Using holography to better understand clouds

Posted: October 11, 2015 by oldbrew in Clouds, research, weather
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Cumulus thunderheads near Sao Paulo, Brazil [image credit: Lunar and Planetary Institute]

Cumulus thunderheads near Sao Paulo, Brazil [image credit: Lunar and Planetary Institute]


Another shortcoming of computer models used in climate science is exposed here, as SpaceDaily explains.

As clouds change shape, mixing occurs, as drier air mingles with water-saturated air. New research led by Michigan Technological University analyzes this mixing with a holographic imaging instrument called HOLODEC and an airborne laboratory.

The work was done in collaboration with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Max Planck Institute for Chemistry and Mainz University. This new way of seeing clouds – and the way wet and dry air form sharp boundaries – is the focus of the team’s study, published in Science this week.

What the team found with these naturally created boundaries, formed by completely evaporating some water drops and leaving others unscathed, is called inhomogenous mixing. And it goes against base assumptions used in most computer models for cloud formations. [bold added]


The findings will influence models that help predict weather and climate change.

Full report: Using holography to better understand clouds

Comments
  1. oldbrew says:

    Note: the linked video in the full report may cause a screen lock.

  2. michael hart says:

    Pretty picture. That’s a viewing angle I’ve not seen before.

  3. oldbrew says:

    MH – it’s no. 5 at ‘Shuttle Views the Earth: Clouds from Space’ [or click on our pic to enlarge]

    http://www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/slidesets/clouds/clouds_index.shtml
    (This site also offers ‘hi-res’ versions of the slides, several MB each.)

  4. Curious George says:

    There is very little substance in that article. Maybe the experiment actually used holographic methods … maybe.

  5. oldbrew says:

    George: there’s a linked video but it didn’t load last time I tried.

  6. Bloke down the pub says:


    The findings will influence models that help predict weather and climate change.

    I doubt that . If the findings help to disprove cagw, they will be ignored.

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