yes and no [image credit: Clean Technica]


Size matters with wind turbines because, as one developer put it, ‘You have the ability to get all the oink out of the pig’. But too big means difficulties arise, such as means of delivery. Wind Energy News investigates.

From megawatts to the size of rotors, everything about wind turbines has been getting bigger.

But even proponents of wind power say they may be reaching a limit as logistics and a lack of social acceptance over their size start to hinder growth.

Read the rest of this entry »

Spin doctor at work

Spin doctor at work


Cato at Liberty reports from the US on the myth of carbon dioxide as ‘carbon pollution’, when in fact it’s essential to life on Earth. What we really have is state-sponsored mind pollution.

The Spin Cycle is a reoccurring feature based upon just how much the latest weather or climate story, policy pronouncement, or simply poo-bah blather spins the truth. Statements are given a rating between 1-5 spin cycles, with less cycles meaning less spin.

President Obama is keen on calling carbon dioxide emitted from our nation’s fossil fuel-powered energy production, “carbon pollution.” For example, last week, when introducing EPA’s Clean Power Plan—new regulations limiting carbon dioxide emissions from the power plants that currently produce 67 percent of the country’s electricity—he used the term “carbon pollution” ten times. For example:

Read the rest of this entry »

oldbrew:

.
.
So this is what they mean by ‘runaway climate change’.

Originally posted on American Elephants:

climate-changeThe Climate Change Business Journal has calculated that Climate Change is now its own $1.5 trillion global “climate change industry” that is growing at between 17 and 24 percent annually from 2005-2008. Following the recession, growth slowed to between 4 to 6 percent with the exception of a bump in 2011 of 15 percent growth. These results were published in the Insurance Journal, for the climate journal is not available for free online.

The publication includes nine segments and 38 sub-segments including renewables, green building and hybrid cars. It also includes the climate change consulting market which the journal estimates at $1.9 billion worldwide, and $890 million in the U.S. The consulting market is expected to double in the next five years. The report’s authors believe the climate change industry as a whole will grow even faster. The Climate Change Consulting market  had billings of $600 million in 1976 and…

View original 124 more words

Charging station [image credit: Dean Wormald]

Charging station [image credit: Dean Wormald]


The UK has an impressively large development budget for its so-far unimpressively small collection of electric cars, as Phys.org reports. Is there any high-tech cure for ‘range anxiety’?

Wireless charging technology that is built into the road, powering electric cars as they move, is to undergo trials on England’s offroads. Announced on Tuesday, the technology will address the need to power up electric and hybrid vehicles on England’s roads. The trials will get under way later this year.

Read the rest of this entry »

Solar — Hide The Decline

Posted: August 11, 2015 by tchannon in Accountability, Analysis, Incompetence

Couple of days ago oldbrew posted an article highlighting an article at phys.org, one thing leads to another

Image

Figure 1, Annotated copy of plot. from mis-rendering web page where mis-render covered the time scale.

Image

Figure 2, screen capture from web browser showing misrendering hiding the time scale and that tripped “why?”

The caption makes claim of a comparison but makes no mention of omitting recent data which does differ between the two versions (see fig 6). Additionally the plot start is 1749 as the monthly time series but the data plotted is the annual time series not the monthly.

Image

Figure 3, reproduction of the dubious work using WDC-SILO data except showing all the data, less the very early part as above.

Read the rest of this entry »

Oh my, The Sun, still is.

Enjoy

The Sunspots 2.0? Irrelevant. The Sun, still is.
By shaviv

After being asked by 5 independent people about the new sunspot number reconstruction and that it doesn’t show that the sun should have contributed any warming to the 20th century, I decided to write about it here. I have one word to describe it – irrelevant. It is also a good opportunity to write about new results (well, one that saw the light of day a few months ago) showing again that the sun has a large effect on climate. Yet, the world will still continue to ignore it. Am I surprised? No I’m not.
http://www.sciencebits.com/sunspots_2.0

Read the rest of this entry »