Asian coal plant drive alarms climate alarmists

Posted: June 30, 2021 by oldbrew in alarmism, climate, Energy, Subsidies
Tags: , ,

chinacoal

Coal-hungry China [image credit: democraticunderground.com]

Prosperity before flaky climate theories for Asia’s present and future industrial powerhouse economies. Once again we’re sold the myth of ‘cheaper renewables’, which always need subsidies — even for being turned off.
– – –
Five Asian countries are responsible for 80 percent of new coal power stations planned worldwide, says Phys.org, with the projects threatening goals to fight the climate crisis, a report warned Wednesday.

China, India, Indonesia, Japan and Vietnam are planning to build more than 600 coal plants, think-tank Carbon Tracker said.

The stations will be able to generate a total of 300 gigawatts of energy—equivalent to around the entire electricity generating capacity of Japan.

The projects are being pursued despite the availability of cheaper renewables, and they threaten efforts to meet the Paris climate deal goal of limiting warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, the study said.

“These last bastions of coal power are swimming against the tide, when renewables offer a cheaper solution that supports global climate targets,” said Catharina Hillenbrand Von Der Neyen, Carbon Tracker’s head of research.

“Investors should steer clear of new coal projects.”

Experts see phasing out coal, which produces greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, as key in battling a climate crisis whose impacts—ranging from species extinction to unliveable heat—are expected to accelerate markedly. [Talkshop comment: are those the same ‘experts’ who are invariably wrong with their lurid climate predictions?].

But many countries in the Asia-Pacific region, long reliant on the fossil fuel to power their booming economies, have been slow to act, even as Europe and the United States accelerate their transitions to cleaner energy. [Talkshop comment: carbon dioxide has always been clean].

Asia-Pacific consumed over three-quarters of all coal used globally in 2019, according to BP’s statistical review of world energy.

‘Coal no longer makes sense’

China, the world’s biggest coal consumer and greenhouse gas emitter, tops the list of countries planning new , according to Carbon Tracker.

It has 368 power stations in the pipeline with 187 gigawatts of capacity, the think-tank said—despite a pledge by President Xi Jinping that China will become carbon neutral by 2060.

India, the second-biggest coal consumer, is planning 92 plants with about 60 gigawatts of capacity, according to the London-based think-tank, which focuses on the impact of the energy transition on financial markets.

Indonesia is planning 107 new plants, Vietnam 41, and Japan 14, it said.

Despite climate concerns, governments continue to pursue coal projects due to reasons ranging from lobbying, to efforts to support the industry, and concerns about security of electricity supply, the think-tank said.

Continued here.

Comments
  1. oldbrew says:

    In climate propaganda circles the steam from power station cooling towers has to be shown in shadowy half-light to make it look like something unpleasant, as here…

    Planet at its hottest in 115,000 years thanks to climate change, experts say
    4 Oct 2016
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/03/global-temperature-climate-change-highest-115000-years

    The headline admits it was about the same temperature as now during the last interglacial.

  2. saighdear says:

    Oh ffs as some say, I WISH, wish someone would make more of the simple everyday facts as supplied / presented eg : https://gridwatch.co.uk see for one’s self: Solar of course only part of day = Part time ( when it feels like it). Wind ( ?) like the rain – never when needed and not much this now. Maybepeopleshould see windpower aasa they see Rainfall in reservoirs: when drying up and levels fall, so is it with rechargeable batteries waiting for the wind to blow.
    WHEN there’s no Wind, the entire planet could becovered in windmills but there still wouldn’t be any electric generation: How Simple is that ? Boris n Co must be “on the weed” tha grows well in a non-herbicide environment. We call allowing weeds for the birds n bees – Plain LAZY farming. Daresay that allowing Fauna and Flora to grow on Kitchen / Theatre Worktops is Healthy, then? Hence development of Covid ……..

  3. Johna says:

    As long as coal is burnt efficiently and the steam at the close coupled condenser transfers its heat to district heating systems there is no reason why coal should not form a strategic part of any country’s electricity generating fuel mix. Something we once had in the UK until the tables were turned on coal and the working classes – the real reason why the elitist fascist politicians have made CO2 the smoking gun as they also control all satellite data and keep their flat earth IPCC data hidden too. But the HT at the turbine condensers can also be scaled down to heating offices factories and homes as all waste products can also be disposed of cleanly and efficiently. Coal can also provide CH4 and the diatomic gas H2, both very useful for clean and ultra clean vehicle fuel for inner city and local transportation needs. Re last interglacial; is nowhere near as hot now as the last interglacial as animals and mammals that now live in Africa lived here too. CO2 back then was also similar, although that is very hard to determine as is any ice core data after the firn is reached.

  4. […] Asian coal plant drive alarms climate alarmists […]

  5. Gamecock says:

    ‘The projects are being pursued despite the availability of cheaper renewables’

    Begging the question fallacy.

    And more. If renewables were cheaper, utilities would embrace them. They are being forced to implement them. Capitalists like nothing better than ‘cheaper.’ [Is this an Alinsky trick? Are they saying ‘cheaper’ because we love cheaper, and they really know renewables aren’t cheaper?]

    ‘These last bastions of coal power are swimming against the tide’

    The “tide” is 600 new coal plants. Maybe there is an English definition of “tide” I’m not aware of.

    ‘when renewables offer a cheaper solution that supports global climate targets,” said Catharina Hillenbrand Von Der Neyen, Carbon Tracker’s head of research.’

    ‘Solution’ implies a problem. There isn’t one. Asians are going to be a lot harder to convince there is a problem than Westerners.

    Renewables being ‘cheaper’ is preposterous. Renewables can NEVER be more than supplemental. It’s financially impossible.

  6. oldbrew says:

    Gamecock says: “Renewables being ‘cheaper’ is preposterous.”

    Indeed, but climate alarmists are preposterous and seem to have got away with it as far as many governments are concerned.

  7. oldbrew says:

    with the projects threatening goals to fight the climate crisis

    Puerile garbage.
    – – –
    China, the world’s biggest…greenhouse gas emitter

    Apart from nature, that is.

  8. Graeme No.3 says:

    “China, India, Indonesia, Japan and Vietnam are planning to build more than 600 coal plants, able to generate a total of 300 gigawatts of energy.”
    And Turkey (93), South Africa (79), The Phillippines(60) and about another 50 countries (including even the EU (27); but here in Australia where we have a total of 25GW capacity, it is impossible to build more, indeed the pressure is on to shutdown them all.
    Perhaps we should stop speaking English?

  9. Dodgy Geezer says:

    There is a push for western investors to stop supporting Asian coal plants.

    Problem is, it’s the Asians that have the money…

  10. Hasbeen says:

    Perhaps the real reason for such high migration from new sources is in the hope that as our complexion becomes darker, we might get back some of the common sense the white races once possessed, but have now lost, it having migrated to Asia in recent years.

  11. Coeur de Lion says:

    No mention of sub Saharan Africa’s needs for electricity? Chinese will provide the coal fired power stations in exchange for local influence.

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