Roman Warm Period was 2°C warmer than today, new study shows

Posted: July 25, 2020 by oldbrew in climate, Natural Variation, research, Temperature
Tags: ,

Credit: OH 237 @ Wikipedia


Natural climate variability similar to what we see today has been going on for thousands, if not millions of years, whether ‘greenhouse gas’ theorists moaning about modern human activities like it or not.
– – –
The Roman Empire coincided with warmest period of the last 2,000 years in the Med, says The GWPF.

The Mediterranean Sea was 3.6°F (2°C) hotter during the Roman Empire than other average temperatures at the time, a new study claims.

The Empire coincided with a 500-year period, from AD 1 to AD 500, that was the warmest period of the last 2,000 years in the almost completely land-locked sea.

The climate later progressed towards colder and arid conditions that coincided with the historical fall of the Empire, scientists claim.

Spanish and Italian researchers recorded ratios of magnesium to calcite taken from skeletonized amoebas in marine sediments, an indicator of sea water temperatures, in the Sicily Channel.

They say the warmer period may have also coincided with the shift from the Roman Republic to the great Empire founded by Octavius Augustus in 27 BC.

The study offers ‘critical information’ to identify past interactions between climate changes and evolution of human societies and ‘their adaptive strategies’.

It meets requests from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to assess the impact of historically warmer conditions between 2.7°F and 3.6°F (1.5°C to 2°C).

However, the historical warming of the Med during the Roman Empire is linked to intense solar activity, which contrasts with the modern threat of greenhouse gases.

For the first time, we can state the Roman period was the warmest period of time of the last 2,000 years, and these conditions lasted for 500 years,’ said Professor Isabel Cacho at the Department of Earth and Ocean Dynamics, University of Barcelona.

The Mediterranean is a semi-closed sea, meaning it is surrounded by land and almost only connected to oceans by a narrow outlet, and is a climate change ‘hot spot’ according to a previous paper.

Full article here.

Comments
  1. Jamie Spry says:

    Reblogged this on Climatism and commented:
    “What gets us into trouble is not what we don’t know,
    it’s what we know for sure that just ain’t so.”
    – Mark Twain

  2. Brian Parkin says:

    how lovely. balmy days on the Cornish Riviera.

  3. So all the creatures, plants etc that will be wiped out if we warm by 1.5 degrees didn’t get wiped out when the temperatures were 2 degrees?

  4. JB says:

    Looks to me like that’s what the GISP2 ice core plot shows, the only difference being the Mediterranean was in step with the global?

    “Spanish and Italian researchers recorded ratios of magnesium to calcite taken from skeletonized amoebas in marine sediments, an indicator of sea water temperatures, in the Sicily Channel.”

    I don’t suppose volcanic/magma activity in that area had anything to do with that?

    Long Range Weather shows the global temperature for that period much less than the Medieval.

    Still trying to figure out what is newsworthy about this study from their POV.

  5. Jim says:

    It’s re confirming history. That some of the written reports that said wine was grown in Greenland and the other Nordic countries may actually be true. That the notes had a modest population base and were self sufficient. Not the raiders that they became. You have to have a stable or improving climate to raise enough children to man the boats for exploration. We know armies, and cities need foodstuffs, religious people need food, and it, meaning foods do not grow in ice.

  6. Paulus Gladius Hottus says:

    I suppose the question is whether current temperature increases are due to same factors or other factors ie greenhouse gases. If the latter the potentially we are facing even higher temperatures. If not then it would seem to show temperature variation is a natural cyclical process and human impact on it may not be as significant as has been thought by many.

  7. This is very interesting information from Professor Isabel Cacho that the Roman period was the warmest period in the last 2000 years, and these conditions continued for 500 years …

  8. oldbrew says:

    Wikipedia:
    The Roman Warm Period, or Roman Climatic Optimum, was a period of unusually warm weather in Europe and the North Atlantic that ran from approximately 250 BC to AD 400.[1] Theophrastus (371 – c. 287 BC) wrote that date trees could grow in Greece if they were planted, but that they could not set fruit there. That is the case today, which suggests that South Aegean mean summer temperatures in the 4th and 5th centuries BC were within a degree of modern temperatures. That and other literary fragments from the time confirm that the Greek climate then was basically the same as it was around AD 2000. Dendrochronological evidence from wood found at the Parthenon shows variability of climate in the 5th century BC, which resembles the modern pattern of variation.
    [bold added]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Warm_Period
    – – –
    Today’s warmists need to account for this without allowing that anything similarly natural could happen again, e.g. now.

  9. […] Roman Warm Period was 2°C warmer than today, new study shows […]

  10. Brett Keane says:

    Dancing round the Truth, that must not be named. That CAGW is a Crock…… Brett Keane

  11. Chaeremon says:

    Climastrologers derive their Green”House”Effect so that it shows (TSI at TOA)/4 from which they subtract the naked Earth (YMMV). In EIKE forum I asked the specialists for applying their magical formular to climate relevant epoch(s) like the Roman period: crickets.

  12. Gamecock says:

    ‘The Mediterranean Sea was 3.6°F (2°C) hotter during the Roman Empire than other average temperatures at the time, a new study claims.’

    They simply have no way of knowing that.

    They might be able to claim it was warmer then than today, there. But that would be relative. We don’t know what the temperature was then, nor do we know now. Our sampling of the Med is limited. Mostly surface readings at population centers. For a million square miles, up to 3 miles deep.

  13. tallbloke says:

    Not strictly on topic, but a reminder of how the medieval warm period was obliterated by Keith Briffa in 1995 and reinstated by Jan Esper in 2003.

  14. Curious George says:

    Tree rings again. What surprising temperature records they preserve.

  15. oldbrew says:

    Warmth-Demanding Species, Glacier Melt Measurements Affirm Early Holocene Svalbard Was 7°C Warmer Than Now
    By Kenneth Richard on 27. July 2020

    https://notrickszone.com/2020/07/27/warmth-demanding-species-glacier-melt-measurements-affirm-early-holocene-svalbard-was-7c-warmer-than-now/

    Quotes 5 recent studies.

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