Archive for the ‘government’ Category

As I mentioned in the last installment of this series, as soon as I got home from the march on Parliament from Sunderland, I began preparation to stand in the local government elections on May 2nd. This will be voters’ first opportunity to give parliament a swift kick in the ballot box since the Brexit Betrayal on March 29th.

Campaign Leaflet – front side

This is really important because a genuine electoral threat is the only thing the main parties take any notice of. They will carry on undermining our country’s democracy unless they become convinced they will lose significant numbers of seats at elections.

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The 50 core marchers strode through London with thousands of people from all over the country behind them and joined the throng in Parliament Square on March 29th. After great speeches from leavers left and right, the man himself topped the bill with a short but inspiring message to all democrats.

It took us 14 days to march from Sunderland to Westminster. This bloke has given 25 years of his life to the cause of regaining independence for the UK. Spare him 8 minutes of your time.

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I’ve been on the March To Leave for a week, and just got a day off to visit family and give my plates of meat a rest. I’m back on the march tomorrow, so no time for a big write up yet. Here is my simple summary, as delivered to ITN news two days ago, and below, some more complex analysis of the current situation from Simon Pearson on twitter

4. Which means EU dates become irrelevant and we still leave on 29 March.
5. Unless, that is, Remainers sieze control of Govt business from the back benches and across party?
6. But can they? To stop UK leaving on 29 March requires primary legislation – it is the law if the land.

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Electric Tuk Tuk [image credit: cleantechnica.com]


But India makes a point of not handing any money to people wanting to buy the more expensive EVs, as Forbes News reports. Whether they can produce enough electricity to back up their policy is not clear. The majority of their power supply is from coal, plus some diesel generators.

To encourage the growth of the electric vehicle (EV) industry in India, the government has developed a two-pronged strategy aimed at both buyers and manufacturers: $1.4 billion in subsidies are to be offered, followed by a hike on import tariffs within the next year to spur domestic companies to build the vehicles.

The new policy, which was cleared by the cabinet late last month but the details of which were not available till now, kicks in with the new financial year in April.

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When I was a ten year old kid back in 1974 I got a first inkling that my country becoming a member of an international club might have some downsides. One evening, I overheard my Grandfather, a veteran of two world wars, and my Dad, an engineer, discussing ‘the common market’. They both had misgivings about it being ‘the thin end of the wedge’. I don’t recall many of the details, but the following year during the referendum campaign, I chose to wear an ugly yellow pin badge handed out by local Labour party campaigners which said ‘NO’ on it in black block capitals. My sister chose the pretty white badge with the flying dove carrying an olive branch on it which said ‘YES’; a much more positive message from that nice Mr Heath.

By the age of twenty, I was far too busy riding fast motorcycles, courting young ladies and climbing mountains to be interested in international politics. It wasn’t until I joined the Motorcycle Action Group [MAG] that I learned about the increasing amounts of bureaucratic regulation emanating from Brussels which was affecting our lifestyle. This reached a head in 1992 when the Brussels commissioners sent a raft of new legislation called the ‘Vehicle Multi-directive’ to the European parliament for rubber stamping.

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The delusional in pursuit of the impossible. Entertaining for outsiders perhaps, but bad news for residents picking up the tab and wondering where their reliable electricity went.

STOP THESE THINGS

Michael Daley: says, when the wind blows, my RET will be THIS big!

Australia’s energy policy crisis is like Game of Thrones starring complete idiots – every crazy plot twist is matched by something crazier still. The latest comes from New South Wales.

NSW Labor opposition leader, Michael Daley isn’t the first, and he won’t be the last, maniac to suggest the world can be powered entirely by sunshine and breezes.

Where the current Liberal Energy (and Arts) Minister, Don Harwin reckons his (secretly hoped-for) 50% Renewable Energy Target is big, Michael Daley’s goes all the way to 11.

Should Harwin get his 50% RET, NSW will find itself in the same category as that international laughingstock, South Australia. But if Michael Daley gets his way, it’ll be a case of the last man out, turning out all the lights.

Coal dead under Labor’s dramatic renewables plan
The…

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Help Ned by emailing the White House to recommend his inclusion on the panel.

About time too!

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Photosynthesis: nature requires carbon dioxide


The absurdity of a ruling that vital trace gas carbon dioxide is a ‘pollutant’ has been allowed to stand for far too long. What would nature say? (see graphic)

I have advocated independent review of climate science by the Trump Administration over the last few years, most recently here, writes Alan Carlin.

The best way to do this is a formal reevaluation and rejection of the Greenhouse Gas Endangerment Finding (EF) issued by the Obama US Environmental Protection Agency in 2009. This might lead to real action–rejection of the EF.

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Earth and climate – an ongoing controversy


Another battle between artificial paranoia and natural common sense beckons.

The White House is working to assemble a panel to assess whether climate change poses a national security threat, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post, a conclusion that federal intelligence agencies have affirmed several times since President Trump took office.

The proposed Presidential Committee on Climate Security, which would be established by executive order, is being spearheaded by William Happer, a National Security Council senior director.

Happer, an emeritus professor of physics at Princeton University, has said that carbon emissions linked to climate change should be viewed as an asset rather than a pollutant.

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Credit: mygridgb.co.uk


H/T The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)
Relying on interconnectors to get out of trouble when the wind isn’t blowing won’t be a good plan long-term, when most of Europe is pushing its own wind-dependent electricity plans forward. Nuclear and coal are largely fading out of the UK scene, so for industrial-scale reliable power it has to be gas or bust in the end, whether UK-sourced or not.

The chairman of Britain’s biggest private company has accused the government of using “slippery back door manoeuvres” to kill off fracking in the UK, reports City A.M.

Sir Jim Ratcliffe, the billionaire founder of Ineos, said the government is sticking to a plan which is “unworkable, unhelpful and playing politics with the country’s future”.

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Case dismissed


Another attempt to get judges to override Government policy in the name of disputed climate theories falls by the wayside.

The case, brought by 11 members of the public and the NGO Plan B argued the UK’s 2050 climate target was not in line with the Paris Agreement, reports Climate Home News.
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A UK citizens’ lawsuit over the government’s 2050 climate target hit “the end of the road” this week after an appeals court refused to hear the case, the climate legal group Plan B announced.

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Carbon Tax Ignorance

Posted: January 31, 2019 by oldbrew in Emissions, government, Politics
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The ongoing civil unrest of the ‘Yellow Vests’ in France was triggered by a carbon tax proposal. Resistance to an unnecessary new tax isn’t surprising.

PA Pundits - International

By Craig Rucker ~

There’s a new push on to institute a carbon tax in America.

This is folly.  Bi-partisan folly.

The carbon tax folks have compiled a large list of economists and past public office-holders in support, with some pretty impressive names on board.    The names include such heavy-hitters as Ben Bernanke, Alan Greenspan, Janet Yellen, George Shultz, Lawrence Summers and many more.

Two Florida Congressmen, Democrat Ted Deutch and Republican Francis Rooney, announced they are planning to introduce a carbon tax bill with the money raised paid out as “rebates” to individuals.

Never has so much brain power been so wrong.

As Mark Mathis posted at CFACT.org:

The idea of a tax on carbon is that it will cause people to use smaller amounts of oil, natural gas, and coal while driving innovation in the energy sector. But there’s a big problem with this kind of…

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Photosynthesis: nature requires carbon dioxide


It’s Ireland’s turn to find ways of sucking the life out of its economy to appease the climate alarm lobby.
H/T The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)

Irish MPs and senators are split over plans for a fourfold increase in carbon tax to put Ireland on course to meet its 2030 climate change targets, following the yellow vest protests in France, says The Times.

Fine Gael and Green Party members of the Oireachtas climate action committee want a report next month to recommend a carbon tax of at least €80 a ton over the next decade, which would add €12 to the cost of filling a car with diesel or petrol and €7.20 to a bag of coal.

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It may have taken a knock, but it’s by no means the last we’ll hear of it, as CFACT explains.

The first major meeting of the UN’s (take a breath) “Ad hoc Open-ended Working Group towards a Global Pact for the Environment” or simply OEWG, convened on Monday, 14 January 2019 at the United Nations Environment Program offices in Nairobi, Kenya.

During the week-long session, delegates considered the report of the United Nations Secretary-General (UNSG), titled “Gaps in international environmental law and environment-related instruments: towards a global pact for the environment.”

This is the newly hatched grand green dream, for a binding set of new global laws that both encompasses and surpasses all of the existing multinational environmental treaties and agreements (MEAs). I am not making this up.

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The latest over-the-top climate policy from the American west coast.

American Elephants

The California Coastal Commission is set to empower local governments to pursue eminent domain to take 1,100 miles of coastline in order to prepare for sea level rise. Local jurisdictions will implement a “managed retreat” policy that will allow taking and demolishing coastal homes and businesses.

This will allow communities to dismantle and relocate power plants, 250 miles of highway, 1,500 miles of roads and 110 miles of railway.

This battle is going to be fun, when the state tries to take Environmentalist Tom Steyer’s coastal property, in the name of saving the rest of California from the horrors of global warming and its sea level rise.

Scientists are not sure that there is any rise in sea level at all. What little discrepancy they see may simply be coastline shrinking.

Roy Spencer PhD. noted recently that “Climate Models are warming the Global Lower Atmosphere 67% Faster than the average…

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Drax power station [credit: drax.com]


Such massive subsidies probably couldn’t suddenly disappear, but might be scaled back or even phased out. Contrary to the report, carbon dioxide contributes nothing to air pollution..

Controversial subsidies for burning wood in power stations could be scrapped in the drive to clean up Britain’s air.

Firms across the UK that burn wood pellets currently receive about £1billion a year because, unlike coal, these are considered renewable sources of energy, says the Daily Mail.

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Monetising the wind isn’t going to solve anyone’s electricity supply problems. Exactly the reverse is far more likely.

STOP THESE THINGS

The meme has it that wind and solar are all about slashing CO2 emissions, whereas that pathetic pair are just a colossal moneymaking scam.

Apart from South Australia, no country other than Germany threw more at chaotically intermittent wind and solar.

The results have been an utter debacle: Germans suffer the second highest power prices in Europe, just behind wind ‘powered’ Denmark, and those prices are rocketing north at double-digit rates. The German grid is on the brink of collapse.

And all in an effort to curb emissions of carbon dioxide gas. Leaving aside arguments about whether CO2 is a toxic pollutant or a naturally occurring beneficial trace gas which plants crave, if the primary object of Germany’s ‘transition’ to an all wind and sun powered future was cutting carbon dioxide gas emissions, the result has been a dismal failure – that’s cost Germans more than a €Trillion, so…

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Why not just drop the fuel taxes and have every private car user pay mileage fees, maybe based on vehicle weight?

Since electric vehicles use no gasoline, their drivers pay no gasoline tax.

And as more people drive EVs, gas-tax revenue for road repairs is dwindling, says Phys.org.

So how can California and the rest of the country avoid road-funding shortfalls and ensure that EV drivers pay their share of needed repairs?

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Shale gas drilling site [image credit: BBC]


If they applied the same rules to the railways there might not be many freight trains around. The Richter scale doesn’t even rate tremors below magnitude 1, and describes those between 1.0 and 1.9 as ‘Micro-earthquakes, not felt, or felt rarely’. Upto 2.9 is ‘Felt slightly by some people. No damage to buildings’.

H/T The Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)

Shale gas is unlikely to be developed in Britain unless strict limits on earthquakes caused by fracking are relaxed, the company with the biggest exploration rights has warned.

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Sabine Pass LNG Terminal, Louisiana [image credit: naturalgasnow.org]


As well as wanting to avoid dependency on Russian gas, Poland has no intention of freezing in the dark to appease so-called climate activists.

Poland is seeking to reduce its dependence on Russia and the Nord Stream 2 pipeline for its LNG supplies, says DW.com.

The deal should provide for 15 percent of Poland’s daily gas needs over the next 20 years.

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