Spain, Portugal dryness ‘unprecedented’ in 1,200 years – or maybe not, say critics

Posted: July 6, 2022 by oldbrew in alarmism, atmosphere, climate, modelling, Natural Variation, pressure, research, weather
Tags: ,

Credit: NOAA


Some scientists contacted by Carbon Brief have their doubts about the reasons given for the reported expansion of the Azores high. An assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, warns that “the title statement is not justified by the study”. Another assistant professor, at the University of Dartmouth, told Carbon Brief ‘that changes in the size and intensity of the Azores high could also have been driven by changes in aerosol levels, rather than changes in greenhouse gases emissions. (For example, the passing of the US Clean Air Act in the 1970s saw pollution levels drop significantly, causing localised warming.) That the authors did not investigate this factor is “a curious omission” he says.’ On top of that, Prof Richard Seagar – a research professor at Columbia University – told Carbon Brief that the expansion in the Azores high could also “easily be explained by the long-term variability and changes of the North Atlantic Oscillation”.
In short, this attempt to put the blame on humans for the more recent climatic conditions related to this phenomenon is already starting to look shaky.

– – –
Parts of Portugal and Spain are the driest they have been in a thousand years due to an atmospheric high-pressure system driven by climate change, according to research published Monday, warning of severe implications for wine and olive production.

The Azores High, an area of high pressure that rotates clockwise over parts of the North Atlantic, has a major effect on weather and long-term climate trends in western Europe says Phys.org.

But in a new modeling study published in the journal Nature Geoscience, researchers in the United States found this high-pressure system “has changed dramatically in the past century and that these changes in North Atlantic climate are unprecedented within the past millennium”.

Using climate model simulations over the last 1,200 years, the study found that this high-pressure system started to grow to cover a greater area around 200 years ago, as human greenhouse gas pollution began to increase.

It expanded even more dramatically in the 20th century in step with global warming.

The authors then looked at evidence of rainfall levels preserved over hundreds of years in Portuguese stalagmites, and found that as the Azores High has expanded, the winters in the western Mediterranean have become drier.

The study cites projections that the level of precipitation could fall a further 10 to 20 percent by the end of this century, which the authors say would make Iberian agriculture “some of the most vulnerable in Europe”.

They warn that the Azores High will continue to expand during the 21st century as greenhouse gas levels rise, leading to an increasing risk of drought on the Iberian Peninsula and threatening key crops.

“Our findings have important implications for projected changes in western Mediterranean hydroclimate throughout the twenty-first century,” the authors said.

Wither vines

The Azores High acts as a “gatekeeper” for rainfall into Europe, according to the study, with dry air descending in the summer months to cause hot, arid conditions in much of Portugal, Spain and the western Mediterranean.

In the cool, wetter winter period, the high-pressure system swells, sending westerly winds carrying rain inland.

This winter rain is “vital” for both the ecological and economic health of the region, but it has been decreasing, particularly over the second half of the 20th century.

While previous research had not untangled the effects of natural variability on the Azores High, the authors said their findings show its expansion during the industrial era is linked to the rise of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

Full article here.

Comments
  1. […] Spain, Portugal dryness ‘unprecedented’ in 1,200 years – or maybe not, say cr… […]

  2. oldbrew says:

    ‘human greenhouse gas pollution’

    What? Carbon dioxide is plant food, not pollution and water vapour is by far the main so-called greenhouse gas. This is just brain-dead propaganda.

  3. oldbrew says:

    False alarm? Another climate claim getting some stick…

    Discovery reveals large, year-round ozone hole over tropics

    ‘New’ ozone hole much larger than Antarctic ozone hole
    Date: July 5, 2022
    Source: American Institute of Physics

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/07/220705112242.htm
    – – –
    Professor sounds the alarm on a ‘large’ hole in the ozone layer discovered over the tropics that could lead to increases of UV radiation over 50% of Earth’s surface – but other experts say the findings are inaccurate

    — A new study claims there is a hole in the ozone layer over the tropics
    — Professor Qing-Bin Lu, a researcher at the University of Waterloo, said it is comparable to that of the well-known springtime one over Antarctica
    — Other experts say there is no hole based on the data presented in the study
    — One expert said the study looks at percentage changes in ozone, rather than absolute changes
    DAILYMAIL.COM

    PUBLISHED: 23:01, 5 July 2022

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-10985405/Professor-sounds-alarm-hole-ozone-layer-experts-say-findings-inaccurate.html

  4. hunterson7 says:

    The projection of attribution by the climate faithful is downright medieval.

  5. hunterson7 says:

    The projection of attribution by the climate faithful is downright medieval.
    Great article by the way. Thank you for staying the course.

  6. Hasbeen says:

    So the rain in Spain, [& Portugal], aint gunna fill their dams no more, just like Australia.

    With the warmists making such predictions they had better get ready for the coming floods, just like Australia.

  7. Phoenix44 says:

    They continually Beg the Question. Driest for 1,000 years? There you go, climate has at least a 1,000 cycle before you see every possible variation.

    But somehow I’m doubting rainfall records from say 1322 are that accurate.

  8. oldbrew says:

    Phoenix – their method…

    The authors then looked at evidence of rainfall levels preserved over hundreds of years in Portuguese stalagmites, and found that as the Azores High has expanded, the winters in the western Mediterranean have become drier.

    Of course that doesn’t tell them anything about why the Azores High expanded, if it did.

  9. Curious George says:

    “Using climate model simulations over the last 1,200 years”
    Then it simply must be true. 🙂

  10. Phoenix44 says:

    Oldbrew, no doubt there are proxies such as stalactmites you can use andcthat can gd calibrated to an extent but I have yet to see a proxy that doesn’t have multiple variables as a cause for the one metric being used. In all this sort of work what is always obvious is that the “trend” follows the accuracy. The past has no change whatsoever but then as we get better and better at measuring/recording there’s a change. It’s just an artifact.

  11. oldbrew says:

    Maybe the fact the critics were out in force on the day the paper was publicised tells its own story.
    – – –
    the effects of natural variability on the Azores High

    What effects do they have in mind?

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