Posts Tagged ‘gas’

[credit: cityam.com]


H/T GWPF

It’s been a bumpy road so far for UK shale gas and there could be more of the same ahead, but for now it’s progress. The US has shown that big economic benefits to the nation are there for the taking if the drilling is as successful as predicted.

British unconventional exploration company Cuadrilla plans to start the drilling stage of its shale gas exploratory plans in northwest England within the next “couple of months,” company CEO Francis Egan said this week.

Egan welcomed the UK’s High Court decision dismissing two claims made against Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Sajid Javid’s approval of planning for Cuadrillla’s Preston New Road site.

Last year, the company had its planning application denied by the local Lancashire councillors, but that was overruled by Javid, following a recommendation to approve from the council’s planning officers.
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Knottingley is next door to the recently closed Ferrybridge C coal-fired power station [credit: Google maps]


If (as stated below) the UK’s electricity reserve margin fell to a feeble 0.1% this winter, now seems like a good time to get some new reliable power generation organised.

The ESB is planning a $1bn (€1bn) power plant in the UK and seeking an equity partner to help build the huge 1,600 megawatt facility, reports PEI.

The plant earmarked for Knottingley in Yorkshire would be one of Britain’s biggest, if it goes ahead. The company has already secured planning permission on the 50-acre site.

The Irish Independent reports that investment bank Nomura has been hired by the ESB to find a partner for the new gas-fired power station development, code-named Project Knight Rider.
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River Amazon in the Peruvian rainforest

River Amazon in the Peruvian rainforest


The UK is importing from halfway round the world what could be produced by its own workforce within the country.

A tanker docking in the UK is transporting a controversial cargo of gas from the Peruvian Amazon, says BBC News. It is thought to be the first shipment to the UK from the Camisea project in rainforest 60 miles from Machu Picchu.

Supporters of fracking say the UK should frack its own gas, rather than importing from sensitive regions like the Amazon. But opponents of fracking say the practice creates disturbance and pollution and fuels climate change.

The tanker Gallina, owned by Shell, is scheduled to arrive at the Isle of Grain in Kent. The gas project at Camisea field has been hugely contentious.
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churcheng
Sometimes, that is. Any financial returns would also be acceptable no doubt.
H/T GWPF

The Church of England has concluded that fracking can be morally acceptable in a move that shale gas explorers hope could pave the way for drilling to take place on church land.

After years of internal debate on the issue, the church has published an extensive briefing paper giving cautious support for fracking subject to conditions, including strict regulation, environmental monitoring and compensation for those affected.

It concluded that fracking could be useful to tackle climate change as long as shale gas replaced dirtier energy sources. The position puts it at odds with groups such as Christian Aid, which opposes all fracking on climate grounds.
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frackarea
Now these ‘campaigners’ know how wind turbine protesters feel when they get overruled in their neighbourhoods.

Anti-fracking campaigners have lost their legal challenge to a decision to allow fracking to take place in North Yorkshire reports BBC News. Third Energy was granted planning permission to extract shale gas at Kirby Misperton in Ryedale in May.

Friends of the Earth and residents had challenged North Yorkshire County Council’s decision in the High Court. Mrs Justice Lang ruled the council had acted lawfully.

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The evolution of gas reciprocating engines 

Posted: December 10, 2016 by oldbrew in Energy, innovation
Tags:

recip1
Experts say reciprocating gas engines can respond faster to load changes than any other prime mover, can compete with small gas turbine systems and also help fill in an efficient way the gap left by the lack of energy storage in most grid systems, as Power Engineering reports.

In southern Minnesota, where wind turbines and ethanol plants are commonplace, two communities have turned to reciprocating engine technology to meet their future power generation needs.

The Fairmont Energy Station, a 25-MW project completed in 2014, and the Owatonna Energy Station, a 38-MW project now under construction, feature highly flexible, quick-starting, low-maintenance reciprocating engines suited for today’s market, which places a premium on rapid-cycling capabilities.

Minnesota is home to about 100 wind power projects and ranks No. 7 in net wind power production in the U.S. That means Minnesota power producers must have reliable backup power to fill the sudden gaps created by growing supplies of intermittent wind power. The $30 million Fairmont plant is well suited for the job, capable of reaching full capacity in just eight minutes. That’s significantly faster than power plants using the latest gas turbine technology.

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Carrington Power Station near Manchester

Carrington Power Station near Manchester


Britain has backed itself into a corner over electricity supply by rigging the market to favour renewables, but as the Daily Telegraph explains, things will have to change.
H/T GWPF

As a result of Britain’s energy policies, building new gas-fired power plants is no longer economic. Now, the Government has to subsidise gas investors to keep the lights on.

Four years ago this week, the Government unveiled plans for a bold new dash for gas. New gas-fired power stations, then-energy secretary Ed Davey said, would be required to “provide crucial capacity to keep the lights on”.

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Climate obsessives never know when to stop being ridiculous.

American Elephants

herd-with-moomonitor-collars
California is sliding slowly into the abyss. It’s not enough that 9,000 companies have packed up and moved to more tax-friendly states. The Bay Area is so expensive that few can afford to live there. Progressives run the place like their own personal slot machine.

The California Air Resources Board has issued regulations to cut the state’s greenhouse emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, but the board is getting worried about their climate agenda. It could all be ruined by natural phenomena.They’ve gone after the oil producers, the manufacturers and now they are going after the cows.

It’s methane, which”according to the board is a ‘short-lived climate pollutant with an outsized impact on climate change in the near term.” ” “Cow manure and ‘enteric fermentation’ (flatulence) account for half of the state’s methane emissions.”

“If dairy farms in California were to manage manure in a way to further reduce methane…

View original post 264 more words

The launch of the Ineos Insight Dragon shale supertanker2 [image credit:  scottishenergynews.com]

The launch of the Ineos Insight Dragon shale supertanker2 [image credit: scottishenergynews.com]


The days of North Sea gas and oil dominating the UK energy scene are over as this news demonstrates. If the Scot Nats are insisting on ‘no damage to the environment’ why are the hills and coasts increasingly strewn with towering wind turbines?
H/T GWPF

The first shipment of American shale gas extracted by the controversial fracking technique will arrive in Scotland next month, The Times has learnt.

Industry insiders have confirmed that the first of a fleet of “Dragon-class” ships, each capable of transporting huge quantities of the shale gas ethane, will dock within the next seven weeks.

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Credit: pbs.org

Credit: pbs.org


You couldn’t make it up. Heartlander Magazine reporting.

Despite its recent announcement it may not adopt the Paris Climate agreement before the end of 2016, India is moving ahead with a unique effort attempting to reduce the greenhouse gases its agricultural sector emits into the atmosphere: creating cows and livestock that burp and fart less. 

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Shale formation for natural gas in Pennsylvania, USA.  [image credit:  businesskorea.co.kr]

Shale formation for natural gas in Pennsylvania, USA.
[image credit:
businesskorea.co.kr]


Another setback for fear-and-doubt merchants with this legal victory for shale gas development, as Somewhat Reasonable reports. Lack of evidence perhaps?

On Monday, May 2 the Colorado Supreme Court ruled on what the New York Times (NYT) called: “a lengthy battle for energy production.” The court’s unanimous decision to strike down two cities’ limits on fracking is a victory for oil-and-gas companies and a “disappointment” to anti-fossil-fuel activists. 

Several states, including Colorado’s neighbors, New Mexico and Texas, have faced similar anti-oil-and-gas initiatives that have also been shot down.

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Hydraulic fracturing wellhead  [image credit: Joshua Doubek / Wikipedia]

Hydraulic fracturing wellhead
[image credit: Joshua Doubek / Wikipedia]


It’s enough to make celebrity anti-fracking protesters choke on their cakes. — H/T Phys.org

Potential future fracking activity in the UK is unlikely to pose a pollution danger to overlying aquifers, new research from a leading academic suggests.

One of the primary concerns of those who oppose the development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing is that creation of new fractures in the earth could cause fracking fluids to leak into, and contaminate, underground freshwater aquifers.

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New fuel source [image credit: telegraph.co.uk]

New fuel source [image credit: telegraph.co.uk]


Despite appearances this is a Daily Telegraph report, not an April Fool joke.

Hundreds of homes in Cumbria will be heated using cheese from next month, as a new government-backed green energy plant starts producing gas from cheddar production waste.

The anaerobic digestion plant at the Lake District Creamery in Aspatria will receive millions of pounds in subsidies for turning whey and other residues from the cheese production process into “biogas”.

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[image credit: FT.com]

[image credit: FT.com]


It’s an ambitious plan and renewables are in there too, but it’s one thing to talk big numbers of dollars, another to produce them when needed. PEI mulls over the proposals.

The African Development Bank’s new president Akinwumi Adesina says he can mobilize up to $55bn to end the continent’s power generation problems. At least 620 million people have no access to power, including vast populations in war-torn countries such as South Sudan, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Adesina told Bloomberg, “I’m not bothered by that amount – that money is there. Today Africa generates $540bn in tax revenue per year. If you take 10 per cent of that and devote it to the energy sector, the problem is solved. If we light up and power Africa, we can have a GDP growth rate of double digits without any problem at all.”

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Gas power station [credit: gov.uk]

Gas power station [credit: gov.uk]


UK energy policy is in danger of crumbling, with delays and doubts over its nuclear plans and now a financial crisis facing its gas power plans, as the Daily Telegraph reports.

The UK Government’s plans to keep the lights on have suffered a fresh setback after it emerged the only new large gas power station due to be built in coming years is now in doubt.

Energy firm Carlton Power was awarded a subsidy contract by the Department of Energy and Climate Change last year to build a new 1.9 gigawatt plant at Trafford in Greater Manchester – big enough to supply power to 2.2 million homes.The £800 million plant was due to start generating in October 2018, but Carlton Power told the Telegraph it could no longer meet that date – and had so far failed to secure financial backers for the project to go ahead at all.

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LNG vessels [image credit: offshoreenergytoday.com]

LNG vessels [image credit: offshoreenergytoday.com]


This is part of the big US push to challenge the world leaders Russia and Qatar in the export of gas, mostly sourced from fracking sites. Expect a price war.

Bechtel announced today it has been selected by Delfin LNG, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Fairwood Peninsula Energy Corporation, to perform front-end engineering and design for the first U.S.-based floating liquefied natural gas vessel (FLNGV) to go into service at Port Delfin. 

Port Delfin is a proposed deepwater port and floating LNG facility that will be located approximately 50 miles off the coastline of Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Delfin LNG’s project will be the first offshore floating natural gas liquefaction facility in the United States.

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Saudi Britannia?

Posted: April 15, 2015 by oldbrew in Energy, Politics
Tags: ,
Nodding donkey, or pump jack [credit: Wikipedia]

Nodding donkey, or pump jack [credit: Wikipedia]

Is this North Sea oil and gas – part 2, or will British politicians shy away from the wealth under our feet, citing nebulous climate theories that don’t work in the real world?

Huw Jenkins of Shale Energy Insider reports:
Following reports that the Jurassic Kimmeridge formation in England could contain more oil than Saudi Arabia’s Ghawar – the world’s largest oil reserve – the conversation about oil and gas drilling in England is heating up, once again.

Chris Faulkner, CEO of Breitling Energy Corporation based in Dallas, Texas, known by the media as the ‘Frack Master’, thinks that the reports are a “game changer” for England and that shale exploration will still be viable in the UK, despite oil and gas prices.

“We knew about this potential long before it became news and now UKOG has proven what the geology showed.  This is actually an extension of the same formation that was being extracted in the North Sea. It just comes on land, and ironically is not far from Gatwick Airport,” Faulkner said.

“This is a game changer for England, and they will now have to shift their entire focus on how to approach oil and gas production.  There’s too much at stake now for them not to,” he added.

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