Posts Tagged ‘electricity’

[image credit: beforeitsnews.com]


Until we hear that wind and solar power to generate electricity will be adequate 24/7 without $trillions spent on unfathomably large quantities of batteries, other cost discussions – while obviously important – are of secondary interest. But big numbers may fool some folk.
– – –
Yesterday, the Green media was getting extremely excited about a new paper, which claimed that renewable energy was going to save society millions and billions and trillions of pounds by 2050 (or something like that), writes Andrew Montford.

Ten trillion pounds by 2050 said the BBC.

As readers here know, I keep a close eye on the cost of renewables, and have published papers on both offshoreand onshorewind, showing that the financial accounts of operators in both sectors show no sign of significant cost reductions.

It’s not just me either: my findings closely match those of the energy economist, Professor Gordon Hughes, the energy analyst Kathryn Porter, and an important paper in the peer reviewed literature.

(more…)

A computer-generated image of Apple’s first Irish data centre [credit: Apple]


Internet rationing ahead? If renewables were so great and so cheap the data centres could provide their own electricity.
– – –
Every time we make a call on Zoom, upload a document to the cloud or stream a video, our computers connect to vast warehouses filled with servers to store or access data, says TechXplore.

Not so long ago, European countries were falling over each other to welcome the firms that run these warehouses, known as data centers or bit barns.

Wide-eyed politicians trumpeted investments and dreamt of creating global tech hubs.

But then the dream went sour.

(more…)

[image credit: beforeitsnews.com]


This has been the case since the Climate Change Act was passed in 2008 with minimal political debate, even without ‘perverse loopholes’ in contracts. Renewable energy is in effect a licence to print money.
– – –
London, 1 September: Net Zero Watch has condemned the Government’s green energy policies as “a national disaster.”

This follows the announcement that a major offshore windfarm will not activate an agreement to sell power at a much lower cost to the grid.

The Times has reported that the Hornsea 2 windfarm, which had a contract to sell power at £73 per megawatt hour, will instead sell in the open market, where prices have averaged £200 per megawatt hour this year, and reached £508 last week.

(more…)

Adelaide desalination plant [image credit: Acciona]


Monuments to green stupidity on the rampage.
– – –
Legend says that if you displeased the King of Siam, he would give you a white elephant, writes Viv Forbes (via Climate Change Dispatch).

These rare and protected elephants were incredibly expensive to keep.

So a “White Elephant” came to mean a possession that is useless, troublesome, expensive to maintain, and difficult to dispose of – like a Sacred Cow, but much bigger.

Today, the deluded rulers of the Western world are gifting us and future generations with plagues of Green Elephants – useless, expensive, protected green rubbish.

(more…)

Image credit: thecount.com


Ministers ‘insist’ there will be no blackouts, but is anyone comforted by that? They’ve already contracted some extra power from coal that was supposed to be being phased out. Maybe they’re relying on the high price of energy cutting demand.
– – –
A regular emergency planning exercise to help the UK prepare for the possibility of a shortage of gas supplies has been doubled in size, reports BBC News.

Potential scenarios – including rationing electricity – will be wargamed over four days, rather than the usual two, as energy concerns grow.

The government insists there is no risk to UK energy supplies and consumers should not panic.

(more…)

Brayton cycle [image credit: Wikipedia]


Efficiency gains can be made as ‘energy is lost turning steam back into water’, which doesn’t apply to the CO2. Whether the idea can be scaled up to full electricity grid level isn’t yet known.
– – –
Sandia National Laboratories researchers recently delivered electricity produced by a new power-generating system to the Sandia-Kirtland Air Force Base electrical grid, says Green Car Congress.

The system uses heated supercritical carbon dioxide instead of steam to generate electricity and is based on a closed-loop Brayton cycle.

The Brayton cycle is named after 19th century engineer George Brayton, who developed this method of using hot, pressurized fluid to spin a turbine, much like a jet engine.

Supercritical carbon dioxide is a non-toxic, stable material that is under so much pressure it acts like both a liquid and a gas.

(more…)

Air conditioning sign
[image credit: BBC]


‘Is propane a solution for more sustainable air conditioning?’ asks TechXplore. We put the question another way in our headline. The article asserts: ‘Apart from the rise in energy consumption, space-coolers also threaten the environment in different ways…’. So someone has concluded that rises in energy consumption – meaning electricity here – are a threat of some sort to the environment. One question then might be: where does that leave electric vehicles, or data centres, for example? The IEA estimates ‘that by 2025, data centres will consume 1/5 of the world’s power supply’.
– – –
Current severe heatwaves that will likely increase in severity and frequency in the future are driving a rise in the use of air conditioners, threatening the environment with their high energy consumption and refrigerants with high warming potential.

A new study finds that switching to propane as a refrigerant could lessen the global temperature increase from space cooling.

We spend enormous amounts of energy on fighting off the heat in the summer, or throughout the whole year at lower latitudes—about one-tenth of the total worldwide electricity supply.

(more…)

.
.
‘Energy transition’ means: “Energy availability depends on weather.” You probably knew that, but many who apparently don’t will find out soon enough.

STOP THESE THINGS

Delusional reliance on unreliable wind and solar is a reason that governments are interfering in consumers’ power usage. Pitched under the euphemism “demand management”, state-controlled power rationing is the natural consequence of attempting to run on sunshine and breezes.

When the sun sets and calm weather sets in, wind and solar power can’t be bought at any price. Increase the capacity of the unreliables connected to your grid and get ready for not only rocketing power bills, but routine power rationing.

Once upon a time, electricity was cheap and it flowed like running water. Civil and ordered society demanded it.

These days, smart meters keep an eye on your power usage with the state ready to pull the plug without warning and without notice, notwithstanding that you are ready, willing and able to pay your bill.

The ability to slash your power usage is an altogether insidious exercise of power…

View original post 1,425 more words

Hornsea wind project


At least they admit solar panels don’t like too much sun: ‘work much less well in high temperatures’. But high pressure systems often mean very low wind speeds.
– – –
The ongoing drought in the UK and Europe is putting electricity generation under pressure, say experts.

Electricity from hydropower – which uses water to generate power – has dropped by 20% overall, says BBC News.

And nuclear facilities, which are cooled using river water, have been restricted.

There are fears that the shortfalls are a taste of what will happen in the coming winter.

(more…)

German coal operation


Germany’s assorted energy fixations or ‘green dreams’ have caught up with it in a big way. Some are due to climate obsession, others not. Now that expensive gas is hard to come by since the Ukraine conflict started, and its nuclear power is nearly gone, coal is the only option left for reliable electricity generation. Back to the future, except with obsolescent power stations.
– – –
Berlin has realized it will never again import as much energy from Russia as before the Ukraine war.

So the challenge is to wean Germany off its dependence on Russian energy sources, and quickly.

The question is how, says DW.com.

(more…)

Ferrybridge ‘C’ Power Station (1966–2016)
[image credit: Lynne Kirton / Wikipedia]


The estimated global figure is 8 billion tonnes. Under UK ‘net zero’ climate policy, the coal option will soon disappear completely. Then what, when the electricity supply going gets tough? Electricity demand is rising, not falling, and global coal use is expected to do the same.
– – –
As countries are juggling between skyrocketing energy prices and reduced gas flows, it seems that many of them could turn to coal to secure power to keep the lights on in winter, says Energy Live News.

The latest report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) paints a grim picture of the current situation the international energy systems find themselves in.

The IEA’s Coal Market Update report forecasts that global coal demand will return to its record highs this year.

The agency estimates that global coal consumption will rise by 0.8% in 2022 to eight billion tonnes.

(more…)

Biomass on the move [image credit: Drax]


These allegations have been ongoing for years. ‘Renewable’ trees during a supposed climate emergency – how does that work? Maybe the end game is approaching, or more likely some fudge will emerge.
– – –
A power station accused of “greenwashing” which is handed £2.4 million in government subsidies every day must justify its environmental claims, the OECD has said.

Drax’s claim that it generates “carbon neutral” electricity by burning wood is being examined over allegations that it misleads consumers in breach of guidelines set down by governments across the world, reports The Telegraph.

(more…)

More to come? [image credit: thecount.com]


The fruits of climate-obsessed Government energy policies, including dismantling the power station system in favour of part-time renewables, are becoming ever clearer. Needless to say, it doesn’t look good.
– – –
Households could be asked to turn down their thermostats and switch off their lights under Government plans to avoid winter blackouts.

Emergency contingency plans for a gas or electricity supply shortage include public appeals to use less energy, The Telegraph can reveal.

(more…)

Existing Sizewell B nuclear power station


The usual climate/energy malcontents don’t like it, but there’s not much they do like that anyone who values reliability of supply, i.e. most of the public, could or should have confidence in. The main question is: how many years will it be before any electricity is generated from it, assuming nobody pulls the rug away?
– – –
Sizewell C has moved a step closer to starting construction after the Government today gave planning consent for the new power station in Suffolk, says Energy Live News.

Just a few days ago, the UK’s nuclear regulator said the licence application for the proposed Sizewell C nuclear power station in Suffolk met almost all requirements.

The Development Consent Order application was submitted in May 2020 and sets out the range of measures the project will take to mitigate the effects of construction and maximise the benefits for local communities.

(more…)

.
Governments insist that citizens should obsess about the harmless and beneficial trace gas carbon dioxide. What happens to the waste products when the vast new acreages of solar panels expire?

PA Pundits - International

From the team at CFACT ~

By Steve Miller:

The pathway to a green future involves taking millions of acres of pristine wilderness and turning them into fields of windmills and hot expanses of glistening panels.

The Biden Administration’s goal of supplying 40% of the nation’s energy from the sun by 2035 means covering millions of acres of forest and desert habitat with vast solar panel installations fenced off like prisons. It would require 8,800 square miles of land, or 5.6 million acres, to generate that power (leaving out small installations on buildings and the like) — about the size of Rhode Island and Massachusetts combined.

But the push to convert that land from pastoral to energy-productive is galvanizing a new environmental movement, one led by citizen groups and small non-profits rather than the monied green interests arrayed against them — ones ironically accustomed to casting the fossil fuel…

View original post 1,611 more words

Texan wind project [image credit: Newscom]


It’s an obvious problem that politicians ‘would much rather not talk about’, as the article puts it, while noting it may be ‘good news, at least for birds’. Running away from reality isn’t going to work.
– – –
The Texas energy grid has been under severe stress due to a heatwave, and lower than average wind speed means wind energy has been unable to counter demand, says OilPrice.com.

Texas is suffering a major heat wave. Three-digit temperatures are straining the state’s grid and earlier this month prompted ERCOT, the Lone Star State’s grid operator, to ask Texans to conserve energy. It also severely affected wind power generation.

Bloomberg reported this week that wind turbines in Texas are operating at just 8 percent of their capacity because of low wind speeds. This is really unfortunate because demand for electricity is on a strong rise because of the weather.

(more…)


Choose between common sense and climate ideas that don’t work, basically.
– – –
To assess how serious each candidate in the Conservative leadership contest regards the ‘cataclysmic’ energy cost crisis Britain is facing, Net Zero Watch is sending a list of key questions to all candidates to find out where they stand on each of these pressing cost issues.

Dear leadership hopefuls,

As Martin Lewis is warning about a ‘cataclysmic’ energy crisis which threatens to drive up to 10 million people into real poverty this winter, will you put the energy cost and security of supply crisis at the top of the government’s reform agenda?

(more…)

[credit: green lantern electric]


Court actions by so-called green groups are commonplace, but there’s legal pushback from another quarter – against intrusive electricity generation schemes favoured by climate obsessives, with a perceived lack of benefits. Not everyone is buying the endless climate fear campaign.
– – –
A proposal to transport clean hydropower from Canada to the state of Maine has created enough “hoohah” to launch a fierce court battle – possibly signalling trouble for the future of green energy projects across the US, says BBC News.

New England Clean Energy Connect (NECEC) was supposed to be an industry-leading project, transporting 1,200 megawatts of Canadian hydropower to Massachusetts across 145 miles (233 km) of transmission line, and eliminating over three million metric tonnes of carbon emissions every year.

The $1bn (£840m) project, funded by utility company Hydro-Quebec and Central Maine Power (CMP), which is owned by the Spanish energy giant Avangrid, received final approvals, including a Presidential Permit from the US Department of Energy. Construction began in January 2021.

Now, the hydropower project could be dead in the water, after a majority Mainers voted to cancel it last November.

(more…)

Not the latest model


EV drivers must hunt for those elusive working chargers sooner than they were led to believe. And range declines anyway as the battery ages. How shocked are we? Not much.
– – –
Drivers should take advertised electric car ranges with “a pinch of salt”, after research found real-world distances were on average almost a fifth lower than manufacturers’ figures, reports the Telegraph.

Consumer group Which? tested 60 vehicles ranging from large SUVs to smaller cars and found that they had an average range of 192 miles, compared with 238 miles under the official tests used by manufacturers.

With UK drivers facing a ban on sales of new petrol and diesel cars in 2030, there is growing interest in electric models. But worries about running out of charge, known as range anxiety, is a key concern.

(more…)

German Autobahn

Their Government has decided for them what cars they’re to be allowed to have, or not have. Climate obsession allows their leaders to do that apparently, by claiming their transport policies are ‘climate friendly’ or something. The motoring public find themselves backed into a corner.
– – –
A majority of Germans oppose the EU’s planned 2035 ban of combustion engine cars, according to a survey by research institute forsa for UNITI, the German association of small and medium-sized mineral oil companies.

The survey found that 58 percent of respondents are against an outright ban, while 39 percent support it, says Clean Energy Wire.

Nearly two-thirds of respondents also reject a medium or long-term general ban on vehicles with diesel or petrol engines.

(more…)