Royal Society: Storms, floods and droughts: predicting and reporting adverse weather

Posted: February 21, 2013 by Rog Tallbloke in Forecasting, Natural Variation, Uncertainty, weather
Tags: , ,

It might be interesting if someone could attend this free Royal Society event and write it up for the talkshop. We could then compare and contrast the tenor and tone with the proceedings of the workshop run by Tim Palmer that I attended last year at Chicheley Hall, where Judith Curry told the assembled scientists that their models were not fit for purpose. Liz howell was there and came across to me as someone studiously avoiding any discussion of how the BBC presents ‘climate change’. Audio of all the presentations at the link above.

Storms, floods and droughts: predicting and reporting adverse weather

6:30 pm – 7:30 pm on Monday 04 March 2013
at The Royal Society, London

David Shukman, Science Editor for BBC News, in conversation with Professor Tim Palmer FRS and Liz Howell

nulliusEvent details

2012 was one of the “top five wettest years on record”, however the beginning of the year saw a widespread drought across much of the UK. Join David Shukman, Science Editor for BBC News, and Professor Tim Palmer FRS as they discuss extreme and adverse weather conditions with Liz Howell, Head of BBC Weather. How do these events arise, how they are reported, and how can the latest research improve the forecasting of storms or flooding in the future?

David Shukman previously worked at the BBC as European Correspondent, World Affairs Correspondent and Environment and Science Correspondent. He has reported from more than 90 countries, made a dozen trips to the Polar regions and is one of the few journalists to have flown on a weather research flight.

Professor Tim Palmer FRS is a Royal Society Research Professor in Climate Physics at the University of Oxford. He has pioneered the development of techniques to quantify uncertainty in weather and climate forecasts and was previously Head of the Probability Forecast Division at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts.

Liz Howell is Head of BBC weather and develops weather forecasting and presentation through the use of new platforms and technologies. She previously secured the commissioning of 12 highly successful BBC1 documentaries on the 2012 drought.
Attending this event

This event is free to attend and open to all. No tickets are required. Doors open at 6pm and seats will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis.

Website here.

Comments
  1. Stephen Richards says:

    David Shukman previously worked at the BBC as European Correspondent, World Affairs Correspondent and Environment and Science Correspondent. He has reported from more than 90 countries, made a dozen trips to the Polar regions and is one of the few journalists to have flown on a weather research flight.

    and his education is …….. Writing misleading articles ?? Shukman is a follower not a leader or a thinker.

    Liz Howell is Head of BBC weather and develops weather forecasting and presentation through the use of new platforms and technologies. She previously secured the commissioning of 12 highly successful BBC1 documentaries on the 2012 drought.

    All of which have promoted the BBC activists’ lies.

  2. michael hart says:

    Etonian David Shukman has a BA in Geography, which seems good enough for the BBC to have appointed him Science Editor last year in response to criticism of BBC science coverage that spawned the report to the BBC-trust by Steve Jones.

    We know Shukman offers “expert analysis” because the BBC told us so themselves today in an article (by David Shukman) and an additional video (of David Shukman) about a lovely winter expedition in the Caribbean on board the research vessel James Cook.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21520404

    In a minute and twenty four seconds his expert analysis reeled-off a few simple statistics supplied to him, and then he assessed that the white, blind shrimps filmed in the ocean trench “seemed to be having a good time down there”.

    What more could we ask for? Well, the written article closed by informing us that
    “The scientists on the James Cook hope the research will eventually answer two key questions: why and how life evolved in such a seemingly hostile environment.”

    So they’re going to tell us WHY life evolved down there? Wow. Now that’s what I call expert analysis from the BBC science editor.